Definitive Proof the Apple vs. Samsung Case Is Really About Google

Google
Justin Lane—EPA

Apple’s on-going patent lawsuit against Samsung has long been cast as a proxy war against Google, the maker of the Android operating system that powers the Samsung devices competing with the iPhone. New evidence revealed during the Samsung-Apple trial illustrate that Google is in fact a direct player in the conflict.

On Tuesday Apple brought forth a deposition by a Google employee confirming that Google had sent emails to Samsung offering to help pay some of the cell phone manufacturer’s legal costs in the case. Google even offered to help pay for some of the damages if Samsung loses. Google said it would provide financial aid regarding two of the five patents that Apple has brought to trial. Apple is seeking a total of $2.2 billion in damages in the infringement case.

Earlier in the trial, Google employees testified on Samsung’s behalf, saying that Google had independently created some of the technology Apple is litigating over for its own Android platform before the iPhone launched.

The patent trial has led to the airing of much dirty laundry among some of the world’s largest tech giants. Samsung acknowledged that Steve Jobs’ death would provide Apple an “unintended benefit,” for example, and Apple fretted over the effectiveness of Samsung ads mocking the iPhone.

social networks

Twitter’s New Profile Design: 8 Points to Consider

Twitter's new profile design is finally available to everyone, and it's brimming with improvements.

Twitter’s redesigned profile pages were previously available to select users in a staggered rollout that’s been ongoing for weeks, but as of today, they’re available to anyone so inclined to push a button and pull the trigger. The social microblogging network’s new look does indeed, as you’ve perhaps heard, have something of Facebook’s affectations with its newly dominant top-third banner and left-side headshot overlooking a three-column spread, where the central column comprising your tweets occupies about 50% of your browser’s total, width-wise.

Twitter

Twitter’s covered most of this in a blog post, but let’s step through the new features anyway, and I’ll do my best to annotate.

Twitter hasn’t changed — not really

It’s still a giant column of pith, stacked in rectangles (mostly), and filled with all your wit and wisdom. It’s still Twitter, that is, with all its eggs in the same minimalist baskets, and none of Facebook’s busy, multilayered distractions.

..but it’s clearly more Facebook-like.

Whoever said “good artists borrow, great ones steal” had it exactly right. I’m not sure I’d call any of Twitter’s tweaks outright stealing, but there’s definitely some borrowing going on. And you could argue, given Twitter’s relative simplicity (contrasted with Facebook’s clutter), that these design choices work better on Twitter: the 1,500 x 500 pixel banner up top lets you add scenery where before your profile picture looked like a postage stamp clapped on top of a smallish picture box. And that banner only nudges the top menu — where it tallies tweets, who you’re following, your followers and more — down roughly an inch.

In short, Twitter’s profile pages now use browser-space more efficiently, fitting more in without cramping your view.

Isn’t the new font for tweets kinda gargantuan?

I don’t think so. Facebook lets you post over 60,000 characters a shot, where Twitter still limits you to 140 characters per tweet. In the new design, tweets that do more business than others (Twitter refers to this as “engagement”) use a font that’s roughly twice as big as before. That’s contrasted against the left- and right-hand columns, which still use a smaller font.

Twitter wants that central column to pop, not be equal to or subsumed by its surroundings. It’s the company broadening its social networking grammar, cribbing a feature from tag clusters of old, as well as telegraphing what it still views as its most important asset — your tweets — in the mix.

You’ll want a 400 x 400 profile photo.

Under the new design, Twitter’s basically taking the upsized version of your profile picture when clicked and making it the default size against its new topside banner background.

I wasn’t sure what size my existing picture was, so I checked: 256 x 256 pixels. You don’t have to upgrade — your old pic will upscale in the new design — but if you want to look smart (as in sharp, focus-wise), take the time to re-crop and upload that old profile shot at 400 x 400 pixels, or just use the design switch as an opportunity to create a new one.

You’ll want a 1,500 x 500 background header, too.

They’re laid out in a way that’s not distracting — that, and if you don’t upload one, you’re stuck with a bland color and message declaiming “Make this space yours. Add a photo!”

If you don’t have one handy, Twitter’s offering an attractive collection of Flickr images to get you started here.

The menu has more data angles, and they’re important ones.

