TIME Internet

Taylor Swift-Loving, Lip-Syncing Cop Returns With Dash Cam Duet

It's a follow-up to his "Shake It Off" dance-along

Officer Jeff Davis and his dash cam are back – and this time they have company.

The Dover, Delaware, policeman, who became Internet famous for his carefree dance-along to Taylor Swift‘s “Shake It Off,” has created a new musical video.

In the clip, Davis is joined in his cop car by Corporal Demetrius Stevenson. The uniformed duo spend a few seconds scanning the radio together before starting their act.

Stevenson lands on MAGIC!’s “Rude” first, initiating a domino effect of hits that each of the police officers masterfully sing and boogie along with. From “Turn Down for What” to “Cruise,” the shoulder-popping pair cover plenty of popular music genres during their five-minute drive.

Davis’ first “performance” ended up on the Web as part of the Dover Police Department’s Dash Cam Confessionals series. With the second video’s view count climbing, it looks like it might be time for Dover to launch its own Lip Sync Battle.

This article originally appeared on People.com.

TIME movies

This Video Puts All the Studio Ghibli Easter Eggs in One Incredible Supercut

Including Easter eggs from My Neighbor Totoro and Howl's Moving Castle

Hayao Miyazaki is a master animator, but he’s also a master of guerrilla marketing. A new video from YouTube channel Movie Munchies shows how Miyazaki subtly snuck the name of his animation studio, Studio Ghibli, into his films, including on a bus billboard in Kiki’s Delivery Service and multiple times into Porco Rosso.

Miyazaki also planted little reminders — or Easter eggs — of his past work into his films, which until now, were only there for eagle-eyed fans and repeat viewers. Examples of Miyazaki playing homage to his past work include a Jiji the Cat pillow in a bedroom in Spirited Away, a Castle in the Sky character walking down the street in Howl’s Moving Castle and a Totoro book on the shelf in the library in Whispers of the Heart. He even managed to take a page out of Alfred Hitchcock’s and Stan Lee’s books and inject a little caricature of himself into the films.

TIME facebook

You Can Make Video Calls in Facebook’s Mobile App Now

Facebook Messenger is taking on FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangout

Facebook is adding video calling to its Messenger app starting Monday, allowing users to chat with their friends via a button in the app.

The feature, which already exists on desktop, allows video chats over both LTE and Wi-Fi and will compete with Google Hangouts, Microsoft’s Skype, and Apple’s FaceTime.

Messenger has more than 600 million monthly active users who are making 10% of all internet-based phone calls and video calling should help it build momentum.

According to Messenger’s head of product, Stan Chudnovsky, developers aimed to make video work well even on low-bandwidth cell networks.

MONEY financial literacy

What You Need to Know Before You Start Investing

Shannon Schuyler of PwC wants you to know this before you start investing your money.

MONEY Saving

Why Technology Makes It Hard to Save Money

Times have changed, and you don't have to actually talk to a teller to withdraw money. Shannon Schuyler of PwC thinks that's dangerous.

TIME Nepal

U.S. Sends Personnel, Funds to Aid in Nepal Relief Effort

About 70 USAID workers and humanitarian personnel are expected to arrive on Monday

The U.S. government is sending troops and aid to Nepal as the nation struggles to recover from a massive earthquake that killed thousands.

As the days go by and death tolls tick up, the need is only expected to grow. As of Monday, officials say 4,000 were killed in the 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck near the capital of Kathmandu on Saturday. The Nepalese government has declared a state of emergency and the international community has joined in the response effort.

A spokesperson for the Nepalese army told the Associated Press that 90 percent of its 100,000 troops are involved in search-and-rescue efforts and assisting the more than 7,000 people injured in the quakes. “We don’t have the helicopters that we need or the expertise to rescue the people trapped,” said Lila Mani Poudyal, the Nepalese government’s Chief Secretary, who noted a demand for “tents, dry goods, blankets, mattresses and 80 different medicines.”

Secretary of State John Kerry issued a statement of condolences Saturday and announced that the U.S. would be joining in the effort to help Nepal recover.

“To the people in Nepal and the region affected by this tragedy we send our heartfelt sympathies. The United States stands with you during this difficult time,” Kerry’s statement reads.

About 70 American personnel and 45 square tons of supplies are expected to reach Nepal on Monday, according to the Department of Defense. The bulk of those traveling to the country are members of the U.S. Agency for International Development Disaster Assistance Response Team including humanitarians and rescue workers from Fairfax County.

