TIME celebrity

6 Farm Dates We Need To See on Chris Soules’ Season of The Bachelor

Chris Soules was on the tenth edition of "The Bachelorette"
Chris Soules was on the tenth edition of "The Bachelorette" Craig Sjodin—ABC

Let's get hog wild, and other terrible puns.

ABC formally announced Wednesday that Chris Soules will be the leading man in its next season of The Bachelor. Let’s just call this season Farmer Gets a Wife. While we could have been living life in the fast lane with race car driver and Bachelor hopeful Arie Luydenyk Jr., instead we will be watching corn grow with Soules — a stable and successful farmer from quite possibly the smallest town in the world.

Last season, Soules’ mother assured Bachelorette Andi that “there’s no limit for a woman on a farm nowadays.” And we are sure that Bachelor producers, never shying away from a theme-date or pun, (pilot Jake Pavleka’s season was called On the Wings of Love, complete with its own eponymous song and everything), will be sure to teach us exactly what life on the farm would be like in the form of ridiculous date cards. This season on the Bachelor, the “surprise concerts” will be country, the strategically placed couches in the middle of the wilderness will be replaced with haystacks, and helicopters will be swapped out for tractors.

These are the farming dates we are the least, and by that I mean most, excited for:

Find a needle in a haystack
The winner of this group date is rewarded with one-on-one time and the promise of love everlasting, of course. The losers go home to cry and pick the hay out of each others’ hair. (Or, if there’s a hairdresser this season, learn how to incorporate them into elaborate braids for the Rose Ceremony).
Pun potential: I mean, implied

Catch a greased pig
Where mud wrestling meets Babe.
Pun potential: “Let’s get hog wild!” “I want to be his prize pig.”

Cook Chris a farm fresh breakfast using only products found on the farm
Chris told Andi that his wife doesn’t have to be a homemaker. The “big” city of Cedar Rapids is only an hour away. But let’s face it, knowing your way around a hen house and kitchen is going to be a plus.
Pun alert: “I am putting all of my eggs in this basket. Apart from the ones I’ve frozen. I really want to get married.”

A corn maze race
Especially appropriate considering that Chris grows corn.
Pun alert from the loser: “Shucks!”

Shear a sheep
The wise contestant will hoard her wool throughout the competition and give Chris a hand-knitted sweater toward the end of the season, shouting from the barn rooftops, “I choose ewe!”
Pun alert: “I’m in sheer disbelief that such a manly, gentle, gentleman farmer exists.”

Assist with the birthing of an animal
Just as contestants in past seasons have compared rappelling off the side of a building to rappelling into their potential mate’s heart, this date will be all about the metaphors. Like, “As I watched Chris pull a calf out of that cow’s vaginal canal, I realized, wow this guy has real fatherhood potential.”

Is it January yet?

TIME viral

Toddler Completes Ice Bucket Challenge, Nominates Dora the Explorer

Your move, Dora.

+ READ ARTICLE

By now, it seems just about everyone – celebrities, politicians, dogs — has participated in the Ice Bucket Challenge, the massively viral phenomenon raising money for ALS research. (The ALS Association says it has now raised more than $90 million to combat the disease.)

You might be a little sick of watching videos of people dumping water over their heads, but we recommend taking 45 seconds to watch the one above, uploaded by YouTuber Mike Weber. It features an adorable 2-year-old named Ashley who dons a pair of goggles and gamely completes the challenge. She nominates a few members of her family, and then also nominates Barbie and Dora the Explorer.

Your move, Dora.

TIME celebrities

Watch Laverne Cox Dance Like Nobody’s Watching During Beyoncé’s VMAs Performance

She really needs to be in Bey's next video

While Blue Ivy was doing some tasteful head-bobbing during Beyoncé’s VMAs performance, actress Laverne Cox was just rocking out.

While everyone around her sat quietly enjoying the show (including Kim Kardashian), the Orange Is the New Black star was on the next level. Up on her feet, waving her arms, wiggling her hips and singing along to “Blow,” it’s clear that she was having a better time than pretty much anyone in the audience.

Best. Ever. Cox is basically saying: All hail Queen Bey.