Ever since Twitter added the option to include inline photos and videos, we’ve been accruing repositories of visual content. Under the old design, these were jammed into a lefthand box that, when clicked, swapped your tweet column for a stacked picture/video column. In the new design, picture/video is just another menu option next to tweets and followers. When clicked, it smartly hijacks both the center and righthand side of your view, giving you two full columns to peruse more content at once — another nod to Facebook’s News Feed aesthetic.

There’s some duplication of effort here: Twitter’s left that standalone photos/videos box over in the lefthand column, but it feels like a reasonable compromise between making the box the only way to access your media and yanking it entirely and preventing visitors from peeping your most recent shots.

You can fine-tune your Twitter-stream.

The old design included both tweets and replies in one unbroken stream under “tweets.” The new design defaults to just your tweets (without replies) and lets you opt to view “tweets and replies,” as well as favorites and followers (who now appear, like photos/videos, in a smart, semi-tiled view that hijacks the middle and righthand columns). That added layer of control granularity lets both you or your visitors scroll through your dispatches much more quickly, if desired.

You can pin your best stuff to promote conversations.

As with all of the prior points, this matters only for people visiting your Twitter page on the web — if they use a client app, it’s irrelevant, and it’s not clear when/if we’ll see versions that avail themselves of these tweaks — but you can now pin your “best” tweets to the top of your feed, like threads on a message board, allowing you to flag your favorite thoughts or conversations for passersby.

It’s probably a bigger deal if you’re using Twitter as a business and want to highlight a press release or promotion (or a news site looking to highlight a story), but regardless, it’s nice to see Twitter adding features that add more options to the conversation without bogging down feeds or noticeably interrupting their flow.

Creepy New Website Shows Just How Much Facebook Knows About You

Images of WhatsApp As Facebook Inc. Makes Acquisition For $19 Billion
Getty Images

How much can someone learn about you by accessing your Facebook data? Not just your friends and interests, but also who stalks you, where you spend your time and even how much money you make.

That’s the set-up for a new website called Digital Shadow promoting the upcoming spy video game Watch Dogs by Ubisoft. Give the site authorization to scrape your Facebook profile for data, and it will list your “pawns” (your closest friends that can be used against you), “obsessions” (the people you Facebook creep on the most), and “scapegoats” (people you don’t interact with and would willingly sacrifice if necessary). The sleek dossier also includes photos of places you hang out, data on when you post most often, and a series of guesses at your password based on the things you write about most often.

Of course, all this “creepy” insight is based on information you willingly gave to Facebook at some time or another. Letting Watch Dogs scour your profile can act as a sobering reminder that the information you put on the Internet can potentially be used against you.

Gadgets

This Smartphone Is Apparently Soft as a Baby’s Bottom

OnePlus

The OnePlus One has a rear coating made of powdered cashew nuts, plus impressive specs at $300.

There are a lot of interesting things about the OnePlus One smartphone, from its sleek design to its use of high-end tech specs at mid-range prices.

But no detail stands out quite like this one, from Engadget:

What’s more, OnePlus took one step further and applied corresponding textures onto the back of the “silk white” and “sandstone black” versions. The white one is our favorite, as its special coating — apparently made out of powdered cashew nuts — gives a “baby skin” feel, which is most noticeable when you gently stroke it with your cheek.

I don’t know what’s weirder: that you can emulate the feel of baby skin with powered cashews, or that there’s now a smartphone you can snuggle up to in lieu of human contact. (I’d probably just swap in one of the optional wooden covers instead.)

Underneath the skin-like coating, the OnePlus One packs a 2.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 processor, 3 GB of RAM, a 3,100 mAh battery, a 13-megapixel rear camera (with f/2.0 aperture) and a 5-megapixel wide-angle front camera. The 1080p display measures 5.5 inches, and Android 4.4 is on board with CyanogenMod, which maintains the stock Android feel but adds some more customization options.

OnePlus says it’ll sell a 16 GB version for $300 and a 64 GB version for $349 starting next quarter–those are off-contract, subsidy-free prices, mind you–but the exact launch details are a bit shaky. The phone will first be available to 100 people through an invite program, and those users can in turn invite other people. There’s no word on when the baby skin smartphone experience will open up to everyone.

Security

9 Terrifying Digital Threats Lurking in the Shadows

Getty

fortunelogo-blue
This post is in partnership with Fortune, which offers the latest business and finance news. Read the article below originally published at Fortune.com.

