TIME Television

George Clooney Takes Over Downton Abbey for Charity

For the TV fundraiser Text Santa

He’s already Hollywood royalty, but now George Clooney has become an Earl – in the world of Downton Abbey, anyway.

Clooney assumed his long-awaited and temporary role in the British aristocracy in a special 9-minute episode of the show for the TV fundraiser Text Santa.

In the hilarious tongue-in-cheek video above, Lord Grantham – with the help of Ab Fab’s Patsy Stone! – sees what life would be like at the Abbey if he were replaced by a certain George Oceans Gravity, Marquis of Hollywood – otherwise known as Lord Hollywood.

And we’ll just say Downton has been turned upside down by Clooney’s charms. In fact, Lord Hollywood had such an effect on Dame Maggie Smith’s character, the Dowager Countess, that when he kissed her hand she fell off her perch and collapsed on the floor.

“That man has got the entire household behaving like fools!” Lord Grantham says, after seeing how his loved ones behave without his influence. “Downton has gone to rack and ruin without me.”

Luckily, the whole thing was just a bad dream.

Text Santa is a charity fundraiser that helps support a string of U.K.-based cancer and children’s charities. Click here to donate.

Watch the full episode, in two parts, here.

This article originally appeared at PEOPLE.com

TIME Television

Watch Orange is the New Black Cast Send Holiday Greetings From Prison

"On my first day at Litchfield my bunkmate gave to me..."

The cast of the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black wished their fans a merry Christmas on Thursday by releasing a video from the set of Litchfield prison, in which they sing a slightly more explicit version of the holiday classic, “The Twelve Days of Christmas.”

TIME

Craig Ferguson Gets An All-Star ‘Late Late Show’ Send-Off

Craig Ferguson of CBS’s The Late Late Show signed off Friday night with a star-filled music video, along with guests Jay Leno and Bob Newhart.

“Maybe art is a very grand word but… what I was trying to do here and what I think we have managed to do here is make something that wasn’t here before,” Ferguson told his audience.

Ferguson has hosted The Late Late Show since 2005, when he took over from Craig Kilborn. British actor and comedian James Corden will take over for Ferguson in early 2015.

READ MORE: Stephen Colbert, David Letterman and the History of Late-Night Torch Passing

TIME movies

Watch Kevin Hart Teach Will Ferrell How to Survive Prison in the New Get Hard Trailer

"Prison school is in session."

A business tycoon played by Will Ferrell assumes Kevin Hart’s character can teach him how survive behind bars after he is sentenced to 10 years in prison for fraud and embezzlement in Get Hard.

The film is slated for release in March.

TIME Media

Sony Chief Says ‘We Have Not Caved’ on The Interview

"We have not given up," Michael Lynton said after his studio cancelled the movie under pressure

Sony Pictures Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton defended his company’s decision to cancel the release of The Interview on Friday, even as the company refused to rule out releasing the movie in other ways.

Lynton said Sony’s decision was prompted by movie theaters opting not to show the film after hackers, who U.S. officials believe are linked to North Korea and who have wreaked havoc on the studio by disclosing emails and other company information, threatened 9/11-style attacks. Moments earlier, President Barack Obama had called the move to cancel the Christmas Day release a “mistake.”

“The unfortunate part is in this instance the President, the press, and the public are mistaken as to what actually happened,” Lynton said on CNN. “When it came to the crucial moment… the movie theaters came to us one by one over the course of a very short period of time. We were completely surprised by it.”

Read more: You can’t see The Interview, but TIME’s film critic did

Sony said in a statement later Friday that its decision was only about the Christmas Day release.

“After that decision, we immediately began actively surveying alternatives to enable us to release the movie on a different platform,” the studio said. “It is still our hope that anyone who wants to see this movie will get the opportunity to do so.”

Obama told reporters he wished Sony had reached out to him before canceling the film’s Christmas day release. It depicts a fictional assassination attempt against North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

“We cannot have a society where some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship here in the United States,” he said. “Imagine if producers and distributors and others start engaging in self-censorship because they don’t want to offend the sensibilities of someone who’s sensibilities probably need to be offended.”

Lynton denied the studio had given into the hackers’ threats.

“We have not caved. We have not given up,” he said. “We have always had every desire to have the American public see this movie.”

Read next: Obama Says Sony “Made a Mistake” Pulling ‘The Interview’

TIME movies

See 13 Times World Leaders Were Depicted in Movies

The cancelled release of The Interview, the movie that sparked a devastating cyberattack on Sony Pictures, shows how controversial depicting the assassination of a current world leader can be. Sure, Inglourious Basterds imagined the assassination of Hitler, but this was, of course, several decades after Hitler’s actual death.

It’s also pretty rare for films to have depictions of current or still-living heads of state at all (at the time the movie is made), even without the assassination plots. From Queen Elizabeth II to Ayatollah Khomeini, here are a few examples of world leaders being shown in movies.