We hope Cox and Beyoncé become besties really soon (if they aren’t already) so Cox can star in Bey’s next music video and so Bey can make an appearance in an OITNB episode. Bey, if you’re out there, make it happen.

TIME Food & Drink

There’s a $10 Secret Menu Item at Arby’s Called the Meat Mountain

And it's quite literally a mountain made of ALL the meats

Well, this is truly the stuff of Ron Swanson’s wildest dreams. Arby’s has a secret menu item (meaning it’s not on the official menu but you can request it and they’ll make it for you) called the Meat Mountain. It’s a truly formidable tower of meats, and it all started because of this promotional photo:

Arby’s created that poster to remind consumers that the chain sells plenty of meats besides its famous roast beef, the Washington Post explains. This marketing strategy worked, apparently, because people started coming in asking if they could order that entire stack o’ meats. And lo, the Meat Mountain was born. Here’s what the $10 monstrosity-on-a-bun includes, from the bottom up:

  • 2 chicken tenders
  • 1.5 oz. of roast turkey
  • 1.5 oz. of ham
  • 1 slice of Swiss cheese
  • 1.5 oz. of corned beef
  • 1.5 oz. brisket
  • 1.5 oz. of Angus steak
  • 1 slice of cheddar cheese
  • 1.5 oz. roast beef
  • 3 half-strips of bacon

A few people have been brave enough to try it:

Unfortunately, the Meat Mountain doesn’t seem to be something all Arby’s employees know about just yet. The Wire’s Adam Chandler ventured to an Arby’s in Queens in search of this elusive meat monster and was met with blank stares. A manager told him the request was impossible. So he ordered everything required to assemble the Meat Mountain himself, spending $29 instead of the expected $10.

But can you really put a price on the incredible feat of scaling the formidable Meat Mountain?

TIME viral

Superman Proves He’s Superman By Hardly Wincing During The Ice Bucket Challenge

Henry Cavill and Amy Adams get doused multiple times

+ READ ARTICLE

On the set of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, multiple buckets and trash cans of ice water were dumped over Henry Cavill — who was in his Superman costume — and Amy Adams (Lois Lane).

The video is part of the “Ice Bucket Challenge,” a viral fundraising effort that has raised nearly $90 million by encouraging people to dump ice water over their heads on camera or donate $100 to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) research (or both, as lots of celebrities have done).

In the video, Amy Adams said she was nominated by actor Darren Le Gallo and challenged her siblings to do it next.

TIME NextDraft

The Awkward Part of The Emmys and Other Fascinating News on the Web

August 26, 2014

nextdraft_newsfeed_v2

1. Stolen Television

This is undoubtedly television’s golden age, but as The New Yorker’s Sarah Larson explains, its top TV awards show is still in its awkward stage. At least the Emmys is the most child-friendly awards show. (Especially if you have children in their 80s.)

+ No, you weren’t watching last year’s show on a DVR. Breaking Bad and Modern Family once again took home the top awards. If you’re looking for a big trend, consider this. Increasingly, the shows that win the biggest awards are on pay cable and/or some other service that charges viewers to watch. We are creating a new Couchtocracy where the best of television is available only to those who can afford it. Everyone else is stuck watching shows like the Emmys. And this trend is not limited to TV. I just read a story about television’s paywall behind a newspaper’s paywall.

+ Here is a look at all the winners, the seven moments you (sort of) need to watch, and everyone’s favorite, the list of folks who got snubbed. Jon Hamm has thirteen nominations and zero wins.

+ Sofia Vergara says the notion that her spinning around on a pedestal during the show was sexist is “ridiculous.” The Internet disagreed.

+ And with this tweet, Adam Shankman won the Emmys.

2. Back to Stool

It’s back to school time, and that means it’s time for parents to become extra cautious about food allergies. Food allergies have gone through the roof in recent years, and scientists are trying to find the root cause of the surge. A new study has identified a gut microbe that stops food allergies in rodents. “The research fits neatly into an emerging paradigm that helps explain a recent alarming increase in food allergies and other conditions, such as obesity and autoimmune disease.”

