TIME Transportation

This Glow-in-the-Dark Spray Could Make Cycling at Night Way Safer

A new safety initiative being tested in the U.K.

Car giant Volvo is turning in a slightly different direction for its next project: cycling safety.

Last week, the automaker and its partners unveiled a reflective spray called LifePaint, which cyclists can spray on their clothes and bicycles to boost safety at night. The spray, which is reflective for up to 10 days, is invisible in daylight but becomes bright white at night when a car shines its lights on a treated surface.

LifePaint, created in partnership with design firm Grey London and Swedish startup Albedo100, is in trials at six cycle shops in London and Kent. If it proves popular with cyclists, Grey London said in a statement, the project will expand domestically and beyond the U.K.

MONEY Food & Drink

Diet Coke Loses Its Fizz to Pepsi

Data from Beverage Insider shows more Americans are purchasing Pepsi than Diet Coke, making it the second most popular soda in the U.S.

TIME Television

Watch ‘The Rock Obama’ Throw John Boehner Through a Window on SNL

And see the first appearance of "She Rock Obama"

Dwayne Johnson reprised his role as “The Rock Obama” on the March 28 episode of Saturday Night Live.

In the cold open sketch, the “normal” President Barack Obama (Jay Pharoah) loses his temper with House Speaker John Boenher (Taran Killam), who unilaterally invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address Congress; Texas Senator and 2016 presidential candidate Ted Cruz (Bobby Moynihan), who called Netanyahu an “extraordinary leader” upon his recent election victory; and Sen. Tom Cotton, who sent a letter to Iran behind Obama’s back regarding a potential nuclear deal.

The President then transforms into “The Rock Obama” (Johnson—”Oh my god, it’s happening!” exclaims Michelle (Sasheer Zamata)—before he shows his political foes who’s in charge. But it turns out the President isn’t the only one with a hulky alter ego: find out who angers Michelle so much that she transforms into “She Rock Obama” (Leslie Jones).

TIME France

Struggle to Explain Motivation of Co-pilot in Germanwings Crash

"We don't have a clue what was going through his mind"

(LONDON) — A disgruntled worker shoots up a workplace. A student opens fire at a high school. A pilot crashes a planeload of people into a mountainside.

There may never be a convincing explanation for such devastating acts of violence, but experts say certain personality disorders such as extreme narcissism can help push people who want to take their own lives to take those of others at the same time.

But as German prosecutors search for what might have motivated co-pilot Andreas Lubitz to deliberately smash the Germanwings plane carrying 149 other people into the French Alps, many experts caution against speculating on a diagnosis.

“We don’t have a clue what was going through his mind,” said Dr. Simon Wessely, of the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London. “Even if we had all of his medical records and had conducted interviews with him, it would probably still be impossible to explain such an inexplicable act.”

Ripped-up sick notes from a doctor found at Lubitz’s home by German prosecutors suggest the27-year-old had an illness he hid from his employers at Germanwings. Medical documents showed he had an existing illness — which wasn’t specified — but no suicide note was found. A Dusseldorf hospital confirmed Friday that Lubitz had been treated recently, but didn’t say for what.

Neighbors of Lubitz were shocked at allegations he could have deliberately smashed the plane and said he had seemed thrilled with his job at Germanwings. They described a man whose physical health was excellent and records show Lubitz took part in several long-distance runs. Germanwings said he had passed all required medical check-ups.

Some experts said it was possible that people who commit such horrific acts of violence might be suffering from mental illnesses like narcissism or psychosis.

Dr. Raj Persaud, a fellow of Britain’s Royal College of Psychiatrists, says that in cases of mass murder, people sometimes suffer from personality disorders that make them extremely self-centered. He and others were speaking generally and had no personal knowledge of the Lubitz case.

“People feel that something so terrible has been done to them that this catastrophic act is warranted in exchange,” he said. “To them, it feels like the correct balance to equal what they suffered.”