It’s that time of year again: Spring is in the air, Monarch butterflies are traveling north, and Verizon’s data breach report is making the rounds, freaking out already freaked-out chief information security officers around the globe.

The annual report compiles and analyzes more than 63,000 security incidents (as well as 1,300 confirmed data breaches) from about 50 companies worldwide. This year’s 60-page document identified nine main patterns of attack, including point-of-sale intrusions, denial-of-service attacks and acts of cyberespionage. According to Verizon, 94% of all security incidents in 2013 can be traced to these nine basic categories.

(As for the other 6% of threats facing corporate America, well, ignorance is bliss, right?)

Here, our summary of the most pressing security threats for major companies:

1. Web app attacks

Hands down, this is the most common type of data breach. According to Verizon’s report, web applications remain the “proverbial punching bag of the Internet.” How do the bad guys do it? Phishing techniques, installing malware, and, yes, correctly guessing the name of your first stuffed animal, your oldest cousin’s eye color and your nickname in sixth grade. There are ways to better protect Internet-facing applications, Verizon insists, and it starts with two-factor authentication.

2. Cyberespionage

Incidents of unauthorized network or system access linked to state-affiliated actors have tripled — that’s right, tripled — over the last year. Espionage exhibits a wider variety of “threat actions” than any other attack pattern, Verizon says, which means that once intruders gain access, they’re making themselves comfortable and partaking in all sorts of activities, from scanning networks to exporting data. Verizon warns that we can’t keep blaming China, though — at least not just China. About 21% of reported incidents are now being instigated from Eastern Europe.

3. Point-of-sale intrusions

Given the recent high-profile Target breach, in which hackers gained access to the credit card numbers of some 40 million customers, this may seem like the attack pattern du jour. But Verizon claims point-of-sale intrusions have actually been trending down over the last several years. “Recent highly publicized breaches of several large retailers have brought POS compromises to the forefront,” the report’s authors write. “But at the risk of getting all security-hipster on you — we’ve been talking about this for years.” Still, retailers and hotel companies in particular need to be concerned about this kind of attack. It only takes one massive point-of-sale intrusion to scare away customers and investors — just ask Target.

4. Payment card skimmers

Skimming mainly affects ATMs and gas pumps, and is a relatively crude form of attack that requires a skimming device to be physically added to a machine. It’s hardly a new tactic, but what’s different today is the way that the data from “skimmed” payment cards is collected. Before, a criminal had to retrieve the skimming device; now, a thief can remotely collect the data using Bluetooth or other wireless technologies. More modern ATMs are designed to be relatively tamper-free, but this is still a big problem in some parts of the world, such as Bulgaria and Armenia.

5. Insider misuse

Not sure what falls under this category? Imagine someone akin to the rebel NSA defense contractor Edward Snowden, or pretty much any unapproved or malicious use of organizational resources. The most common examples of this are employees using forbidden devices (e.g. USB drives) or services to send intellectual property to their personal accounts — or, more deliberately, posing as another user and sending messages aimed at getting a colleague fired. According to Verizon, many of the people committing these crimes are payment chain personnel and end users, but C-suite managers were more to blame in prior years. Bottom line: Trust no one.

6. Crimeware

This category includes any malware incident that doesn’t fit into the espionage or point-of-sale buckets. The goal is always some kind of illicit activity, such as stealing users’ online banking credentials. Most forms of crimeware start with web activity such as downloads or so-called drive-by infections, where a virus can be downloaded when a user unknowingly clicks on a deceptive pop-up window. What can corporations do to combat these types of attacks? Keep software such as browsers up to date.

7. Miscellaneous errors

Oops, I did it again — as in, I sent an email containing sensitive information to the wrong recipient. That’s the most common example of this kind of unintentional data disclosure. Others include accidentally posting non-public information to a company’s web server or even snail-mailing documents to the wrong physical address. There’s no cure for human error (other than replacing them with computers, of course), but Verizon says corporations can implement data loss prevention software to reduce instances of sensitive files sent by email and tighten processes around posting documents to internal and external websites.

8. Physical theft/loss

Here’s a fun fact: It turns out that corporate assets like phones and laptops are stolen from corporate offices more often than from homes or vehicles. The primary cause of this type of incident? Carelessness. According to the Verizon report: “Accidents happen. People lose stuff. People steal stuff. And that’s never going to change.” The only thing you can change, advises the company, is to encrypt devices, back up data, and encourage employees to keep their gadgets close.