Secretary of State John Kerry also announced Monday the U.S. government is sending an additional $9 million to aid in the relief effort, bringing the total funds sent thus far to $10 million.

“The images that everybody has seen are gut-wrenching. Extraordinary devastation, young children carried away in ambulances, whole villages reduced to rubble,” Kerry said Monday during a joint-press conference with his Japanese counterparts. “We are working very closely with the government of Nepal to provide assistance and support.”

Read next: See the Most Dramatic Rescue From the Nepal Earthquake

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TIME Video Games

Everything You Need to Know About Call of Duty: Black Ops III

The next massive Call of Duty game comes out in November

Will Black Ops III be the best Call of Duty yet? Will it bring female characters to warfare in a way that doesn’t feel trite? Or meaningfully differentiate itself from prior installments, gameplay-wise? What about finally escaping the scourge of witheringly negative Metacritic user reviews? Will it be fun? There are lots of questions bracketing a space filled mostly with hypotheticals (and truckloads of publicity hype). Here’s what we know so far, fresh off Activision’s worldwide reveal.

It’s coming November 6

The first/second week of November’s been a Call of Duty mainstay since Call of Duty 3 nudged the series out of late October, when it launched on November 7, 2006.

It’s no longer a single-person campaign experience

Prior Call of Duty installments swapped out characters across their campaigns, but Black Ops III will be the first in series to emphasize multiple protagonists simultaneously experiencing the game’s story-driven modes.

Meaning up to four people can play for the same team, online or local

That’s “four-player cooperative” in gamer lingo, and it means up to four players can play the game together, on the same side, from start to finish, either online or locally with a split screen.

It’s headed even further into the future

The Call of Duty series went science fiction back in 2012 with Black Ops II‘s cyber-jargon-laced near future jaunt to 2025. Last year’s Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare bumped the year out to 2054, and now Black Ops III looks to tour a grim-sounding cyborg-ish version of the 2060s, where “bio-technology coupled with cybernetic enhancements has given rise to a new breed of Black Ops soldier.”

Think soldiers with robotic limbs, in other words.

Yes, that makes it another triple-A game with an elevator pitch plot that lags at least half a century behind the best books, movies and TV shows, but who knows—maybe developer Treyarch will surprise us with its take on the “man vs. machine” trope.

You’re neurally connected to your squadmates

Activision calls it a “Direct Neural Interface,” and says you’ll play as black ops soldiers “that are interconnected, faster, and more lethal than ever.” With any luck, that’ll translate to something more novel than Ventrillo plus d-pad communication shortcuts.

Women will be just as common on the frontlines as men

Gender equality on the battlefield sounds like as huge step in the right direction, though it may court controversy if (and I stress if, since we don’t know yet) Treyarch’s rationale for doing so involves cybernetics-as-prerequisite.

There’s a new movement system that sounds vaguely Assassin’s Creed-ish

Activision describes it as a “momentum-based, chained movement system that allows players to move fluidly through environments and maintain constant control of their weapon.”

Call of Duty parkour?

You can customize up to nine soldiers

It’s called the “Specialist” system, and it’ll let you tweak their physiques, personalities, backstories, weapons and abilities.

There’ll be a Zombies mode

A signature Treyarch component, Activision says it’ll have its own story and experience point progression system.

It’s for PC and new-gen systems only

No surprises here: make that PlayStation 4 and Xbox One consoles, and you’ll presumably need a PC with a high-end GPU if you’re rocking a desktop or laptop.

Update: Activision contacted us to note that while the game has been announced for PC, PS4 and Xbox One at this point, the company hasn’t formally ruled out other platforms.

It spent three years in the cooker

Activision CEO Eric Hirschberg says this is developer Treyarch’s first thee-year project. Longer development times don’t always yield great games, but it’s a promising metric.

Treyarch’s saying it’ll be the best Call of Duty game yet made

To be fair, they always do.

TIME Nepal

China Rushes Aid to Nepal After Deadly Earthquake; Taiwan Is Turned Away

Even with survivors still being pulled from the rubble, geopolitical ramifications loom large

China this weekend rushed a 62-person team to Nepal to help with the ongoing search rescue operation after Saturday’s 7.9-magnitude earthquake. They landed in Kathmandu early Sunday and set to work immediately, according to Chinese state media. The rescuers and a second group from the People’s Liberation Army are both well-equipped to help in the desperate search for survivors of a disaster that has already claimed more than 3,600 lives: Some are veterans of the devastating 2008 Sichuan earthquake, which had a 70,000 death toll, and they bring much-needed supplies.

