TIME viral

This Video Captures Everything Wrong With Overblown Tech Hype

Ever heard of the MyBook?

Forget about the Apple Watch. What about the MyBook?

Never heard of it? In spoof video above, Twitter co-founder Biz Stone drops hints at, as an interviewer describes it, a “secret tablet-sized object you had in your hand at Disrupt?”

“My book?” Stone asks.

“The MyBook!” And that’s all it takes for the fanboys to being hyping up the most mysterious and disruptive product on the market.

Influential angel investor Ron Conway is behind the funny video launching One City, an initiative that asks tech companies to invest in their own communities. This pitch-perfect spoof touts a program that partners companies with schools, and it hilariously captures the zeitgeist surrounding tech products and begs the question: “What if schools were the next big thing in tech?”

 

TIME viral

Watch an 11 Year Old Perform a Killer Choreographed Dance to Nicki Minaj’s ‘Anaconda’

It's awesome, even if the song's subject matter isn't exactly, uh, tween-friendly

Sia hired an 11-year-old dancer to perform a ridiculously great dance routine in the video for her smash hit “Chandelier” — and maybe Nicki Minaj should have done the same thing for her “Anaconda” video. Just kidding, that probably would have been weird given the video’s, er, graphic nature. But if Nicki does decide to hire a tween dancer in the future, she should give Taylor Hatala a shout.

In the video above, 11-year-old Hatala — who her instructor Laurence Kaiwai describes as a “beast” — delivers a totally killer performance to “Anaconda” alongside Kaiwai, who choreographed the routine. The song and its lyrics clearly are not the most tween-friendly material, but at a certain point you kind of just forget that Hatala is 11 because whatever. She totally nails it.

 

TIME Advertising

This ‘Bra Cam’ Shows How Often Women’s Breasts Get Ogled

Nestlé created video in honor of October's Breast Cancer Awareness month

In honor of October’s Breast Cancer Awareness month, Nestlé FITNESS launched a campaign encouraging women to #CheckYourSelfie.

How did the company drill the message home? By chronicling how often people ogle women’s breasts by implanting a camera in a bra. And it turns out that the volunteer’s breasts get checked out a lot, by men, women, babies, and dogs, alike.

To be fair, though, the woman in the video is walking around with a bright pink bra sticking out of her shirt, which is likely to draw attention — although far be it from us to knock a breast cancer awareness campaign.

This isn’t Nestlé’s first go at smart-bra innovation. In 2013, the company created a bra that tweets every time it gets unclasped:

We can only imagine what undergarment-related promotions 2015 will hold.

TIME celebrity

Watch Alex Trebek Make a Hilarious Mistake on Jeopardy! in an Unaired Clip

"I don't even know where the hell I am today! That's never happened before."

Jeopardy! posted a YouTube video of Alex Trebek bungling contestants’ names during a taping of the interview portion of the show.

In a snafu that never aired, he calls a woman by the wrong name and starts chatting her up about her recent trip to the Tower of London. She tells him she went with it instead of correcting him because “I just wanted to make you feel good.”

Looking dumbfounded, he then tells the audience he knows almost nothing going into each show. “I don’t even know where the hell I am today!” After more laughter ensues, he adds, “That’s never happened before.”

MORE: Alex, I’ll Take “How to Invest Like a Jeopardy Champ” for $1000

MORE: Find Jeopardy’s! Most Popular Clues Over 30 Years

MORE: Trebek Trolls Us All By Making ‘Final Jeopardy’ Question About the Pronunciation of ‘GIF’

TIME viral

Student’s Dream of Epic Yearbook Cat Photo Comes True

His wish was granted after an online petition went viral

Earlier this month, NewsFeed reported that Draven Rodriguez, a student at Schenectady High School in upstate New York, was asking the school’s administration to let him pose with his cat, Mr. Bigglesworth, in his senior portrait. An online petition with the photo below only needed 500 signatures to “pass,” but ended up going viral and racking up more than 7,400 signatures.

Vincent Giordano / Trinacria Photography

Now CBS6 reports that the petition worked! Well, sort of! The bad news is the photo still can’t be his senior portrait, but the good news is the school principal Diane Wilkinson posed for a new epic photo with Rodriguez and her pet chihuahua Vivienne that will go on her yearbook page to encourage animal rescue and adoption. Behold:

Vincent Giordano/Trinacria Photography

 

TIME Food & Drink

America’s Greatest Cookbook

A 10 year old compiled recipes from Chris Christie, Rick Perry, Bobby Jindal and 23 other governors

When most children hear “school project,” they think cardboard dioramas and baking soda volcanoes. But others? They aspire to greatness.

Such was the case with one Miss Lauren Wu, 10, of San Carlos, Calif., who asked every U.S. governor for his or her favorite recipe. Twenty-six said yes. (Twenty-seven if you count Hawaii, who came in past the deadline.) The below cookbook is the result.

“American Cooking” speaks to the nation’s deeply engrained culinary traditions—Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley submitted a recipe for crab cakes; Florida Gov. Rick Scott sent two variations on Key Lime pie.

But it also reveals much about the personal and professional priorities of those governors who did not participate. If Chris Christie found time to send his blueberry French strata recipe on April 1, while he was deep in the muck dealing with Bridgegate scandal, what excuse do his non-participating peers have?

Miss Wu, however, is not one to hold a grudge. “The governors are all very busy,” she says, “and I don’t know, I’m sure they get a bunch of emails every day.”

She embarked on this project to learn more about cooking, and has already tried a number of the recipes at home. So far, her favorite has been Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead’s chocolate chip cookies. “We usually have chocolate chip cookies at our house,” she says, “but these were different—they were really fluffy and good.”

In the above video, she watched her friend and TIME staffer Joel Stein try his hand at Christie’s strata. As for O’Malley’s native dish, Wu says, “The crab cakes weren’t my favorite, because I’m not a huge fan of crab, but they were good still.” Plenty of experimentation remains ahead: “There are a lot of good options. Maybe I’m gonna try Maine’s blueberry pie, or maybe Florida’s Key Lime pie. I’m probably gonna try a pie of some sort.”

Wu intends to participate in the program that invited her to do this optional project again next year, when she will be in sixth grade. By then, there’s no doubt she’ll have the clout to get recipe submissions from the likes of Angela Merkel and Kim Jong-un.

American Cooking

 

TIME celebrity

Listen to Aretha Franklin’s Powerful Cover of Adele’s ‘Rolling in the Deep’

Some listeners suspect that the legendary singer is being Auto-Tuned

On her upcoming album, Aretha Franklin Sings the Great Diva Classics, the iconic songstress takes on 10 tracks originally written and performed by fellow female powerhouse vocalists. This week, Aretha shared the first single off the album. It’s a big, fiery, loud cover of a big, fiery, loud song: Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep.” (The song also manages to incorporate pieces of “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.”)

This is pretty exciting, yes, but some listeners have raised concerns about a possible use of Auto-Tune in this track. Auto-Tune, of course, is a device used to alter or enhance a singer’s pitch, and it’s understandable why people would be concerned about this, as Aretha Franklin is widely considered one of the greatest singers of all time. Many commenters were quick to point out that even if the track doesn’t include Auto-Tune itself, Aretha’s voice still sounds like it was enhanced in some way.

Either way, she’s still the Queen of Soul, and she still sings her heart out.

The album is out Oct 21, and we’ve heard that it includes a cover of Sinéad O’Connor’s “Nothing Compares 2 U,” so get excited.

TIME movies

There Will Be a Tetris Movie, and it Will Be ‘Epic’

Game Boy Game "Tetris"
The cover of Nintendo Game Boy game, "Tetris." Boston Globe—Boston Globe via Getty Images

"What you [will] see in Tetris is the teeny tip of an iceberg that has intergalactic significance."

Are you sitting down? Please, tell me you’re sitting down. Because, the Wall Street Journal reports, Tetris will be coming to a theater near you.

No, not for a World Cup competition — the company is determined to turn the classic blockbusting game into a spectator sport — but for a movie. That’s right, there is going to be a Tetris movie. And according to Threshold Entertainment CEO Larry Kasanoff, “It’s a very big, epic sic-fi movie.”

While we don’t know what to expect, Kasanoff, who turned Mortal Kombat into a film in 1995, told the WSJ what we shouldn’t expect. “This isn’t a movie with a bunch of lines running around the page,” he said. “We’re not giving feet to the geometric shapes . . . What you [will] see in Tetris is the teeny tip of an iceberg that has intergalactic significance.”

May this please open the door for other spinoffs of Marble Madness and Pong, too. Blip. Blip. Bloop.

[WSJ]

TIME animals

Dolphins Are Apparently Attracted to Magnets

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Dolphin in aquarium of Barcelona vdorse—Getty Images/Flickr RF

Where does this fit into their plot for world domination?

According to a French study released Monday, dolphins are attracted to magnets. Platonically, of course.

To find out if dolphins are magnetosensitive—or able to sense Earth’s magnetic field—researchers tested how six bottleneck dolphins swimming freely independently reacted to barrels containing both magnetized and demagnetized blocks.

Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

If the findings hold up to scrutiny, it would be a momentous discovery. Although many animals are suspected to orient themselves using the Earth’s magnetic pull, there’s precious little proof that this is the case. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine concluded in 2012 that pigeons have magnetosensitive GPS cells in their brains.

We don’t quite know where this fits into dolphins’ plot to take over the world, but now that they might be working with the pigeons, we are utterly terrified.

TIME Bizarre

The 35 Most Surprising Photos of the Month

From eating ice cream in the senate to kissing Tony Bennett, each photograph will give you an intriguing experience, as TIME shares the most outrageous images from September 2014

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