9. Distributed denial-of-service attacks

Last but not least, so-called DDoS threats include any attack aimed at compromising the availability of networks and systems. These are primarily directed at the financial, retail and public sectors. And while the motives behind shutting down corporate, consumer-facing websites remains the same — extortion, protest, or perverse fun — the tools at attackers’ disposal have become more sophisticated and more thoughtfully named, such as “Brobot” and “itsoknoproblembro.”

More on cybersecurity from Fortune:

Internet

Instagrammers Post 216,000 New Pics a Minute and Other Crazy Internet Data Facts

There are 26,380 Yelp reviews generated every minute. God help all of us.

Every minute, 2.4 billion people on the internet churn out a lot of data. While data generation might not seem like the most interesting of topics, business intelligence company Domo translated them into digestible tidbits of information.

For example: Instagram users post 216,000 new photos every minute, which dwarfs Pinterest users’ 3,472 pins a minute. Meanwhile, Whatsapp users share 347,222 pictures a minute.

Domo
streaming video

HBO Is Coming to Amazon Prime

HBO

An unprecedented, multi-year licensing deal announced on Wednesday will bring dozens of HBO movies, comedy specials and series, like Boardwalk Empire, to members of Amazon's $99-per-year Prime subscription service, with the first shows due in late May

Amazon and HBO are joining hands for an exclusive licensing deal that will bring HBO’s content to Amazon’s $99-per-year Prime subscription service, with the first shows hitting Prime on May 21.

Assuming you’re a fan of the sort of content HBO offers, including some of the highest-acclaimed series in television history, that’s as big a deal as any in recent memory — the first time in history HBO’s paired off with an online-only subscription-based streamer.

It means access to HBO will no longer be limited to cable or satellite provider packages, opening the door wide for the first time to cord-cutters who’ve doubtless been waiting for a deal like this to go down. It means you’ll be able to tap HBO with anything that currently supports Amazon’s Prime channel — set-tops, tablets, phones, game consoles, etc. — and gain access to whole swathes of HBO content (as well as free two-day shipping and Kindle library lending) for Amazon’s standard $99-per-year fee.

Bear in mind, if you’re not a member, that Prime content is free to Prime members; this isn’t HBO signing up to let Amazon charge you to watch these shows. Amazon says Prime members will have “unlimited streaming access” to shows that include:

  • All seasons of The Sopranos, The Wire, Deadwood, Rome and Six Feet Under, as well as Eastbound & Down, Enlightened and Flight of the Conchords
  • Miniseries, including Angels in America, Band of Brothers, John Adams, The Pacific and Parade’s End
  • Select seasons of current series such as Boardwalk Empire, Treme and True Blood
  • Original movies like Game Change, Too Big To Fail and You Don’t Know Jack
  • Documentaries including the Autopsy and Iceman series, Ghosts of Abu Ghraib and When the Levees Broke
  • Original comedy specials from Lewis Black, Ellen DeGeneres, Louis CK and Bill Maher

Amazon says earlier seasons of HBO shows like Girls, The Newsroom and Veep will roll out over the course of the multi-year agreement, approximately three years after airing on HBO.”

Not to worry, cable subscribers and HBO Go users: Amazon assures HBO content will remain “on all HBO platforms.” HBO hasn’t signed any of its series over to Amazon exclusively, in other words; only the right to stream existing shows through Prime. What’s more, Amazon says the HBO Go app is coming to Amazon’s Fire TV set-top box by the end of the year, the upside being access to the full HBO caboodle if you pay monthly for HBO: “1,700 titles online including every episode of new and classic HBO series, as well as HBO original films, miniseries, sports, documentaries, specials and a wide selection of blockbuster movies.”

technology

Google Street View Now Includes Time Lapse Feature

Google Maps Street View Time Lapse
Google released time lapse functionality within street view, allowing users to look back in time. Google

Seven years of Google Street View images are now available all at once

Since it launched in 2007, Google Street View has become the closest thing we have to a teleportation device. With a few keystrokes, you can go somewhere without actually going there, walking sidewalks in Paris one moment and poking into Mumbai shop windows the next.

