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Best All-Terrain Tires for Taking the Road Less Traveled

All-Terrain Tires
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Our evaluations and opinions are not influenced by our advertising relationships, but we may earn a commission from our partners’ links. This content is created independently from TIME’s editorial staff. Learn more about it.

updated: June 4, 2024

For voyagers of the road less traveled, all-terrain tires are designed for high-function and safety in different environments and driving conditions. Ideally, they provide a comfortable and stable ride whether or not you’re going where the road takes you. Check out some of the top picks for the best all-terrain tires below.

Our top picks for best all-terrain tires

Best budget all-terrain tires: Firestone Destination A/T2

Best budget all-terrain tires
Firestone Destination A/T2

Firestone Destination A/T2

Whether you’re tire shopping for your pickup truck, full-size SUV, or crossover, Firestone’s Destination A/T2 all-terrain tires are a great option for the price, which varies based on size. This tire scores high on off-road surfaces as well as for snow and ice.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 29 - 41 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 15 - 22 inches
  • 3PMSF [“3 Peak Mountain Snowflake” symbol, used to denote verified safety for driving in snowy conditions]: Severe snow service rated
  • Treadwear: 540
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: $157.99 - $315.99

The bottom line:

The Destination A/T2 tires from Firestone are good in wet conditions, light snow, and on- and off-road for all-around value.

Get it here: Firestone Destination A/T2


Best light truck all-terrain tires: Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus

Best light truck all-terrain tires
Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus

Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus

The Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus tires top this category, offering excellent ratings in off-road, wet, and dry conditions. These light truck tires are compatible with pickup trucks, crossovers and SUVs, and prioritize durability, traction, and wear-resistance on- and off-road.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 32 - 59 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 16 - 20 inches
  • 3PMSF: Severe snow service rated
  • Treadwear: 640
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: $205 - $438

The bottom line:

For light trucks, the Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus tires are good quality for the price, and certified on ice and snow.

Get it here: Pirelli Scorpion All-Terrain Plus


Best all-terrain tires for daily driving: NeoTerra NeoTrax 265/70R16 112T WL

Best all-terrain tires for daily driving
NeoTerra NeoTrax 265/70R16 112T WL

NeoTerra NeoTrax 265/70R16 112T WL

The NeoTrax all-terrain tires’ zig-zagged tread grooves are designed for light trucks and SUVs to perform optimally in wet and dry conditions. The unique tread can transition from off-road terrain to paved roads and is a great value for the price point. The speed rating is on point for smaller vans, which makes it a good tire for daily use that’s not too crazy. Financing is available through Affirm up to 18 months with rates between 10% and 36%.

Specifications:

  • Weight: Not listed
  • Rim sizes: 6 - 9.5
  • 3PMSF: No
  • Treadwear: 520
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: $129.98 – $235.06

The bottom line:

The NeoTerra NeoTrax all-terrain tires are an affordable, daily option for your light truck and SUV, although not rated for extreme weather conditions.

Get it here: NeoTerra NeoTrax 265/70R16 112T WL


Best all-season all-terrain tire: Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Terrain Tire

Best all-season all-terrain tire
Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Season Radial Tire - 265/60R18 110T

Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Season Radial Tire - 265/60R18 110T

The Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Terrain Tire is made to fit light trucks and SUVs. Its non-directional tread pattern promotes stability on-road, and longevity by combatting uneven tread wear. The variable width lugs—basically the raised part of the tread—shuffle mud and other debris from the tread, and also lend themselves to shoulder stability.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 35 - 79 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 15 - 20 inches
  • 3PMSF: Severe snow service rated
  • Treadwear: 660
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: $216.99

The bottom line:

The Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Terrain Tire is an affordable and versatile all-terrain tire for all seasons.

Get it here: Sumitomo Encounter AT All-Terrain Tire


Best quiet all-terrain tire: Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tires

Best quiet all-terrain tire
Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tires

Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tires

For light passenger trucks and SUVs, the Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tire’s deep, interlocking tread blocks provide a surprisingly quiet ride on pavement and other terrain, and also promotes even tread wear. This tire is durable, even in wintry conditions. Shopping tip: Goodyear also made our list of the best places to buy tires online.

