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Best CFAR Travel Insurance for February 2024

CFAR Travel Insurance
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Updated February 15, 2024

For many of us, the pandemic reinforced the value of being as flexible as possible with our plans. That includes travel, where all kinds of incidents can throw a curveball at our itineraries.

To get the maximum flexibility in a travel insurance policy, consider a plan with cancel-for-any-reason (CFAR) coverage. A standard travel insurance plan covers cancellations only for specified circumstances outlined in the policy contract. But a plan with CFAR ensures you’ll be covered for any reason at all. Even if you simply change your mind and decide not to travel, you can file a claim with your insurer and receive at least some reimbursement for your prepaid, non-refundable travel costs.

CFAR can be an expensive option. You should explore plans carefully and choose one that offers the best combination of coverage at a cost that works for your budget. Here is our review of the best CFAR travel insurance plans for January 2024.

Compare the best CFAR travel insurance for January 2024

CompanyPlan nameBest forCost with CFARCost without CFARCFAR reimbursementOther coverage highlights
Aegis
Go Ready Choice
Pre-existing conditions
$435
$290
75% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
CFAR is packaged with pre-existing conditions waiver
AIG Travel Guard
Preferred
Rental car coverage
$419
$342
50% of trip cost
Optional “Wedding Bundle” coverage applies if wedding is canceled
Berkshire Hathaway
LuxuryCare
Luggage coverage
$858
$400
50% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
$2,500 coverage for lost luggage
Generali
Premium
Medical coverage
$710
$473
60% of trip cost
$250,000 medical coverage; Includes telemedicine services
John Hancock
Bronze
Low-cost option
$396
$264
75% of trip cost
Optional rental car coverage available
Seven Corners
Trip Protection Basic
Best overall for CFAR
$352
$248
75% of trip cost
Interruption for any reason (IFAR) coverage also available
Tin Leg
Gold
Active travelers
$746
$308
75% of trip cost (max $20,000 per traveler)
Package includes coverage for loss of sports equipment, loss of sports fees, and adventure sports coverage
Travelex
Travel Select
Traveling with children
$736
$370
75% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
Plan covers children under age 17 at no additional cost

Our recommendations

Best for pre-existing medical conditions: Aegis

Aegis

Aegis

Aegis

Cost with CFAR
$435
Cost without CFAR
$290
CFAR reimbursement
75% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
Other coverage highlights
CFAR is packaged with pre-existing conditions waiver

Aegis’s Pandemic Plus plan can be purchased with a CFAR coverage option. The CFAR option provides 75% reimbursement of up to $10,000 of non-refundable travel expenses. The plan also includes a pre-existing benefits waiver, providing coverage for medical emergencies related to chronic conditions.

Pros:

  • CFAR reimburses 75% of non-refundable expenses.
  • Company offers annual and single-trip plans.

Cons:

  • Rental car coverage is only available with more expensive plans.

Best for rental car coverage: AIG Travel Guard

AIG

AIG Travel Guard

AIG Travel Guard

Cost with CFAR
$419
Cost without CFAR
$342
CFAR reimbursement
50% of trip cost
Other coverage highlights
Optional “Wedding Bundle” coverage applies if wedding is canceled

CFAR coverage is available with the AIG Travel Guard Preferred plan. However, it reimburses only up to 50% of non-refundable travel expenses, which is the lowest percentage of the companies included in our review. From a cost perspective, the Preferred plan comes in around the middle.

Travel Guard does offer a generous $50,000 of optional rental car coverage. We quoted this option at $83 for one week of travel.

Pros:

  • $50,000 of rental car coverage available as an option.
  • Nice selection of available optional coverages, including those for pet owners, wedding travel, and adventure sports.

Cons:

  • Among the lowest CFAR reimbursement percentages.

Best for lost luggage: Berkshire Hathaway

Berkshire Hathaway

Berkshire Hathaway Travel Insurance

Berkshire Hathaway Travel Insurance

Cost with CFAR
$858
Cost without CFAR
$400
CFAR reimbursement
50% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
Other coverage highlights
$2,500 coverage for lost luggage

Berkshire Hathaway’s LuxuryCare plan offers CFAR with 50% reimbursement of non-refundable expenses. That’s among the lowest benefits in our review. And the plan is an expensive one, at $858 including the CFAR option.

But while the CFAR option isn’t among the best out there, you do enjoy a very generous $2,500 of coverage for lost luggage. That should help replace clothing and other personal items so you can continue your travels comfortably.

Pros:

  • $2,500 baggage coverage is among the highest of the companies we reviewed.
  • Plan includes a waiver for pre-existing medical conditions.

Cons:

  • Most expensive CFAR option.
  • CFAR benefit is among the lowest.