TIME White House

Obama Looks to the ‘4th Quarter’ of His Presidency

“Interesting things happen in the fourth quarter,” Obama said

At the end of a grim year that saw his approval ratings sink, his party pummeled in elections and his legislative agenda stymied by opponents, President Barack Obama made an impassioned argument Friday that the nation has emerged stronger than ever from economic upheaval and an unending sequence of foreign crises.

It was a rare glimpse of vintage Obama, the upbeat change-agent from his campaign days, who has all but vanished after six tough years of turmoil. In his ceremonial year-end news conference, Obama was buoyant, bantering with the press corps, mocking North Korean leader Kim Jong Un for the rogue nation’s response to a Seth Rogen movie, and rattling off statistics about the positive steps his administration has taken. And he served notice that as he approaches the final lap of his presidency, he isn’t finished putting his stamp on the nation.

“Interesting things happen in the fourth quarter,” the sports-loving president said with a grin.

Read more: Obama says Sony ‘made a mistake’ in pulling The Interview

Obama’s remarks came after a six-week stretch in which he sidestepped Congress to issue a series of major executive actions and foreign policy pronouncements, including a unilateral overhaul of U.S. immigration law in November and this week’s announcement that the U.S. will begin to normalize relations with Cuba after a half-century of conflict.

“This is still a repressive regime,” Obama said of the Cuban leaders, “but I know deep in my bones that if you’ve done the same thing for 50 years and nothing has changed, you should try something different.” Recounting his historic phone conversation this week with Cuban President Raul Castro, Obama joked that he apologized to Castro for his windy preamble, only to have his Cuban counterpart go on for twice as long.

Obama acknowledged that dismantling the Cuba trade embargo would require the cooperation of Congress, both chambers of which will be controlled by Republicans come January. “I think there are real opportunities to get things done in Congress,” he said. “The question is going to be are we able to separate out those areas where we disagree and those areas where we agree.”

One key area of disagreement is the Keystone XL pipeline, which Republicans are set to move forward with early next year. Asked Friday whether he would approve the project, which has been touted by Republicans as a job-creator and strongly opposed by environmental groups, Obama sounded less inclined than ever. “It’s not even going to be a nominal benefit to U.S. consumers,” the President said.

But Obama made a case that in a year dotted with setbacks and marked by ongoing Congressional dysfunction, the U.S. government had largely succeeded in rising to the challenge. Ebola has been wiped from U.S. shores and is receding in much of West Africa. The tide of unaccompanied minors arriving on the southern border has swept back out. The U.S. campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) saw the first signs of success. The economy is steadily improving, even if many have yet to feel the benefits of a brightening job market.

“I guess that’s my general theme for the end of the year. We’ve gone through difficult times,” Obama said. “But through persistent effort and faith in the American people, things get better.”

“Part of what I hope, as we reflect on the new year, this should generate is some confidence,” Obama said. “America knows how to solve problems. And when we work together, we can’t be stopped.

“And now I’m going to go on vacation,” the President added, eyeing an exit for his annual trip to Hawaii. “Mele Kalikimaka, everybody. Mahalo.”

TIME White House

Obama Says Sony ‘Made a Mistake’ Pulling The Interview

"That’s not who we are," Obama said

President Barack Obama said Friday that Sony “made a mistake” in pulling its film The Interview from distribution following a cyberattack that American officials have linked to North Korea.

Speaking to reporters at the White House, Obama confirmed the FBI’s assessment that North Korea was behind the attack. He said he wished the studio had reached out to him before canceling the film’s release, and that he fears it sets a bad precedent for the nation.

“We cannot have a society where some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship here in the United States,” Obama said. “Imagine if producers and distributors and others start engaging in self-censorship because they don’t want to offend the sensibilities of someone who’s sensibilities probably need to be offended.”

“That’s not who we are,” Obama added, noting that the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing did not deter runners from running this year. “That’s not what America’s about.”

Sony Pictures Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton, appearing on CNN shortly after Obama spoke, defended the studio. “We have not caved,” he said. “We have not given up. We have persevered and we have not backed down. We have always had every desire to have the American public see this movie.”

Obama promised that the United States would respond “proportionally” to the attack, but would not detail those actions publicly.

“We will respond,” he said. We will respond proportionally, and we will respond at a place and time that we choose.”

Read more: The 7 most outrageous things we learned from the Sony hack

TIME animals

This Ad Featuring Pets Eating With Human Hands Is Terrifying

Isn’t it every pet’s dream to be able to eat at the dining room table alongside humans? This ad for pet food company Freshpet replaces the heads of 14 humans sitting around the dining room table with the heads of 13 dogs and one cat. The animals use their human hands to do what many humans do at dinner, play with their iPhones at the table or sneak a sip of booze from a flask underneath the table. The one thing they do not do is talk. Frankly, people watching this spot who have to have dinner with chatty relatives over the holidays might envy that part.

MONEY privacy

Security Flaws Let Hackers Listen in on Calls

German researchers say the network that allows cellphone carriers to direct calls to one another is full of security holes.

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