TIME France

Man Dies After Doing 56 Shots, Bartender Found Guilty of Manslaughter

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The drinker was attempting to set a record in his local bar

A bartender in France has been given a four-month suspended jail sentence after he served 56 shots to a customer who subsequently died, the Guardian reports.

Gilles Crepin, 47, was convicted of manslaughter after Renaud Prudhomme, 56, died after a drinking contest in October 2014 at a bar in the town of Clermont-Ferrand in central France.

The court was told that the bar displayed on a notice board the record number of shots that had been consumed on the premises and that Prudhomme wanted to beat the record.

Crepin admitted that the display was a mistake because it encouraged Prudhomme to go too far, the Guardian said.

Prudhomme suffered from alcohol abuse and respiratory complications that were unknown to the bartender. After downing the shots, he was rushed to the emergency room and died the next day in the hospital.

Crepin’s lawyer, who plans to appeal the sentence, said, “We can’t ask every customer who buys alcohol to present their medical certificates.”

However, counsel for Prudhomme’s daughter countered, “We want to remind some professionals that it is illegal to serve alcohol to clients who are in an advanced state of inebriation.”

Crepin has also been banned from working in bars for a year.

[Guardian]

TIME weather

This Woman Was Almost Struck by Lightning and Filmed It

Damn nature, you scary

A woman from Ireland got dangerously close to a bolt of lightning earlier this month when out filming a rainstorm for her mother.

Nicola Duffy, a lecturer at the Institute of Technology Blanchardstown in Dublin, was recording the heavy rain when a bolt of lightning appeared to explode on the opposite side of the courtyard, several meters from where she was standing, reports United Press International.

In the video you see a streak of light and hear a huge bang before Duffy falls to the ground in shock.

Because there was no visible damage done to the building, some at the college believe the lightning strike Duffy filmed was in fact a reflection — but nonetheless still very nearby.

Either way, it’s pretty scary and Duffy’s video has racked up almost 300,000 views on YouTube.

[UPI]

TIME society

Watch 100 Years of Indian Beauty in Less Than Two Minutes

Bollywood stars inspired many of the looks in this video

A video production company called Cut has released a video that aims to show how Indian fashion and style has evolved since the 1910s. In less than two minutes, Trisha Miglani, a dancer and student at the University of Pennsylvania, models a range of bindis, henna designs and looks inspired by Bollywood stars throughout the years such as Aishwarya Rai and Sharmila Tagore.

Past “100 years of beauty” segments have sought to enlighten the Internet about Persian, Korean and Mexican cultures, plus one about American style.

TIME animals

This Photobombing Bird Wants to Be a Fighter Jet So Bad

An amateur photographer snapped this epic image

A seagull photobombed an image of Red Arrows, Royal Air Force planes that do acrobatics displays, at the Llandudno Air Show in North Wales.

The bird is so perfectly aligned with the planes that it looks like it is powered by its own engine in this picture taken Saturday by Jade Coxon, an 18-year-old photography student at the University of Chester.

“It was mainly luck,” she told The Telegraph.

Seagulls have a history of photobombing horse races, family photos and traffic cameras. One even refused to fly away until its photo was taken, as one National Geographic photographer discovered.

TIME society

This Whimsical New Scrabble Ad Is the Perfect Love Story for Word Nerds

It tells a tale entirely through anagrams

She’s a cab driver; he’s a crab driver. She lives in Tokyo; he lives in Kyoto. Her name is Agostina; his is Santiago.

This whimsical 80-second video, part of a new Scrabble campaign, tells a little love story using some major wordplay. Anagrams are what link these two people and eventually bring them together — when they meet at a costume party, one dressed as a pineapple, the other as an apple pie.

The clip, posted on Mattel Games’ YouTube channel, was created by the agency Lola Madrid.

“The idea of using anagrams was a way to salute the intelligence of avid Scrabble players, but by using a love story, the spot became universal,” Pancho Cassis, executive creative director of Lola Madrid, told Adweek. “This communication was aimed at opening up to a broader audience, specifically younger players and non-players who spend a lot of time online but are seeking out offline experiences.”