Specifications:

  • Weight: Not listed
  • Rim sizes: 28.9
  • 3PMSF: Severe weather rated
  • Treadwear: 580
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: Starting at $121.26

The bottom line:

The Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tire is a quiet option for all types of terrain.

Get it here: Goodyear Wrangler Trailrunner AT Tires


Best on-road all-terrain tire: Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar

Best on-road all-terrain tire
Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar

Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar

For on-road all-terrain tires, the Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure tire tops the list, due to its specialized rubber tread compound and use of kevlar cord in the internal structure that doesn’t skimp on the comfort. This tire can tow long distances, as well as perform off-road.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 35 - 57 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 16 - 20 inches
  • 3PMSF: Severe weather certified
  • Treadwear: Not listed
  • Traction: Not listed
  • Temperature: Not listed
  • Price on publish: Starting at $227.99

The bottom line:

The Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure tire is a great mix of strength, versatility, and comfort at a middle-of-the-road price point.

Get it here: Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure With Kevlar


Best all-terrain tires for towing: Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3 Tire

Best all-terrain tires for towing
Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3 All Terrain Tire P275/55R20 111 T

Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3 All Terrain Tire P275/55R20 111 T

If you tow trailers or other cargo often enough for it to factor into your tire purchase, the Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3 Tire is a great option. The tread pattern sports traction claws, which are designed to grip the road or terrain in any condition, without sacrificing comfort and quiet on the highway.

Specifications:

  • Weight: Not listed
  • Rim sizes: Not listed
  • 3PMSF: Severe weather rated
  • Treadwear: 540
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: Starts at $230.99

The bottom line:

If you’re looking for an all-terrain tire that can occasionally tow heavy cargo without sacrificing comfort, look no further than the Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3.

Get it here: Bridgestone Dueler A/T Revo 3 Tire


Best aggressive look all-terrain tires: Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season

Best aggressive look all-terrain tires
Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season

Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season

For an aggressive-looking all-terrain tire that’s relatively affordable, the Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season tire is a versatile option that provides good value. It sports a deep tread with a dual sidewall and studs on the inside of the rim that are anything but subtle.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 40 - 67 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 16 - 20 inches
  • 3PMSF: Severe weather rated
  • Treadwear: 600
  • Traction: A
  • Temperature: B
  • Price on publish: $216

The bottom line:

If you want an all-terrain tire that looks just as tough as it is, the Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season tire is for you.

Get it here: Cooper Discoverer Rugged Trek All-Season


Best all-terrain tires for snow: General Grabber A/T X

Best all-terrain tires for snow
General Grabber A/T X

General Grabber A/T X

The General Grabber A/T X is a hefty all-terrain option that performs especially well in wintry conditions—in fact, it meets the severe snow standards of both the Rubber Manufacturers Association and the Tire and Rubber Association of Canada. It rates highly in winter and snow, dry, and wet performance, as well as in comfort categories.

Specifications:

  • Weight: 28 - 82 pounds
  • Rim sizes: 14 - 22 inches
  • Mileage: Not listed
  • 3PMSF: Severe snow service rated
  • Treadwear: Not listed
  • Traction: Not listed
  • Temperature: Not listed
  • Price on publish: $173.99 - $561.99

The bottom line:

If you’re looking to invest in a wintry all-terrain tire for your truck, the General Grabber A/T X’s snow and ice performance is worth the money.

Get it here: General Grabber A/T X


What to consider when buying all-terrain tires

The purchase of any tire isn’t to be done on a whim. Here are some things to think about when you’re shopping for all-terrain tires.

Your use environment

Primarily wet, icy, or dry conditions, as well as paved or mud roads, play a role in determining where you should focus your attention in finding the best all-terrain tires. The frequency with which these tires will travel on a paved road, the climate where you live, and whether this is your primary vehicle should all be considered when you start shopping.

Performance versus longevity

When it comes to all-terrain tires, performance and longevity do not necessarily go hand-in-hand. Prioritizing one over the other will go a long way in narrowing down your options.

Price

Prices for all-terrain tires can vary from $100 to $400 per tire, so it’s important to establish a budget before you start shopping. Setting this limit will also weed out a decent number of options for you and narrow your pool.