Best for medical coverage: Generali

Generali Global Assistance

Generali Travel Insurance

Generali Travel Insurance

Cost with CFAR
$710
Cost without CFAR
$473
CFAR reimbursement
60% of trip cost
Other coverage highlights
$250,000 medical coverage; Includes telemedicine services

The Generali Premium plan offers CFAR coverage as an option. The coverage provides reimbursement of up to 60% of non-refundable travel expenses. Where the plan really shines, however, is its medical coverage limits. The company provides $250,000 coverage for emergency expenses and $1 million for emergency transportation. Generali customers can also access 24/7 telemedicine services, providing virtual visits for non-emergency medical needs with a licensed U.S. physician.

Pros:

  • Medical coverage is among the highest.
  • Plan includes rental car coverage.

Cons:

  • CFAR benefit is on the lower end.

Best for low cost: John Hancock

John Hancock

John Hancock Travel Insurance

John Hancock Travel Insurance

Cost with CFAR
$396
Cost without CFAR
$264
CFAR reimbursement
75% of trip cost
Other coverage highlights
Optional rental car coverage available

The John Hancock Bronze plan offers a CFAR option at relatively low cost. But surprisingly, the level of coverage compares well with any of the plans in our review. The plan reimburses up to 75% of non-refundable travel costs. As a low-cost option, the John Hancock Bronze plan offers only $50,000 of medical coverage and $750 for lost luggage. However, higher coverage amounts are available with the company’s more expensive travel insurance plans.

Pros:

  • Generous CFAR coverage at a low cost.
  • $50,000 medical coverage available with the Bronze plan can be upgraded to $250,000.

Cons:

  • CFAR is not available to customers in New York.

Best overall for CFAR: Seven Corners

Seven Corners

Seven Corners

Seven Corners

Cost with CFAR
$352
Cost without CFAR
$248
CFAR reimbursement
75% of trip cost
Other coverage highlights
Interruption for any reason (IFAR) coverage also available

The Seven Corners Trip Protection Basic plan is our pick for the best overall CFAR coverage. Seven Corners reimburses up to 75% of non-refundable travel costs. The plan also offers an impressive $100,000 of medical costs, and an option for interruption for any reason (IFAR) coverage for just an additional $11 in our quote. And note that all of this is available with the company’s lowest-cost plan.

Pros:

  • Best combination of coverage and cost.
  • 24/7 emergency services and travel assistance included with all plans.

Cons:

  • Pre-existing medical condition waiver is available only with more expensive plans.
  • Baggage loss and delay coverages are lower than others.

Best for active travelers: Tin Leg

Tin Leg

Tin Leg Travel Insurance

Tin Leg Travel Insurance

Cost with CFAR
$746
Cost without CFAR
$308
CFAR reimbursement
75% of trip cost (max $20,000 per traveler)
Other coverage highlights
Package includes coverage for loss of sports equipment, loss of sports fees, and adventure sports coverage

CFAR coverage is an expensive option from Tin Leg. It is a $438 add-on, according to our quote, to the company’s Gold level travel insurance plan. For the money, however, you get reimbursement of 75% of your travel expenses up to $20,000. That’s the highest maximum limit in our review. We also like Tin Leg’s features for physically active travelers. These include coverage for equipment (bikes, skis, etc.), sports fees (such as race entry fees), and adventure sports.

Pros:

  • $20,000 max CFAR reimbursement.
  • $500,000 emergency medical coverage.
  • Sports coverages are ideal for active travelers.

Cons:

  • Among the most expensive CFAR options in our review.

Best for families with small children: Travelex

Travelex

Travelex Travel Insurance

Travelex Travel Insurance

Cost with CFAR
$736
Cost without CFAR
$370
CFAR reimbursement
75% of trip cost (max $10,000 per traveler)
Other coverage highlights
Plan covers children under age 17 at no additional cost

Small children add complexity to any travel itinerary. If you’re considering CFAR coverage for such a trip, check out Travelex. Its Select plan provides CFAR with 75% reimbursement of non-refundable expenses and a $10,000 limit. Travelex also covers children under age 17 on an adult’s plan at no additional cost.

Pros:

  • Plan covers children under age 17 at no added cost.
  • Includes coverage for pre-existing medical conditions.

Cons:

  • One of the most expensive plans.

Methodology

We reviewed plans that include a CFAR option from several leading travel insurance companies. Our research included quotes for two travelers, age 52, traveling to the United Kingdom for seven days in May 2024, at a total trip cost of $6,000. Our review shows each company’s lowest-cost plan that includes a CFAR option. We noted CFAR coverage levels, including the percentage of reimbursement of non-refundable travel expenses.

We also looked at other essential travel coverages offered by these companies. These included emergency medical expenses and useful options such as rental car coverage. Based on this information, we declared a “best of” for several categories.