Ultimately, according to Cassis, the goal is “to convey that words are magical and powerful, and that they connect us with people.”

Read next: ‘Lolz’ And Thousands Of Other Words Added to Scrabble Dictionary

TIME language

7 Things You Should Know About the 2015 Scripps National Spelling Bee

TIME's guide to the B-E-S-T week of the year

In the first on-stage round of the 2015 Scripps National Spelling Bee, only four of 283 kids heard the dreaded ring of the elimination bell. Most breezed through words like ubiquitous, flamenco, autopsy, howitzer and oregano at the front of a giant ballroom outside Washington, D.C. But when the spellers returned for the second on-stage round Wednesday afternoon, some adjustments had clearly been made to thin the flock.

Wearing giant placards and nervous grins, some 13-year-olds navigated the likes of panophthalmitis (inflammation involving tissues of the eyeball) and triumphantly threw their thin limbs in the air. Others held back tears after missing a vowel in the likes of guayabi (a highly valued hard tough wood from South America) and were politely sent off the stage with the same sound used to summon bellhops in fancy hotels.

By Thursday evening, when ESPN broadcasts the finals at 8 p.m. ET, there will be just a dozen spellers left. Here are seven things that will help viewers fully appreciate this harrowing, inspiring American ritual.

Americans are about three times more likely to be struck by lightning in their lifetime than to make it to the national finals. The odds of being zapped by lightning in one’s life are about one in 12,000, according to the National Weather Service. Of the 11 million kids who compete in the bee on some level, only 283 made it to the competition in National Harbor, Md., this year. That’s roughly 0.000026%, or one in 38,869.

There’s an app for that. Scripps, the sponsor of the bee, debuted an app called Buzzworthy this year. When you sign up, you’re automatically assigned five spellers that are essentially your fantasy football team for the competition. They spell words right, you get points. And each has an endearing bio so there’s no way to remain unattached. (Dear Jeffery “Eager to Embrace Tropical Flavors” Thompson: I’m counting on you.)

The process for picking the spelling words is top secret. The officials at Scripps who put on the bee guard their process for developing the word list like nuclear launch codes. There is a word committee, whose members are secret. The sources they use are secret. The qualities they look for are secret. “The nature of how that comes to be is something that needs to be protected,” says Scripps spokesperson Valerie Miller. There are whispers that some word committee members are dictionary officials, while others are former spelling champions themselves.

It is known that words get harder as the competition goes on. Words in the preliminary rounds come from study guides of about 1,500 words that are given to the spellers when they advance to the national finals. But once spellers get to the semi-finals and finals, the words they face could be any of the roughly 472,000 that are in Merriam-Webster’s Third Edition. When the contest comes down to three or fewer spellers in the final, officials advance to a special “championship list.”

There can be up to three co-champions of the bee. Once the spellers have advanced to the championship list of 25 words, there’s no other place to go. If everyone still in the game at that point spells all the words correctly as the officials go through the list, then everyone wins. That’s why there were two co-champions in 2014.

Spellers of South Asian descent have long dominated the bee. For the first time, bee director Paige Kimble recently talked about an obvious but sensitive trend: the spelling domination of Indian-American students. They’ve won the last seven years and all but four of the past 15 years, which led to some ugly comments on social media last year about “real Americans.” Miller says some research into the trend—by academics like Northwestern’s Shalini Shankar—has found that “grit” is the winners’ key attribute. Accomplishment, competition and early literacy are also important in South Asian cultures, Miller says: “When you pair up that love of competition with encouragement and emphasis on education, [spelling bees] are a natural fit.”

The real killer at the bee isn’t nerves; it’s the schwa. There are some obvious characteristics that make words tough to spell, like silent letters (mnemonic), double letters (braggadocio) or single letters where you might expect double letters (sassafras). But the true nemesis of spellers is the schwa, the vowel sound that we hear in words like America, belief and history. The schwa can be rendered as any vowel and even be silent in words like rhyth(ə)m. “The schwa is the richest source of guesses in the final rounds, the most common source of confusion,” says Merriam-Webster’s Peter Sokolowski. “These are championship spellers and that’s the most common error at highest, highest level.”