How we selected the best all-terrain tires

We drew on industry experts’ advice and reviewed a selection of online and traditional retailers to make our recommendations for the best all-terrain tires, with an emphasis on price, durability, and performance. All of our picks prioritize financing options and have transparent warranty and trial periods. All but one of our picks are severe weather rated.

How do all-terrain tires differ from other tires?

There are few key features that distinguish all-terrain tires from other designs like snow tires and all-season tires:

  • Versatility: Unlike standard tires, all-terrain tires are designed to handle both on- and off-road terrains.
  • Tread pattern: All-terrain tires sport larger and deeper tread blocks, designed to better grip the road or terrain in varying conditions.
  • Sidewall construction: Sidewall construction on all-terrain tires is stronger and reinforced to resist punctures from rocks or other rubble they may encounter in off-road conditions.
  • On-road performance: Though they can drive on paved roads, their design may not offer the same comfort or stability on road as standard tires.
  • Tire longevity: Depending on the quality and how they are used, all-terrain tires may have shorter longevity due to the softer tread.

How to read a tire’s sidewall

Jim Cole, former VP of Field Operations and Reconditioning at Vroom, a used vehicle platform, provided us with this helpful guide on how to read a tire's sidewall:

  • Tire type and purpose: The first letter or letters on a tire sidewall indicate the type of tire, e.g. P (passenger), LT (light truck), T (temporary), and ST (special trailer).

  • Tire width: The three-digit number following the tire type represents the tire width in millimeters.

  • Aspect ratio: The two-digit number after the slash (/) represents the aspect ratio, which is the ratio of the tire's height to its width.

  • Construction type: The letter following the aspect ratio indicates the tire's construction, e.g., R (radial construction) or D (diagonal construction).

  • Wheel diameter: The two-digit number following the construction type represents the diameter of the wheel in inches.

  • Load index: The load index is a numerical code indicating the maximum load-carrying capacity of the tire. Refer to a load index chart to find the corresponding weight capacity.

  • Speed rating: The speed rating indicates the maximum speed the tire can handle safely. Common speed ratings include:

    • S: Up to 112 mph
    • T: Up to 118 mph
    • H: Up to 130 mph
    • V: Up to 149 mph
    • W: Up to 168 mph
    • Y: Up to 186 mph
  • Tire identification number (TIN): The TIN represents information about the tire’s manufacturing location, tire size, and week and year it was produced, through a series of numbers and letters.

  • Uniform tire quality grading (UTQG): The UTQG is a three-number rating system that provides information on treadwear, traction, and temperature resistance. Higher values indicate better performance.

  • Treadwear/traction/temperature ratings: These are specific grades indicating the tire's performance characteristics:

    • Treadwear: A higher number indicates longer tread life.
    • Traction: Rated from AA to C, with AA being the highest traction.
    • Temperature: Rated from A to C, with A being the highest resistance to heat.
    • Maximum inflation pressure: The maximum pressure the tire can handle is listed in pounds per square inch (psi). Check your vehicle's recommended tire specifications in the owner's manual or on the vehicle's placard to ensure compatibility and optimal performance.

Taking care of your all-terrain tires

According to Cole, you should always refer to the tire manufacturer's recommendations and specifications for proper care and maintenance to maximize the lifespan of your chosen tires. Generally speaking, you should conduct regular inspections and rotations, ensure proper inflation and alignment, and avoid overloading your all-terrain tires.

Related: Best Tonneau Covers to Outfit Your Truck

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Do all-terrain tires last longer than regular tires?

As is the case with all tires, longevity depends on driving habits, maintenance, and quality. Though the softer tread used for all-terrain tires can make for a shorter lifespan, if used properly there’s no reason high quality all-terrain tires can’t last as long as standard tires.

What are the disadvantages of all-terrain tires?

Potential disadvantages of all-terrain tires include road noise and road handling, fuel efficiency, tread wear, cost, weight, and aesthetics.

What is the difference between rugged terrain and all-terrain?

The use of the terms “rugged terrain” and “all-terrain” may vary by tread patterns and other features depending on the brand. They’re often used interchangeably.

Are all-terrain tires better in rain?

It depends. The tread design on all-terrain tires can prevent hydroplaning by channeling water away from the tire; however, performance in rain can still vary by the model and brand.

The information presented here is created independently from the TIME editorial staff. To learn more, see our About page.

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