TIME society

13 Secrets to Living Longer From the World’s Oldest People

Misao Okawa, the world's oldest Japanese woman poses for a photo with her great-grandchild Himaki and grandchild Takako Okawa on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home on March 4, 2015 in Osaka, Japan.
Buddhika Weerasinghe—Getty Images Misao Okawa, the world's oldest Japanese woman poses for a photo with her great-grandchild Himaki and grandchild Takako Okawa on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home on March 4, 2015 in Osaka, Japan.

Everything from olive oil foot massages to adding whiskey to your morning coffee

Misao Okawa, the world’s oldest person, celebrated her birthday with family at her Osaka, Japan, nursing home on Wednesday, a day before she officially turns 117. In the past, when asked to share her secret to long life, she has cited sushi and getting a good night’s sleep. This year, she simply said, “I wonder about that too.”

Here are other secrets to longevity that centenarians and super-centenarians have revealed in recent years:

“Believe in the Lord,” the third-oldest American Susannah Mushatt Jones, 115, shared with TIME during a visit to her Brooklyn home.

Pork, the second-oldest American, Jeralean Talley, 115, told TIME in 2013. Her signature dish is hog’s head cheese (pigs’ ears and feet in a jelly stock)

“Kindness,” the oldest American, Gertrude Weaver of Camden, Arkansas, revealed to TIME shortly after her 116th birthday.

• At 111 years old, Bernando LaPallo of Mesa, Ariz., massages his feet in olive oil.

• A Scottish 109-year-old Jessie Gallan advised “staying away from men” and eating porridge.

•Duranord Veillard, a 108-year-old from Spring Valley, N.Y., who has been married to his wife Jeanne for 82 years, gets up at 5:00 a.m. every day and does five to seven push-ups.

• Alexander Imich of New York City, formerly known as the world’s oldest man, said he didn’t drink alcohol.

• On his 115th birthday, the former oldest man in Japan, Jiroemon Kimura, attributed his longevity to sun-bathing.

Eating raw eggs, said 115-year-old Emma Morano of Verbania, Italy.

• Alfred Date, a 109-year-old Australian man, said knitting, is “a good way of getting along in life.” Recently, he knitted sweaters for injured penguins.

• During her 107th birthday celebrations, Downing Jett Kay of Baltimore said drinking lots of coffee was a big part of her long life.

• Richard Overton, who has been called the oldest living veteran, adds whiskey to his morning coffee and smokes up to 12 cigars a day, he claimed around his 107th birthday.

• When Adelina Domingues of San Diego was 114, she told U-T San Diego, “I’ve never been to a beauty shop and I’ve never been vain.

Read next: The New Age of Much Older Age

 

TIME viral

Here’s What It Would Look Like If Wes Anderson Directed an X-Men Movie

Mutants meet twee.

Have you ever found yourself wondering what it would look like if the X-Men trained at Royal Tenenbaum’s Harlem mansion? Or if Max Fischer was expelled from Rushmore and enrolled in Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters? Have you secretly hoped that Wes Anderson would take the reins of The Avengers franchise? Then this video is for you.

Patrick Willems just debuted a new fan film on his YouTube channel, and it attempts to answer the burning question on every Grand Budapest Hotel fan’s lips: What would it be like if Wes Anderson directed an X-Men movie? (That’s the question, because we already know what it would look like if Anderson directed Star Wars.)

The result is a very symmetrical, red-and-gold-filled film that plunks the Marvel mutants into a world of privileged prodigies with poor social skills. In short, it’s pretty great, if a little rough around the edges.

(h/t Bleeding Cool)

TIME Crime

Man Turns Himself In After Openly Taunting Police on Facebook

This criminal from Butler County, Ohio, has become something of an Internet sensation

When most people find out that there’s a warrant for their arrest, they try to lay low. But not 21-year-old Andrew Marcum, who was arrested this week in Butler County, Ohio, after getting into a social media spat with the police.

It all started when the sheriff’s office posted an alert on its Facebook page Monday about Marcum, who was wanted for charges including burglary, abduction and assault, NBC News reports. Here’s the posting:

The first person to comment? Marcum.

“I ain’t tripping half of them don’t even know me,” Marcum allegedly wrote. It’s not clear what that means, but the sheriff’s office Facebook page replied, “If you could stop by the Sheriff’s Office, that’d be great.”