TIME animals

Texas Grandmother Reunited With Poodle Trapped at Home During Floods

Lena Givens was unable to get to her house where "Tinkerbell" was locked in a kennel

Lena Givens, 84, was at a Houston Rockets game Monday night when the skies opened, submerging multiple counties in record-breaking rains.

The resulting flood that has killed at least 18 in Texas and Oklahoma left the grandmother stranded and unable to get to her house where her poodle Tinkerbell was locked in a kennel.

Just before the end of game, a message flashed on the scoreboard warning fans to stay put due to severe weather outside, NBC News reports.

“I stayed in the lobby of the hotel for at least probably three or four hours,” she told Houston’s KRPC.

When she was able to call a car to get home, she found the road to her neighborhood was impassable. Givens worried about her beloved pet that had been trapped in her flooded house for over 12 hours.

Her grandson Brian Gardner was able to borrow a friend’s boat to reach Givens’s home and look for Tinkerbell.

After hours of worrying, Givens finally got the good news she was hoping for – her dog was safe.

“[Tinkerbell”] was floating on a chair in the living area. She got out of the kennel somehow and she was floating in a chair,” she told the news station.

Watch video of Givens and Tinkerbell reunion below.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME celebrity

You Can Soon Buy Tina Fey and Amy Poehler Action Figures

Broadway Video

Because they are society's true superheroes

Want to recreate the magic of Amy Poehler and Tina Fey’s beautiful best friendship? Of course you do. Want to pretend they’re both still manning the Weekend Update desk at Saturday Night Live? Duh.

Finally, you’ll be able to do that with these nifty new Tina and Amy action figures, created by toy company Bif Bang Pow!

That’s right, it’s your favorite comedy duo as miniature plastic figurines. They also come with a Weekend Update desk, because obviously.

Sadly, the action figures won’t be on sale until July. They’ll first be available at San Diego Comic-Con, from July 8 to 12, at the Entertainment Earth booth. (You can also pre-order them now for $29.99.)

Try to contain your excitement till July.

Read next: Watch Amy Poehler and Tina Fey Joke About Bill Cosby at the Golden Globes

TIME Food & Drink

Delta Ordered Pizza for Passengers on Delayed Flights

After bad weather grounded or cancelled flights

When inclement weather delayed Delta flights nationwide on Tuesday, the crews ordered pizzas.

Passengers like Riley Vasquez, whose plane to Atlanta got diverted to Knoxville, Tenn., have been sharing pictures of these impromptu “pizza parties” on social media:

The airline experienced more than 100 flights cancellations and more than 650 delays on Tuesday, CNN reported via data from the flight-tracker FlightAware.

What makes a few hour delay of your night flight better? Free pizza! Thanks @delta #MLItoATL #pizza

A photo posted by Jill (@jill_hohnecker) on

Earlier this month, ABC News reported a similar pizza party took place on a Delta flight that was diverted to Charleston after the cabin was enveloped in smoke.

TIME Television

The Ripley Book Series Will Be Adapted for Television

Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

Patricia Highsmith's thrillers will come to life again, this time on TV

It’s been more than 15 years since a film adaptation of Patricia Highsmith’s novel The Talented Mr. Ripley raked in nearly $130 million at the box office with Matt Damon playing the title role. Now Highsmith’s entire Ripley series—five novels also known as the Ripliad—will be adapted for TV by Television 360, Endemol Shine Studios and the publisher Diogenes.

The remake doesn’t yet have a writer, director or major star attached, and, according to the Hollywood Reporter, its producers will likely wait until talent is locked in to find the series a home.

This is not the first time Highsmith’s work will be adapted for television. The Talented Mr. Ripley, a psychological thriller about a con artist, was adapted for TV in 1956, the year following its publication. Parts or all of the Ripliad have also been adapted for radio and theater.

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