Not making the trip just yet: a team from Taiwan. Though dozens of Taiwanese were still missing in Nepal, and Taiwan has strong capabilities in disaster recovery and relief, the island was not asked to participate, Vice Foreign Minister Andrew Kao said Monday. (Taiwan NGOs and religious groups do plan to go and Taiwan people have already raised a large sum of money to support the recovery effort.)

It’s still uncertain whether Taiwan’s exclusion is an oversight or a (very poorly timed) slight. But it is clear that a mere two days after the quake, as Nepalis dig barehanded for their loved ones, and families sleep outside in the pouring rain, geopolitical questions loom large. Chief among them is how China’s involvement in the recovery effort could further change the balance of power in the region, challenging India and potentially putting Nepal’s Tibetan exile community at risk.

Tiny, landlocked Nepal is a foreign policy priority for China. Located at the edge of Tibet, the nation of 30 million is a buffer state between regional superpowers China and India. Though India has long seen Nepal as part of its sphere of influence, China has in recent years stepped up efforts to increase its role across Central and South Asia, an effort President Xi Jinping calls the “One Road, One Belt” initiative. (The China-India proxy fight is also playing out in Sri Lanka, as TIME’s Nikhil Kumar recently wrote.)

The “One Road” portion of the project will bolster China’s existing investment in infrastructure and trade. With better road links between Tibet Autonomous Region and Nepal, Beijing will be better placed to access markets in South Asia. China is now the largest player in terms of Foreign Direct Investment in Nepal, overtaking the previous claimant, India. All this, along with China’s massive investment in Pakistan, no doubt has New Delhi nervous.

Another sticking point: exiled Tibetans. Since the Dalai Lama fled to India in 1959, Nepal has traditionally been both a way-station and a refuge for Tibetans fleeing Chinese rule. But as China’s influence has grown, Nepal’s hospitality has waned. A U.S. embassy cable released by WikiLeaks in 2010 noted that “Beijing has asked Kathmandu to step up patrols,” and was providing “financial incentives” to those who apprehended would-be exiles.

Indeed, multiple reports suggest things are getting tougher for the estimated 20,000-strong exile community in Nepal. In April 2014, Human Rights Watch issued a 100-page report, Under China’s Shadow, documenting what they called, “a de facto ban on political protests, sharp restrictions on public activities promoting Tibetan culture and religion, and routine abuses by Nepali security forces.” (In a statement, Nepal’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs denounced the findings as “unnecessary meddling into the friendly relationships between the two close neighbors,” but did not rebut specific claims.)

If neighborly sentiment means more aid for those still waiting in the ruble, few will complain. But Nepal has reason to wonder if this assistance will also bring a push for greater control.

Read next: Where Will the Next Big Earthquake Hit?

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TIME Last Week Tonight

Watch John Oliver Use Free Lunch to Remind Fashion CEOs That Sweatshops Are Bad

Extremely cheap meat, anyone?

On Last Week Tonight, John Oliver turned his gimlet eye on fashion (a.k.a. fun you can buy).

Americans buy roughly 64 items of clothing per person per year, according to Oliver. That fashion habit comes thanks to the low prices available at fast-fashion retailers like H&M, Zara and Forever 21 — nationwide outfitters that, according to Oliver, allow “Midwestern tweens to dress like fortysomething alcoholics attending the funeral of a Tel Aviv nightclub owner.”

But there’s another dark side to cheap clothing, according to Oliver. When H&M sells a dress for $4.95 — which Oliver notes was 7¢ more expensive than a DVD of Ghosts of Girlfriends Past — and yet the CEOs of H&M and Zara are some of the richest men in the world, it’s clear something is awry. On Last Week Tonight, Oliver took fast-fashion companies, including Walmart and Gap, to task for the fact that sweatshops and child labor are still commonly used to manufacture high-street clothing.

Then, for a lesson in manufacturing oversight, Oliver kindly sent extremely cheap lunches of indeterminate origin to the CEOs of fashion companies that employ cheap labor.

Read next: John Oliver: ‘Thank F–k There Weren’t Camera Phones’ When I Started Out

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