But Google’s virtual map of the world has always been limited to the present — or at least the most recent images transmitted by its camera-equipped vehicles. Each time those vehicles captured a site, the new images would become searchable and the old ones were taken down and relegated to Google’s servers.

Now, Street View is trying to turn its teleportation device into a time machine. Starting today, all the Street View images taken over the last seven years will be viewable as part of a new feature that allows users to see how places have changed since Google began photographing the globe’s nooks and crannies. It happens in a whirl. Buildings that took years to construct magically appear in moments. Neighborhoods humming with life one year are wiped away by natural disasters the next. Billboards featuring flip phones suddenly show smartphones.

“Our original goal with Street View was to build a map that is useful, accurate and comprehensive,” says Vinay Shet, a Google product manager. “So we’ve been capturing all these snapshots, and we thought, let’s use all this data and create something that users will love, that will be exploratory, and hopefully will be useful.”

The time lapse feature will appear in a window within Street View, along with a bar users can manually toggle to change years. (It includes a substitute for Pegman, the little yellow guy users drag to launch Street View. On time lapse, your guide is an avatar that looks an awful lot like Dr. Brown from Back to the Future.)

There will also be double the number of Street View images that were previously accessible. Google Trekkers have driven more than 5 million miles in 50 countries since 2007 and have gone many places more than once, giving most locations at least one time-lapsed layer.

Google’s most engaging images often involve construction and destruction. One World Trade Center in New York City and Rio de Janeiro’s World Cup stadium rise in seconds, while areas affected by the Japanese tsunami become instantly obliterated.

“It’s only been seven years,” Shet says, “but it’s amazing how many interesting changes we’ve found.”

One World Trade Center, New York City
April 2009 – August 2013

Google

The construction of One World Trade Center began in 2006, but for the first few years most of the work was below-ground. Much of the above-ground construction took place right as Google began capturing it from Manhattan’s West Street.

Soumaya Museum, Mexico City
October 2010 – November 2011

Google

This Mexico City art museum was financed by Carlos Slim, the world’s richest man. The modern, showpiece structure was constructued in a little over a year.

The Howard Theatre, Washington, DC
July 2009 – May 2012

Google

The historic Howard Theatre, built in 1910, was in danger of closing a century later but underwent a massive $29 million renovation that began September 2010. It reopened in April 2012.

Marina Bay Sands Resort, Singapore
November 2008 – May 2013

Google

The hotel, considered the most expensive building in the world at $5.7 billion, includes three 55-story towers with more than 2,500 rooms. It opened in June 2010.

Graffiti on Bowery Street, New York City
June 2009 – August 2013

Google

The side of a building on Bowery Street in New York’s Lower East Side neighborhood that’s seen a steady rotation of street artists.

Naucalpan, Mexico
November 2008 – October 2013

Google

An overpass gets built over an existing street in Naucalpan, Mexico, just outside of Mexico City.

Brazil World Cup stadium, Fortaleza, Brazil
February 2012 – September 2013

Google

A soccer stadium slowly rises in Fortaleza, Brazil, one of the host cities for the 2014 FIFA World Cup.

 

space

Watch Live: Astronauts Spacewalk at International Space Station

NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson are venturing outside the International Space Station as part of a planned mission to replace equipment that failed during routine testing earlier this month

+ READ ARTICLE

Two NASA astronauts at the International Space Station are venturing outside for a spacewalk Wednesday as part of a planned mission to replace equipment that failed earlier this month.

Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson are replacing a backup multiplexer-demultiplexer (MDM) that failed during routine testing April 11, says NASA. It is one of two MDMs that help control the external cooling system, mobile transporter rail car, and other functions.

The spacewalk, scheduled to begin Wednesday at 9:20 a.m. EDT, is the 179th in support of space station assembly and maintenance, the ninth in Mastracchio’s career and fifth for Swanson.

Mastracchio is wearing the suit with the red stripes, while Swanson is wearing a suit without stripes.

Web

The Best Web Browser

With our lives being so connected these days, most of us spend more time using our web browser than any other computer program. A great browser makes for the best Internet experience, so choosing the right one is a necessity. And right now both PC and Mac owners have a lot of choices. There are the default browsers, Safari and Internet Explorer, plus dozens of others that work on both platforms. What makes any of them better than the others?