3. Truce

After weeks of fighting, Israelis and Palestinians have reportedly agreed to a long-term truce. Hamas called the truce a “victory for the resistance.” It’s hard to see how this was a victory for anyone.

4. More Than You Think

A couple of recent surveys asked people in countries around the world if they had a favorable view of ISIS. The numbers might surprise you. In France, 16 percent of those surveyed said they supported ISIS.

+ ISIS is demanding a $6 million ransom for a 26 year-old American woman.

+ NBC News on the American who died fighting for ISIS.

5. Less White After Labor Day

For the first time, white American students are returning to public schools during a term in which they will no longer represent the majority: “In autumn 2014 the proportion of white pupils is expected to have fallen marginally below 50% for the first time, with about 26% of pupils Hispanic and 15% black.

+ Some kids are still enjoying Summer. And in some places, that’s because of a really strong amusement park lobby.

6. The New Editors

Twitter and YouTube banned images and videos of James Foley’s murder. That choice, on its own, made sense. But who made big tech companies the new editors of what we do and don’t get to see on the Internet. In The Atlantic, Dan Gillmor provides an answer: We did.

+ The Intercept: Should Twitter, Facebook and Google executives be the arbiters of what we see and read?

7. The Kill Bill

California just became the second state to pass a mandatory “kill switch” bill which requires all cell phones sold in the state to enable their owner to render them useless in the case of theft.

+ Maybe the kill switch needs to be applied more broadly. We can’t even stop sleeping with our phones. (My phone must prefer sleeping with my kids, because I keep finding it their rooms.)

8. Contagion Two

In order to stress that the idea of pouring fresh water on one’s head seems crazy, actor (and water charity co-founder) Matt Damon decided to tweak the ice bucket challenge and dump a bucket of toilet water on his head. (It might have been easier to just write a check.)

+ Coke just abandoned India expansion plans due to a lack of water.

9. Yes, Your Honor

The owner of North Dakota coffee shop lets the place work on the honor system. The coffee and pastries are all self serve. The prices are listed on a sign. And from there, it’s up to the customers to pay whatever they want. The result: People tend to pay over the asking price.

10. The Bottom of the News

We started with TV. Let’s end with it. New research explains why should really shouldn’t feel guilty about watching all that television.

+ A gadget that stops plane seats from reclining caused a fight that resulted in a diverted flight.

+ Greatest guitar riff ever? A panel says it’s Whole Lotta Love. Special thanks to perhaps the greatest guitar player ever for going to eleven with this explanation: “There was this intent to have this riff and the movement of it, so it was menacing as well as quite sort of caressing.”

nextdraft

TIME animals

Lil Bub Stars in a Summer Version of the Yule Log

It's like Christmas in August

+ READ ARTICLE

In the dog days of summer, everyone is headed to the beach — including cat video stars.

If you’re stuck at home, or worse, in a cubicle, then consider watching a summer version of the Christmas Yule Log, featuring Lil Bub sitting on a towel on the beach, purring and snoozing in the sun. Her unique appearance is the result of a bone condition.

Fix yourself a pina colada, crank up the fans and start your streaming to experience a beach vacation without springing for two tickets to paradise.

MORE: Of Course There’s a Cat Version of the Yule Log

TIME Opinion

How to Reclaim the F-Word? Just Call Beyoncé

Beyonce performs onstage at the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum on August 24, 2014 in Inglewood, Calif.
Beyonce performs onstage at the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards at The Forum on August 24, 2014 in Inglewood, Calif. Jason LaVeris—FilmMagic/Getty Images

Beyonce’s brand of empowerment isn’t perfect, but her VMA performance on Sunday accomplished what activists could not: She took feminism to the masses.

Militant. Radical. Man-hating. If you study word patterns in media over the past two decades, you’ll find that these are among the most common terms used to talk about the word “feminist.” Yes, I did this — with the help of a linguist and a tool called the Corpus of Contemporary American English, which is the world’s largest database of language.

I did a similar search on Twitter, with the help of Twitter’s data team, looking at language trends over the past 48 hours. There, the word patterns were more simple. Search “feminist,” and you’ll likely come up with just one word association: Beyoncé.