Others said that preventing such chilling acts of violence may be nearly impossible if there aren’t any obvious warning signs or if the person is able to hide their symptoms.

“People can become quite skilled at masking their problems because it’s socially undesirable,” said Dr. Paul Keedwell, a psychiatrist who specializes in mood disorders at Cardiff University.

Keedwell said it would be unwise to assume Lubitz’s deliberate plane crash was an aggressive act.

“It’s difficult to understand, but what if he was just so wholly preoccupied with ending his own life he didn’t have any regard for the other people on the airplane?” he said.

He likened it to people who throw themselves in front of trains without considering the trauma that might inflict on the driver and other passengers.

Some experts said mass murders are intended by the killer to do maximum damage, to draw attention to themselves.

“The subject wins fame by doing something the world will remember, even if it’s as a negative hero,” said Dr. Roland Coutanceau, president of the French League for Mental Health.

He said such acts are sometimes committed by paranoid people angry with their employer or with society at large.

“This is a destructive act that (gives) him some kind of immortality,” Coutanceau said. “Death is therefore part of his script.”

___

Philippe Sotto in Paris contributed to this report.

Read next: German Co-Pilot Visited Alps Near Crash Site as a Child

TIME Nigeria

Nigerians Continue Voting After Violence and Technical Hitches

Millions have cast ballots in an election that analysts say is too close to call

(ABUJA, Nigeria) — Voting in Nigeria’s elections continued in certain areas on Sunday after technical problems prevented some people from casting their ballots on Saturday.

More than 40 people were killed in election-related violence Saturday, though millions were able to cast ballots in a presidential election that analysts say is too close to call.

Voting was extended in about 300 of the country’s 150,000 polling stations, including some areas of Lagos, Nigeria’s megacity of 20 million on the Atlantic coast, according to the country’s electoral commission. The extended voting was necessary because new voting equipment failed to confirm voters’ identities.

Boko Haram extremists killed 41 people, including a legislator, and scared hundreds of people from polling stations in the northeastern Nigeria. In electoral violence elsewhere, three people including a soldier were shot and killed in southern Rivers state and police said two car bombs exploded at polling stations in the southeast but no one was injured.

Nearly 60 million Nigerians have cards to vote and for the first time there is a possibility that a challenger can defeat a sitting president in the high-stakes contest to govern Africa’s richest and most populous nation.

The front-runners among 14 candidates are President Goodluck Jonathan, a 57-year-old Christian from the south, and former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari, 72, from the predominantly Muslim north.

Voters also are electing 360 legislators to the House of Assembly, where the opposition currently has a slight edge over Jonathan’s party. Voting for 13 constituencies was postponed until April because of shortages of ballot papers, electoral officials said.

Nigeria’s political landscape was transformed two years ago when the main opposition parties formed a coalition and for the first time united behind one candidate, Buhari. Dozens of legislators defected from Jonathan’s party.

Even the president was affected by the technical hitches on Saturday. Three newly imported card readers failed to recognize the fingerprints of Jonathan and his wife. Biometric cards and readers are being used for the first time to discourage the kind of fraud that has marred previous votes.

Afterward, Jonathan wiped sweat from his brow and urged people to be patient as he had been, telling Channels TV: “I appeal to all Nigerians to be patient no matter the pains it takes as long as if, as a nation, we can conduct free and fair elections that the whole world will accept.”

Most Nigerians exercised extraordinary restraint, waiting hours in heat that rose to 100 degrees (37 degrees Celsius) in some places. Many remained for more hours after voting ended to witness the ballot count, determined to do their part to try to keep the elections honest.

“The high voter turnout and the dedication and patience of Nigerian voters is, in itself, a triumph of Nigerian democracy,” said the national counter-insurgency spokesman, Mike Omeri. He praised the bravery and commitment of military and security agencies that he said made the elections possible.

Struggling with power blackouts that are routine, some officials counted ballots by the light of vehicles and cellphones.