The best browsers are simple to use, speedy, hog as few computer resources as possible and keep you safe from malware and third-party tracking. On top of that, browsers should offer a wealth of customization options, tight integration with sites and services you use often, robust tab and window management, and syncing across computers and mobile devices.

There are five browsers that have most or all of these qualities: Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, and Opera. Of these, Chrome and Firefox offer the best experiences across the board and have the advantage of being available for all major operating systems and many mobile devices. After using both browsers extensively for over six months, I found Firefox to be the superior browser. Read on to find out why.

Firefox: The browser to beat

If you’re familiar with Firefox from years past, you might balk at my recommendation at first. Firefox was once a top browser alternative but lost a lot of popularity and users to Chrome because it grew too slow while hogging a ton of memory. It took a while, but Mozilla’s developers finally turned this problem around. It’s secure, fast, easy to use, customizable, uses few computer resources and makes switching between computers and mobile devices easy.

Browser add-ons

firefox-addons-list-600px
Mozilla

Firefox has the most robust and useful library of add-ons for its browser, making it the most customizable and useful browser. It has all of the most popular extensions and plugins—ad blockers, adjuncts to popular services like Evernote and Pocket, social network integration, etc.—plus some very useful add-ons that are only available for Firefox. For instance the Heartbleed checker for Firefox, Heartbleed-Ext, adds a red warning at the top of vulnerable sites.

Plus, all of the add-ons you find in the official Mozilla repository (found under Firefox >> Add-ons) are checked for compatibility and malware, unlike Google Chrome’s extension library. Add-ons don’t update themselves or add new functionality without getting your explicit permission, but the browser automatically checks for updates and security patches and will prompt you to install them.

firefox-tab-groups-400px
To create a Tab Group, you use the Tab Group short cut–”Ctrl + Shift + E” for PCs and “Command + Shift + E” for Macs. Then drag the tab you want to use to create a group out of the main Group Your Tabs box to create a new group. Mozilla

Tab and window management

If you like to keep multiple sites open in multiple windows or tabs, Firefox’s built-in tools for managing them are the best. The Tab Groups feature makes keeping tabs organized much easier and clears away the clutter that comes with having dozens of tabs open in one window. You can group tabs any way you like and even name the groups so you remember which websites you have stored inside. Switching between groups is as easy as switching between windows, but everything stays under one icon. In Firefox you can also “pin” a tab (right click on a tab to pin it), which moves it to the left of other tabs and keeps it in place permanently, even after you restart. This is useful for websites I keep open and check often, such as Gmail and Facebook, because I can always find them and see notifications.

Security

Besides keeping your plug-ins updated, there are other ways Firefox keeps you secure. The browser is automatically updated to ensure you have the freshest protection while surfing. Adobe Flash is now integrated into the browser and automatically updated to new, more secure versions. And, if you come across a malware-infected site or a fake site designed for phishing, the browser will warn you before loading. This list of bad sites is kept up to date as new fakes and infections pop up.

Private browsing

Mozilla improved on Firefox’s private browsing experience. Now it works similarly to Chrome–private windows open alongside normal ones, so you don’t have to close down what you’re doing to go incognito. However, you can’t open multiple sessions in private windows as you can with Internet Explorer. If you’re signed into one Yahoo Mail account in private, you can’t sign into a second account in another private window.

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Mozilla

Syncing across devices

The ability to sync browser data is increasingly important for people who spend their day switching between devices, be they mobile phones, tablets, or computers. It’s nice to be able to reopen tabs from your computer on your phone, especially if the tab has needed information. I also appreciate having all my bookmarks, passwords, and add-ons on both my work and home computer. Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer and Safari all have some syncing capability, though the first two have the best and most comprehensive implementation.

Setting up Chrome’s sync is easier and faster than Firefox because all you have to do is sign in to your Google account and you’re done. Firefox has a code verification system that requires using an existing synced device to authorize another, which is a minor pain.

Syncing works on Android smartphones and tablets, too, since both Chrome and Firefox have mobile versions on that platform. However, there’s no Firefox for iOS. Chrome is available for iPhone and iPad, though Safari is naturally more integrated with those devices and you can’t change the default browser to Chrome in iOS.

Final call

Firefox is now back to being the best browser choice, thanks to recent updates and added features. It’s secure, streamlined, customizable and makes switching between computers and mobile devices easy.

This article was written by K.T. Bradford and originally appeared on Techlicious.

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