That’s a product of Sunday’s MTV Video Music Awards, of course, in which the 33-year-old closed out the show with an epic declaration of the F-Word, a giant “FEMINIST” sign blazing from behind her silhouette.

As far as feminist endorsements are concerned, this was the holy grail: A word with a complicated history reclaimed by the most powerful celebrity in the world. And then she projected it — along with its definition, by the Nigerian feminist author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie — into the homes of 12 million unassuming Americans. Beyoncé would become the subject of two-thirds of all tweets about feminism in the 24 hours after her appearance, according to a data analysis by Twitter, making Sunday the sixth-highest day for volume of conversation about feminism since Twitter began tracking this year (the top three were days during #YesAllWomen).

“What Bey just did for feminism, on national television, look, for better or worse, that reach is WAY more than anything we’ve seen,” the writer Roxane Gay, author of the new book, Bad Feminist, declared (on Twitter, naturally).

“HELL YES!” messaged Jennifer Pozner, a writer and media critic.

“It would have been unthinkable during my era,” said Barbara Berg, a historian and the author of Sexism in America.

Feminism may be enjoying a particular celebrity moment, but let’s just remember that this wasn’t always the case. Feminism’s definition may be simple — it is the social, political and economic equality of the sexes, as Adichie put it — and yet its interpretation is anything but. “There was only about two seconds in the history of the world in which women really welcomed [feminism],” Gail Collins, The New York Times columnist and author of America’s Women once told me in 2010, for an article I was writing about young women and feminism. “There’s something about the word that just drives people nuts.”

Over the past 40 years in particular, as Berg explains it, the word has seen it all: exultation, neutrality, uncertainty, animosity. “Feminazi” has become a perennial (and favorite) insult of the religious right (and of Rush Limbaugh). In 1992, in a public letter decrying a proposal for an equal rights amendment (the horror!) television evangelist Pat Robertson hilariously proclaimed that feminism would cause women to “leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism, and become lesbians.”

Even the leaders of the movement have debated whether the word should be abandoned (or rebranded). From feminist has evolved the words womanist, humanist, and a host of other options — including, at one point, the suggestion from Queen Bey herself for something a little bit more catchy, “like ‘bootylicious.'” (Thank God that didn’t stick.)

It wasn’t that the people behind these efforts (well, most of them anyway) didn’t believe in the tenets of feminism — to the contrary, they did. But there was just something about identifying with that word. For some, it was pure naiveté: We were raised post-Title IX, and there were moments here and there where we thought maybe we didn’t need it. (We could be whatever we wanted, right? That was the gift of the feminists who came before us.) But for others, it was a notion of what the word had come to represent: angry, extreme, unlikeable. As recently as last year, a poll by the Huffington Post/YouGov found that while 82 percent of Americans stated that they indeed believe women and men should be equals, only 20 percent of them were willing to identify as feminists.

Enter… Beyoncé. The new enlightened Beyoncé, that is. Universally loved, virtually unquestioned, and flawless, the 33-year-old entertainer seems to debunk every feminist stereotype you’ve ever heard. Beyoncé can’t be a man-hater – she’s got a man (right?). Her relationship – whatever you believe about the divorce rumors – has been elevated as a kind of model for egalitarian bliss: dual earners, adventurous sex life, supportive husband and an adorable child held up on stage by daddy while mommy worked. Beyoncé’s got the confidence of a superstar but the feminine touch of a mother. And, as a woman of color, she’s speaking to the masses – a powerful voice amid a movement that has a complicated history when it comes to inclusion.

No, you don’t have to like the way Beyoncé writhes around in that leotard – or the slickness with which her image is controlled – but whether you like it or not, she’s accomplished what feminists have long struggled to do: She’s reached the masses. She has, literally, brought feminism into the living rooms of 12.4 million Americans. “Sure, it’s just the VMAs,” says Pozner. “She’s not marching in Ferguson or staffing a battered woman’s shelter, but through her performance millions of mainstream music fans are being challenged to think about feminism as something powerful, important, and yes, attractive. And let’s head off at the pass any of the usual hand-wringing about her sexuality — Madonna never put the word FEMINIST in glowing lights during a national awards show performance. This is, as we say… a major moment.”