What is CFAR and how does it work?

CFAR coverage supplements the standard trip interruption coverage on a travel insurance policy. Most standard travel insurance plans include trip cancellation coverage. This coverage is designed to reimburse your non-refundable, pre-paid trip costs if you have to cancel your trip prior to departure.

Typically, trip cancellation coverage applies only in specific situations. These situations are listed in the policy contract and include things such as an injury, illness, natural disaster, extreme weather conditions, or bankruptcy of a travel service provider. Provided you cancel due to one of the situations outlined in the policy, you can file a trip interruption claim and expect to receive reimbursement. If the situation that causes you to cancel isn’t on that list, however, it’s unlikely your insurance company will pay.

If your policy also includes CFAR coverage, you’ll be reimbursed for any possible reason, whether or not it’s listed in the contract. If, for instance, COVID-19 flares up at your destination and you decide to cancel your trip, you can be reimbursed. If your daughter’s basketball team unexpectedly makes the state finals and you want to cancel your vacation to watch her play, you can be reimbursed. If you just change your mind about the trip, you can be reimbursed.

Note that whereas standard trip interruption coverage usually reimburses 100% of your non-refundable costs, CFAR may reimburse only 50% to 75% of costs.

How to select the best CFAR coverage

Here are some tips to get the best CFAR coverage:

Consider the entire plan

CFAR is available from many leading travel insurance companies as an optional coverage with their standard plans. Some companies might require you to buy a more expensive base plan to qualify for a CFAR option. Shop around to make sure you’re not paying for coverage you don’t really need.

Check the cost of CFAR coverage

When comparing CFAR options available from various travel insurance companies, you’ll first want to make note of the cost. CFAR is typically an expensive add-on, but the cost does vary depending on what company you choose. In our review, the cheapest CFAR option cost $77. The most expensive one costs $458.

The lesson here? Shop around. Services such as Squaremouth and travelinsurance.com allow you to compare costs from multiple travel insurance companies.

Check the level of CFAR coverage provided

You’ll also want to consider the level of coverage provided. Typically, CFAR provides reimbursement for a percentage of your total non-refundable travel costs. In our review, these percentages ranged from 50% to 75% depending on the company. This can affect any claim payout by thousands of dollars.

TIME Stamp: CFAR offers maximum flexibility for your travel plans

CFAR coverage ensures your travel insurance policy reimburses you no matter why you decide to cancel—even if you do so for a reason not listed in your policy contract. However, it can be an expensive optional coverage, and payout percentages vary by insurance company. Consider your CFAR options carefully to make sure you get the coverage you need at a price that works for your travel budget.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

Is CFAR worth it?

CFAR coverage provides the maximum flexibility. But it comes at a price—according to our review, the most expensive CFAR option more than doubled the cost of the base insurance plan. So it’s natural to wonder if it’s really worth it. Consider how certain you are of your travel plans. Is it likely that something might crop up that will cause you to need to cancel? Consider also the refund policies for any prepaid fees, including airfare, hotel reservations, and entertainment. If these costs are non-refundable, CFAR might be a good idea.

Does cancel-for-any-reason travel insurance cover COVID-19?

There are a few scenarios related to COVID-19 that might affect your travel insurance:

  • You test positive for COVID-19 just prior to departure and decide to cancel.

In this case, standard trip interruption coverages will apply. You can file a claim and expect your insurer to reimburse your costs.

  • You test positive for COVID-19 while traveling, become ill, and need medical care. In this case, your plan’s emergency medical expense coverage should help pay for your medical costs.
  • You become ill with COVID-19 while traveling and need to quarantine.

\ Some plans include coverage to help pay for your additional lodging expenses related to a quarantine. Standard trip cancellation and trip interruption coverage may apply if you need to cut your trip short.

Also, if the COVID-19 infection rate spikes at your destination just prior to your departure date, and you decide to cancel your trip, most travel plans we’ve reviewed would not cover this scenario under their standard trip interruption coverage. You’d need a policy with optional CFAR coverage to be reimbursed.

Travel insurance plans vary. Check your plan carefully to understand what it does and doesn’t cover.

Does cancel-for-any-reason coverage really cover any reason?

Yes. Cancel-for-any-reason coverage applies to any reason, not just the ones outlined in your policy contract. Even if you simply change your mind and decide not to travel, your coverage should provide at least partial reimbursement of your non-refundable travel costs.

What if I don’t have CFAR but want to cancel my trip?

If your reason for cancellation is among those listed in your policy contract, you can file a claim with your insurer and expect reimbursement under your policy’s standard trip cancellation coverage. However, if the reason falls outside of those listed, you’re not likely to be reimbursed.

The information presented here is created independently from the TIME editorial staff. To learn more, see our About page.

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