Sheriff Richard Jones then decided to make this a cross-platform affair, sharing the following joke on Twitter:

Authorities were soon able to trace Marcum’s whereabouts and bring him into custody. The sheriff’s office Facebook page certainly got the last laugh:

 

TIME Australia

Part of Australia Might Change Time Zones to Avoid TV Spoilers

It's good for live-tweeting

The Australian government is considering changing South Australia’s time zone to align with the clocks of either Western Australia or the country’s eastern states.

“South Australia’s half-hour time difference to the eastern states and 90-minute difference to Western Australia can cause confusion across the spectrum of our daily lives—from sporting fixtures to public-service administration and business transactions,” South Australia Premier Jay Weatherill said in comments reported by the Wall Street Journal.

But there’s another reason the government thinks the change might be a good move: avoiding TV spoilers. “Most of us have a story about spoilers—like hearing the winner of MasterChef from an interstate friend just as the finale is getting interesting on our local TV station,” reads a government website calling for citizen input. “It puts us adrift of most other Australians.”

The region’s television industry is already on board. South Australia’s networks have turned in a joint statement in support of aligning with the eastern states, highlighting “the benefits of up to the minute national news and current affairs, and live social media interaction with popular programs,” according to Investment and Trade Minister Martin Hamilton-Smith.

Yes, the future of Australian time zones could just come down to live-tweeting.

[WSJ]

TIME Family

Mother of Toddler With Rare Disorder Fights Daughter’s Cyberbullies

The mother says her daughter is "not a monster"

A 2-year-old girl with a rare condition that affects her appearance, learning abilities and motor skills has become the target of Instagram cyber bullies.

Mariah Anderson recently celebrated her second birthday in Summerville, South Carolina, and was all smiles throughout the occasion, reports WCBD. So when the girl’s mother, Kyra Pringle, shared a shot online from her beaming daughter’s big day, she never imagined there would be a negative reaction.

Anderson was born with Chromosome 2p duplication syndrome, a condition that has affected her development and physical appearance. Unfortunately, when some Instagram users saw Pringle’s picture of her daughter, they did not celebrate the toddler, but instead teased her.

Several users posted memes using Pringle’s photo that poked fun at the toddler’s looks, insinuating that Anderson was ugly or resembled a leprechaun. Sick of seeing her baby girl being bullied by online trolls, Pringle decided to speak out against everyone making the memes and those enjoying them.

“The smile that you guys think is funny or the smile that you guys are comparing to a leprechaun,” Pringle told WCBD. “The things you guys are saying about my child, she’s not a monster, she’s real.”

Pringle hopes her words will help put an end to the harassment so she and her family can return to enjoying their time with Anderson which, because of her condition, could be limited.

“She’s just a joy, it’s a joy to have her right now,” said Kyra Pringle.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME Aging

The World’s Oldest Person Is Totally Chill About Turning 117

Misao Okawa, the world's oldest Japanese woman poses for a photo with her great-grandchild Himaki and grandchild Takako Okawa on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home on March 4, 2015 in Osaka, Japan.
Buddhika Weerasinghe—Getty Images Misao Okawa, the world's oldest Japanese woman poses for a photo with her great-grandchild Himaki and grandchild Takako Okawa on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home on March 4, 2015 in Osaka, Japan.

Misao Okawa was born on March 5, 1898

The world’s oldest person has lived through two World Wars and the invention of the first airplane, but it doesn’t seem like a long time to Misao Okawa.

“It seemed rather short,” Okawa said on Wednesday, the day before her 117th birthday, the Associated Press reports. When Okawa was asked about the secret to her longevity, she said nonchalantly, “I wonder about that too.”

Okawa was born in Osaka on March 5, 1898 and was recognized as the world’s oldest person by Guinness World Records in 2013. She has slowed down in recent months but still eats well and is healthy, according to her Osaka nursing home.

She married her husband, Yukio, in 1919, and has three children, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Her husband died in 1931.

Japan has more than 58,000 centenarians, more than any other country in the world.

[AP]

Read next: Europe’s Oldest Woman Says Being Single Helped Her Live to 115

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME portfolio

See Forgotten Amateur Photos Made into Art

Erik Kessels' books celebrate the power of amateur photography

No one in Erik Kessels’ latest book has a face. They have arms, sure; legs too — but absolutely no recognizable facial features. Why? In Almost Every Picture 14 is a work consisting almost entirely of scans of Polaroid pictures, ones that have huge circular holes punched right through their centers.