It’s what’s behind the word that matters, of course. Empty branding won’t change policy (and, yes, we need policy change). But there is power in language, too.

“Looking back on those early days of feminism, you can see that the word worked as a rallying cry,” says Deborah Tannen, aa linguist at Georgetown University and the author of You Just Don’t Understand, about men and women in conversation. “It gave women who embraced [it] a sense of identity and community — a feeling that they were part of something, and a connection to others who were a part of it too. Beyoncé’s taking back this word and identifying with it is huge.”

Bennett is a contributing columnist at TIME.com covering the intersection of gender, sexuality, business and pop culture. A former Newsweek senior writer and executive editor of Tumblr, she is a contributing editor for Sheryl Sandberg’s women’s foundation, Lean In. You can follow her @jess7bennett.

TIME Family

It Took 9 Months to Make This Vine

A pregnancy in six seconds

There’s nothing as awe-inspiring as the creation of life — except for maybe this man’s dedication to creating this Vine.

Filmed over nine months, the mini-video documents a pregnancy from barely showing to baby toting. It’s Vine user Ian Padgham’s (@origiful) modern take on the staid old tradition of the pregnancy photo.

Padgham,whose day job involves making time-lapse clips on the social site for various brands, used his professional skill set to film his wife, Claire Pasquier, over the course of the nine months of her pregnancy. He captured her physical transformation in a six-second-long looping clip, shooting to frames at a time over nine months.

It’s a cool homage to family, life and technology, that has become one of the most viewed Vines of all time, with more than 12 million views so far.

MORE: Get “Happy” With This American Sign Language Performance of Pharrell’s Hit Song

MORE: Portland-Area Man Accused of Most Portlandian Crime Ever: Shoplifting With a Kilt

TIME society

Portland Plans Tiny Houses for the Homeless

Homeless in the Pearl
A person walks by the Right 2 Dream Too homeless camp in Portland, Ore. on Oct. 4, 2013. Don Ryan—AP

Designed to give residents greater privacy and independence than traditional shelters, the micro homes may persuade people who currently live in Portland's "tent cities" to relocate to the sturdier structures

With an estimated 2,000 of its residents sleeping under bridges, on streets and in empty lots in a variety of makeshift shelters, the city of Portland, Oregon, is on a quest to provide more safe housing for those without a permanent address. Thinking beyond typical dorm-style shelters, it has launched a task force that will meet September 4th “to assess the viability of using tiny homes as a potential for housing houseless people,” says Josh Alpert, Director of Strategic Initiatives for Mayor Charlie Hales. Alpert hopes the first batch of homes will be ready for occupancy by late February 2015.

The mayor’s office began looking into the idea of micro homes in June after housing advocate Michael Withey presented an idea to the city council based on designs by architecture firm TechDwell. Alpert says he envisions a pilot program in which up to ten structures are erected on four separate city-owned lots. The idea is to establish the micro communities in various neighborhoods “so that no one area is feeling overburdened,” Alpert adds.

TechDwell

The tiny houses will be selected through a request-for-proposals process and will hinge on two key factors: cost and the ability to meet city and county building codes. Tim Cornell of TechDwell, who has already met with Alpert to discuss his prototype, says he can deliver micro homes that sleep two people and have bathrooms and kitchens built-in for $20,000 each. His FlexDwell prototype (shown at right) measures 16 feet wide and 12 feet deep and features a sloped ceiling that is 12-ft. high in front. Made of prefab materials available at Home Depot and Lowe’s, it includes two sleeping pods joined by a kitchen, bathroom and eating area. To save space, the bathroom shares a sink with the kitchen. “We could have them built on-site in 45 days” after an order is placed, Cornell says.

Because the tiny houses offer dwellers more privacy than big shelters, they may appeal to people who are reluctant to give up the sense of independence that comes from living on the street. The micro homes could also be cheaper than temporary emergency shelters, which cost up to $16,000 a year and lack plumbing.

“If there is a potential to get even one person off the streets, it’s worth trying,” says Alpert. “Simply having a roof over their head may enable them to springboard into finding a job.”

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