A major campaign issue has been Boko Haram’s Islamic insurgency. The failure of Jonathan’s administration to curb the rebellion, which killed about 10,000 people last year, has angered many Nigerians.

International outrage has grown over another failure — the government’s inability to rescue 219 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram nearly a year ago. The extremists have abducted hundreds more people since then, using them as sex slaves and fighters.

The Islamic uprising has exacerbated relations between Christians like Jonathan, who dominate the oil-rich south, and Muslims like Buhari, who are the majority in the agricultural and cattle-herding lands of the north. Nigeria’s population of 170 million is almost evenly divided between Christians and Muslims.

Some 1,000 people were killed in rioting after Buhari lost to Jonathan in the 2011 elections. Thousands of Nigerians and foreign workers have left the country amid fears of post-election violence.

In 2011, there was no doubt that Jonathan had swept the polls by millions of votes. Now the race is much closer. Results are expected 48 hours after voting ends. If no clear winner emerges, a runoff will be held.

___

Umar reported from Maiduguri. Associated Press writers Jerome Delay in Kaduna, Shehu Saulawa in Bauchi, Adamu Adamu in Potiskum, Lekan Oyekanmi in Yola, Hilary Uguru in Port Harcourt, and Ben Curtis in Daura, also contributed to this report.

TIME Singapore

Singapore Bids Farewell to Lee Kuan Yew in Elaborate Funeral

"He did everything for us Singaporeans regardless of race, language or religion"

(SINGAPORE) — Tens of thousands of Singaporeans undeterred by heavy rains lined a 15 kilometer (9 mile) route through the Southeast Asian city-state to witness an elaborate funeral procession Sunday for longtime leader Lee Kuan Yew.

Lee’s coffin, protected from the downpour by a glass casing, lay atop a ceremonial gun carriage that was being led solemnly past city landmarks from parliament to a cultural center where the state funeral will be held. Walking slowly in the coffin’s wake as it exited parliament were Lee’s son, the current prime minister Lee Hsien Loong, other family members and government officials.

Crowds of people that began forming not long after dawn for the early afternoon funeral cortege chanted “Lee Kuan Yew” and waved Singapore’s national flag. Four howitzers fired a 21-gun salute, air force fighter jets streaked over the island and navy patrol ships blasted horns.

During a week of national mourning that began Monday after Lee’s death at age 91, some 450,000 people queued for hours for a glimpse of the statesman’s coffin at Parliament House. A million people visited tribute sites at community centers around the city.

The expansive show of emotion is a rare event for Singapore. The island nation about four times the size of Washington D.C. is known around the world as a wealthy trade and finance center with a strict social order including a ban on chewing gum and caning for some crimes.

Lee was Singapore’s prime minister for more than three decades, ruling with an iron grip until 1990, and is regarded by Singaporeans as the architect of their nation’s prosperity and harmonious race relations. But his authoritarian rule has also left a legacy of restrictions on free speech, a tame media and a stunted democracy.

“He did everything for us Singaporeans regardless of race, language or religion,” said Jennie Yeo, a 58-year-old teacher, who arrived at 7 a.m. to stake out front row positions with two friends. “Education, housing, everything you can think of, he’s taken care of for us,” she said.

Leaders and dignitaries from more than two dozen countries are attending the state funeral. The U.S. delegation is led by former President Bill Clinton. Abroad, India has declared a national day of mourning and in New Zealand, the government is flying flags at half-staff.

During the funeral service, civil defense sirens will blare across the island to begin a minute’s silence.

TIME Aviation

Grim Recovery Mission Underway at Germanwings Crash Site

"We have not found a single body intact"

SEYNE-LES-ALPES, France (AP) — The ravine echoes with helicopter rotors, the scrape of metal on stone, the rumble of sliding scree as the remnants of Germanwings Flight 9525 dislodge from the mountainside.

The somber mission to recover the remains of 150 people killed when their plane slammed full speed into the Col de Mariaud is not a quiet one, and evidence can be gathered only when the mountains cooperate.

From 8:30 a.m. until 6 p.m., while the light is good, the helicopters ferry the crews into the ravine. It is too steep to land, so the 40 crewmembers are winched down singly or in pairs with packs bulging with clear plastic bags, red and yellow evidence tags, and the ropes they will use to keep each other from slipping when the black Alpine stone crumbles beneath their feet. Each investigator is linked to a local mountaineer, familiar with the terrain and with the skills to keep them safe.

Few pieces are larger than a car door. Most are smaller. And with each step the recovery workers make, crucial pieces of evidence slide inexorably downward. Some slip into a mountain brook fed by the snow that has only just begun melting in the French Alps.

“We have not found a single body intact,” Col. Patrick Touron, one of France’s leading forensic investigators, said Friday from Seyne-les-Alpes. “DNA will be the determining element that will lead to identification.”

Between 400 and 600 biological elements have been retrieved and five scientists are in Seyne-les-Alpes to speed the process, he said. The families who arrived during the week provided objects such as toothbrushes, which belonged to the deceased, and some gave their own DNA samples to help cross-reference the forensic information found in the remains.

The moment a piece of human remains is found, forensic scientists have been taking a DNA sample immediately, from fears it could further decompose, and update the vast — 150-person-strong — DNA database pool they are compiling on-site, Touron said. Jewelry and dental information are also key to the identification process, he said.

Touron noted the bodies would be returned to the families as soon as possible, but warned the process would be long.

Just few kilometers (miles) away, ski stations are still full. The ground is bare where the A320 shattered, but “the pieces of wreckage are so small and shiny they appear like patches of snow on the mountainside,” said Pierre-Henry Brandet, the Interior Ministry spokesman, after first flying over the debris field.

Traveling by foot on the hiking paths that wind through the Alps, it’s possible to reach the site in about an hour. Police all-terrain vehicles have barred the way since the Tuesday crash, guarding against the curious and macabre.

Each load must be carried away by helicopter, and the operation halts at sundown and with the onset of rain or wind. It is likely to last weeks.

Evidence goes into the plastic bags, sealed with a drawstring for speed. Remains go into body bags which are hooked carefully onto the winch, sometimes alongside a helmeted recovery worker, arms spread wide as if in benediction, and everything goes soaring off to Seyne-les-Alpes. Just a few minutes in the air instead of hours overland.

French investigators have not outlined what will happen with the recovered plane pieces, though the focus of the investigation is no longer on technical issues with the plane now that prosecutors say the co-pilot deliberately crashed the plane.

In investigations conducted by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, all pieces of wreckage and other evidence are removed from the crash site and taken to a secure location, usually an aircraft hangar, where they remain during the course of the investigation. When the investigation is over, they are returned to the owner of the plane — usually that is either the airline or an insurance company.

Some personal effects that are clearly identifiable as belonging to an individual — a watch inscribed with a name, for example — are washed and returned to family members. Other personal effects — luggage, coats, shoes, etc. — are photographed and the photos placed in a catalog that family members can look through to identify the belongings of their family members.

The plane’s first black box, containing the cockpit recordings, was recovered within hours of the crash. Pulled from the battered orange casing, the audio files revealed almost unimaginable horror — the plane’s co-pilot locked his commander out of the cockpit and set the aircraft on a descent straight into the mountain, said Marseille prosecutor Brice Robin.

Somewhere on the mountain is the plane’s second black box, ripped from a casing designed to withstand an acceleration of 3,400 times the force of gravity or speeds up to about 310 mph (500 kph). It contains nearly 25 hours’ worth of information on the position and condition of almost every major part in a plane. Recovery crews know this — and the recovery of the bodies — is their priority.

“At this very moment, men are on site to keep looking, keep looking more,” French President Francois Hollande said on Wednesday. “They will continue until they get it.”

Read next: German Co-Pilot Visited Alps Near Crash Site as a Child

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Nigeria

Nigeria Voting Extended Amid Technical Problems and Violence

Voting in some spots was disrupted by violence

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — Nigeria has extended voting to Sunday after problems occurred as millions turned out Saturday to vote in a presidential election that analysts say is too close to call between President Goodluck Jonathan and former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari.

The polling will continue Sunday in some areas where new machines were not reading voters’ biometric cards, said Kayode Idowu, spokesman of the Independent National Electoral Commission. The areas where voting will be extended include Lagos, Nigeria’s largest city on the Atlantic coast.

In other areas, vote counting has already begun, he said.

Nearly 60 million people have cards to vote and determine the outcome of the first election in Nigeria’s history where an opposition candidate has a realistic chance of defeating a sitting president. The vote takes place amid an Islamic insurgency in Nigeria’s northeast in which thousands have been killed.

Boko Haram extremists waving guns forced voters to abandon polling stations in three villages of northeastern Gombe state, witnesses said. The militants have vowed to disrupt elections, calling democracy a corrupt Western concept.

Two car bombs exploded at two polling stations in southeast Enugu state but did not hurt voters, police said. Police detonated two other car bombs at the scene of the first explosion, a polling station set up at a primary school, said Enugu state police Commissioner Dan Bature. Boko Haram has been blamed for many car bombings but was not immediately suspected in the southeastern blasts far from its northeast stronghold.

President Goodluck Jonathan denied the attacks, saying the state governor told him there were no blasts.

The oil-rich and heavily populated south is deeply contested and has become a political battleground since the main opposition parties united in a coalition two years ago, causing dozens of defections from Jonathan’s party.

The official website of the Independent National Electoral Commission was hacked but was quickly secured, said officials who said the site holds no sensitive material.

Thousands of people forced from their homes by the Islamic uprising lined up to vote at a refugee camp in Yola, capital of northeast Adamawa state, which is hosting as many refugees as its 300,000 residents.

Registration to vote began late in most places, delaying the scheduled start of voting in the afternoon. Men and women formed separate lines at many polling stations.

Earlier, officials rushed across the country delivering ballot materials by trucks, speedboats, motorcycles, mules and even camels, in the case of a northern mountaintop village.

Good humor turned to anger and altercations as people waited hours and temperatures rose up to 100 degrees (37 degrees Celsius) to be registered to vote, only to find that machines were not reading new biometric voting cards.

Even the president was affected. Three newly imported card readers failed to recognize the fingerprints of Jonathan and his wife. He returned two hours later and was accredited without the machine using visual identification. Biometric cards and readers are being used for the first time to discourage the kind of fraud that has marred previous votes.

Afterward, Jonathan wiped sweat from his brow and urged people to be patient as he had, telling Channels TV: “I appeal to all Nigerians to be patient no matter the pains it takes as long as if, as a nation, we can conduct free and fair elections that the whole world will accept.”

Jonathan cast his ballot later in the day.

Social media was abuzz with the problem. One tweeter said they solved their issue by having an official remove the protective plastic film from the screen to read a fingerprint on the card reader.

Voting began promptly in a Christian neighborhood of northern Kaduna city though voters’ privacy was not respected. An AP reporter watched as people milled around a booth where a voter is supposed to be alone. Then, voters handed unsealed ballots to an official who put the papers into the ballot box. Voters are supposed to put their own ballots into the box.

Jonathan and Buhari are front-runners among 14 candidates in the high-stakes contest to govern Africa’s most populous and richest nation. In addition to the Islamic uprising, Nigeria is beset by militants demanding a better share of oil revenues who attack petroleum installations in the south and deadly land disputes across the middle of the country between semi-nomadic Muslim cattle herders and mainly Christian farmers.

“We need many changes in Nigeria,” government worker Lawal Dahiru said in Buhari’s home town of Daura. “We have security problems, no job opportunities, we need infrastructure like roads, electricity, water supply, and to mechanize our agriculture.”

This is only the eighth election since Nigeria’s independence from Britain in 1960. In a country steeped in a history of military coups and bloodshed caused by politics, ethnicity, land disputes, oil theft and, lately, the Boko Haram Islamic uprising, the election is important as Africa’s richest nation consolidates its democracy.

Nervous foreign investors are watching as Nigeria is Africa’s largest destination for direct foreign investment though its oil-dependent economy is hurting from slashed petroleum prices.

Nigeria’s military announced Friday it had destroyed the headquarters of Boko Haram’s so-called Islamic caliphate and driven the insurgents from all major areas in northeast Nigeria. There was no way to verify the claim, which seems unlikely. Critics of Jonathan have said recent military victories after months of ceding territory to the Islamic extremists are a ploy to win votes — a charge the presidential campaign denies.

The failure of Jonathan’s administration to curb the insurgency, which killed about 10,000 people last year, has angered Nigerians in the north.

International outrage has grown over another failure — the rescue of 219 schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram nearly a year ago. The extremists have abducted hundreds more since then, using them as sex slaves and fighters.

The Islamic uprising has exacerbated relations between Christians like Jonathan, who dominate the oil-rich south, and Muslims like Buhari who are the majority in the agricultural and cattle-herding lands of the north. The population of 170 million is almost evenly divided between Christians and Muslims.

Some 1,000 people were killed in rioting after Buhari lost to Jonathan in the 2011 elections. Thousands of Nigerians and foreign workers have left the country amid fears of post-election violence.

In 2011, there was no doubt that Jonathan had swept the polls by millions of votes.

Now the race is much closer. The game-changer that transformed Nigeria’s political landscape came two years ago when the main opposition parties formed a coalition and for the first time united behind one candidate, Buhari.

TIME movies

Watch James Bond Return in the First Spectre Trailer

007 faces a formidable set of villains in the new movie

The long-awaited first teaser trailer for the next James Bond film, Spectre, premiered Friday night.

SPECTRE, fans will recall, is the evil organization behind attempts at world domination in classic Bond films like Thunderball and You Only Live Twice (That name? It’s an acronym: Special Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion). The new film will presumably reveal some of SPECTRE’s origins as Bond encounters it for the first time.

Ralph Fiennes takes over as the new M in the new movie, set for release Nov. 6, as Bond hunts down a cryptic message from his past to discover the shadowy organization.

Sam Mendes, who helmed Skyfall, will direct the film starring Daniel Craig as Bond, Christoph Waltz as Oberhauser, Ralph Fiennes as M, Naomie Harris as Moneypenny and Andrew Scott as Denbigh.

Read Next: Here’s Why the Next James Bond Film Is Called Spectre

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME viral

This Black-and-White Footage of the Teletubbies Looks Like a Horror Film

Warning: You may never see the Teletubbies the same way after watching this clip set to the rock band Joy Division

Who knew that the Teletubbies in black and white would look like a shot from an Ingmar Bergman-directed horror film?

A grainy black-and-white image of the Teletubbies, those lovable, huggable children’s television characters, has been circulating the Internet for a few days. While many Twitter users have noted that the image of the huggable furries devoid of their technicolor hue is strangely haunting, verging on horrifying, others commented that the photo looked like a still from the Anton Corbijn-directed music video for “Atmosphere” by post-punkers, Joy Division.

YouTube user Christopher Brown latched on to that idea and ran with it. He took footage of the fuzzy little tubbies, stripped out the color, and soon enough Tinky-Winky, Dipsy, Laa Laa and Po were frolicking through a bleak post-apocalyptic wasteland. Add in the downbeat Joy Division soundtrack, and the result is a wildly weird, strangely avant-garde, creepy video that feels equal part Bergman, David Lynch, and Disney cosplay. Clearly it’s a must-see.

If Joy Division isn’t your cup of tea, someone also made an Aphex Twin version.

(h/t Vanyaland)

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