The images are the handiwork of a commercial photographer who worked on the beaches of Portugal in the 1980s. “He had a clipper,” Kessles says, “and he would clip a hole in the Polaroid and with the piece he removed he would make badges for the people on the beach.” When he’d finished selling, he adds, the lensman would discard the remains into a trash can. These were later discovered, and stored, by designer Toon Michiels who went on to collaborate with Kessels on the book.

This 14th edition of In Almost Every Picture is the most recent in the series Kessels has been producing since 2002. It consists of collections of amateur photographs re-purposed for a broad readership. In the first iteration, we saw vacation photos from a couple in the 1950s. In the second, we met an unnamed taxi cab passenger who has traveled across much of Europe. Later, in the eleventh, we saw a fully clothed woman half submerged in water. This is odd, offbeat work that is somehow obscure and everyday at once.

“An amateur is just someone who dares to make mistakes,” Kessels says. “Everything nowadays is pointing to perfection. The cameras on our phones, they make better picture than reality. They can document the darkest dark and the lightest light, things that we don’t even see with our eyes — which is great. But on the other hand, I like the flaws and the mistakes and the imperfection [with] amateur imagery”

Erik Kessels is a Dutch curator and editor. He is a founder of the advertising agency KesselsKramer. In Almost Every Picture is available now.

Richard Conway is reporter/producer for TIME LightBox

TIME Food & Drink

This Is Why Indian Food Is So Delicious

Holger Leue—Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images Thali dinner at Amrit Rao Peshwa Palace

It's the lack of overlapping flavors, scientists say

Indian food is lauded for its curries, mouth-burning spices and complex flavor pairings. With its use of cardamom, cayenne, tamarind and other pungent ingredients, the resulting taste combinations are unlike anything found elsewhere around the world. But scientists in India have now discovered exactly why Indian food is so good — it’s the fewer number of overlapping flavors in ingredients.

Researchers at the Indian Institute for Technology examined how frequently overlapping flavor compounds factored into a dish’s ingredients. They reviewed thousands of recipes on TarlaDalal.com, scrutinizing the subtle molecular-level differences that distinguish the cuisine, reports the Washington Post.

“We found that average flavor sharing in Indian cuisine was significantly lesser than expected,” researchers wrote.

In Western cuisines, ingredients are usually paired together for their similar flavors. However, an average Indian dish includes at least seven ingredients, most of which do not contain overlapping flavors. Cayenne, green bell pepper, coriander and garam masala are usually paired with ingredients that have no chemical overlap, but each ingredient brings a unique component when incorporated into the final meal. This creates knockout dishes for a cuisine that uses approximately 200 of the estimated 381 ingredients known in the world.

Read more at the Washington Post

TIME celebrities

See Vince Vaughn and Dave Franco in These Hilarious Stock Images

Sprinkle a soupçon of celebrity onto your next PowerPoint

Vince Vaughn and the cast of Unfinished Business are injecting some humor into the stilted, campy world of office-themed stock images.

In a partnership with Twentieth Century Fox, iStock by Getty Images has released a set of images that, if they didn’t feature the likes of Vaughn, Dave Franco and Tom Wilkinson, could easily be confused with those ever-inspiring pictures from office PowerPoint presentations.

“We hope these images bring a smile to people’s faces as they recognise classic business stock concepts with a twist,” said Craig Peters, General Manager of iStock by Getty Images in a press release.

Twelve images will be released during a three-week roll-out plan. Check out the first four, released Monday, and decide if your next meeting could use a Hollywood twist.

Unfinished Business, set for release on Friday, is a comedy following Vaughn and his new company as they try to land a big deal in Germany.

TIME movies

This Honest Trailer for The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Is Pretty Spot-On

"If you thought half a short book wouldn't have enough plot to carry a two-hour movie, you were right"

The clever folks who brought us “honest trailers” for movies like Gone Girl and Love Actually have a new target. This time, the Screen Junkies have offered its honest, snarky take on The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1.

“From the studio who’s casually redefined the word trilogy comes The Hunger Games like you’ve never seen them before… Hunger Game-less,” the voiceover guy begins. “If you thought half a short book wouldn’t have enough plot to carry a two-hour movie, you were right.”

The main criticism here is that basically nothing happens and the movie is full of filler (like Katniss repeating “President Snow? It’s Katniss” over and over.)

Oh, and according to this trailer, the whole movie is basically just watching Katniss “do everything she can to not cooperate” while moaning about her fake boyfriend who she disregarded until he gave her a ball.

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser