MONEY Shopping

New Tool Tells Shoppers Whether the iPhone They’re About to Buy Was Stolen

dusting for fingerprints
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Worried that Craigslist iPhone might have been stolen? Now there's a way to know.

Buying used electronics has always been tricky. On the one hand, the prices are lower and platforms like Craigslist make shopping a breeze. On the other hand, you run the risk of buying a device that doesn’t work perfectly. And then there’s always the chance you could end up buying a stolen a thief — a risk that’s especially acute when purchasing a used iPhone. A full half of robberies in San Francisco were smartphone related, and similar patterns have emerged in other major cities.

Luckily for honest buyers, and anyone who doesn’t want their own iDevice nabbed, Apple has a released a tool to identify whether or not a given iPhone, iPad, or other iOS device is stolen. The website, which does not require a login, asks users to enter the serial number of their prospective purchase, and will then reveal whether the phone in question has an activation lock in place. If it does, that means either that the phone was stolen or the person selling it hasn’t correctly reset their device. Either way, it’s not a phone you want to buy.

Screen Shot 2014-10-02 at 10.20.41 AM
You shouldn’t buy a phone if its activation lock is on.

 

The activation lock is relatively new to iOS, and works by preventing anyone from resetting an iPhone without the owner’s Apple ID and password. The feature was introduced in iOS 7 and turned on automatically in iOS 8, making it harder for criminals to sell their ill-gotten merchandise. PC World notes San Francisco iPhone thefts dropped by 38% in the six months after activation lock first launched.

However, hackers have recently succeeded in circumventing the lock, making it more likely that second-hand shoppers could accidently end up with a pilfered product. Now, when you see a deal that looks too good (or too shady) to be true, you’ll be able to confirm those suspicions.

TIME How-To

Shop Amazon Smarter with These Quick Tricks

Amazon
Daniel Acker -- Bloomberg / Getty Images

Many of us have shopped Amazon for years without really digging into some of its handier features. Here’s a quick list of tips and tricks.

Get Alerts When Prices Drop

If you’re keeping an eye on a particular product, you can get alerts when its price drops. Head over to CamelCamelCamel.com, create an account and set up an alert. If the item is in stock and dips below the price threshold you set for it, you’ll be notified.

If you’re not sure what you want, you can check out the most highly discounted items in the site’s Top Drops section.

Get Alerts When Out-of-Stock Items Are Available Again

You can set up this trick directly from Amazon’s site. If an item you want is out of stock, click the “Email me” button to the right of the item’s heading.

To check which items you’re tracking, head to the Availability Alert section of your account to get an overview of which items are back in stock or to cancel alerts for items you don’t care about anymore.

Share Two-Day Prime Shipping with Someone

If you pay $100 a year for Amazon Prime — which includes free two-day shipping on many items, free streaming video, free streaming music and free ebooks — you can share the two-day shipping privileges (but not the other goodies) with up to four family members.

Head over to Manage Prime Membership, and click “Invite a Household Member.” Then enter the person’s name, how they’re related to you, their email address and their birthday. Don’t worry: You can remove people later to make space for new additions as your family bonds strengthen and wither.

Get Text Alerts for Shipment Updates

If you want to keep a close eye on that American Girl doll you ordered for yourse—err…daughter, you can sign up to receive text messages while it’s being shipped.

Head to the Shipment Updates via Text section of your account and enter your mobile number to sign up. Thankfully — or unfortunately, depending how closely you want to track the item – you’ll only get texts between 10am and 11pm Eastern time. No middle-of-the-night wakeup dings, in other words.

Fine Tune Your Email Subscriptions

You can subscribe to get emails about specific item categories sent with varying frequency by checking out the E-Mail Subscriptions section of your account. There, you’ll find everything from apps to wine, along with several subsections for each.

Re-Watch Videos You’ve Purchased

Amazon offers many of its digital videos as time-limited rentals, but if you choose to purchase a video outright, you can watch it again and again. All the movies and TV shows you own can be found in the Your Video Library section of Amazon Instant Video.

Find Items You’ve Looked At Recently

You can take a quick walk down memory lane by cruising the Browsing History section of your account. There, you’ll find a list of recently-ogled items, and can delete items you don’t want showing up in your history at all.

If you want to turn off your browsing history altogether, head over to the Manage Your Browsing History section.

Turn Off Ads That Have Been Personalized to You

Amazon uses your shopping behavior to personalize ads for you based on what the company thinks you like. You might see these ads on Amazon itself or on other websites that display Amazon ads. You can turn off this personalization by heading to the Advertising Preferences section of your account. Note that you’ll still see Amazon ads here and there; they just won’t be personalized to your tastes.

Sell Your Stuff to Other Amazon Shoppers

If you own an item that Amazon is selling, you can sell it yourself directly to other buyers. It’s a pretty quick and simple process.

It doesn’t apply to just any item, but if an item’s eligible, you’ll see a “Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon” link below the “Add to Cart” button on the right-hand side of the product page.

Click the “Sell on Amazon” button, select the item’s condition, the quantity you’re selling, and then set the price. You can upload a photo of the item, too, if you like.

If you choose to ship the item yourself, Amazon will reimburse you for shipping charges. If you want to sell a bunch of items, you can ship them all to Amazon and have the company ship items out to buyers as they sell. Regardless of your shipping method, Amazon will take a cut of each sale; the fee depends on the type of product but it usually isn’t too outrageous.

Have 0.5% of Your Order Go to Charity

Instead of going to Amazon.com to buy stuff, simply go to AmazonSmile.com and select a charity first. There are a handful of spotlight charities to choose from, but you can search for other eligible charities as well. Once that’s set up, you’ll be dropped off at Amazon to shop as you normally would.

If you see an item that says “Eligible for AmazonSmile donation” below the price on the product page, your charity of choice will get half a percent of the item’s purchase price when you check out.

TIME privacy

Celebrity Lawyer Threatens Google With $100 Million Suit Over Nude Selfies

The Daily Front Row Second Annual Fashion Media Awards - Arrivals
Model Kate Upton attends The Daily Front Row Second Annual Fashion Media Awards at Park Hyatt New York on September 5, 2014 in New York City. Rommel Demano—Getty Images

“Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ motto’ is a sham.”

A lawyer representing more than a dozen celebrities whose personal and sometimes nude photos were stolen and shared on the Internet issued a scathing letter to Google that accuses the tech giant of helping the images spread and threatens a $100 million lawsuit.

The letter, written by lawyer Marty Singer and obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, calls Google’s conduct “despicable” for what it says is Google’s failure to remove the images and its “facilitating and perpetuating the unlawful conduct.”

Google did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment, though the firm has removed some images from its sites and links to the images from its search engine. Still, the letter says Google has not done enough. According to the letter, lawyers have asked Google more than a dozen times to remove the images from Google sites like BlogSpot and YouTube, but some of the images are still available several weeks after the initial breach.

Google “has acted dishonorably by allowing and perpetuating unlawful activity that exemplifies an utter lack of respect for women and privacy,” the letter says. “Google’s ‘Don’t be evil’ motto’ is a sham.”

[THR]

TIME Connected Life

New Apps for the Brain

These programs turn learning into a game

It’s common these days to hear of a new mobile game that racks up impressive downloads and sales almost overnight–and then disappears just as fast. A growing raft of gamelike apps hope to stay in your pocket for the long term. How? By offering users the ability to learn a new language, practice web coding or improve their memory. As smartphones become a constant part of the human experience, more and more people are wondering what their phones have done for them lately. So-called brain-training apps propose we spend our downtime bulking up our minds. “There’s a long-term secular trend and consumer interest in health,” explains Kunal Sarkar, the CEO of brain-training company Lumosity. “Taking care of your mind is another part of that.”

The difference from past generations of educational software–think programs that teach typing or basic math–is that these apps feel like games, not homework. More than 18 million people have downloaded Lumosity, a puzzle program created by neuroscientists in collaboration with game designers, since it launched last year. Duolingo, an app that teaches foreign languages, grants users experience points and badges as they learn new grammar skills, much as console titles like Call of Duty do. And Codecademy teaches the basics of computer programming in short tutorials.

Brain apps are hardly a cure-all. Conversing with native speakers remains the best way to learn a foreign language, for example, and some experts question Lumosity’s long-term mental benefits. At the very least, though, these apps work on the same basic concept that teachers have been trying to drill into our heads since kindergarten: learning can be fun.

I WANT TO…

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LEARN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

DUOLINGO

AVAILABLE FOR: Web, iOS, Android

COST: Free

This language-learning app offers courses in Spanish, French, Italian, German and Portuguese. And it’s not all reading and writing–it uses the phone’s microphone to gauge users’ pronunciation skills as well.

IMPROVE MY MEMORY

LUMOSITY

AVAILABLE FOR: Web, iOS, Android

COST: Free trial; $14 per month

Lumosity aims to improve users’ thinking abilities by using simple games and tests that adapt to your cognitive level to improve memory, attention and decisionmaking speed. The company says no two users will have the same experience.

BECOME A PROGRAMMER

CODECADEMY

AVAILABLE FOR: Web, iOS

COST: Free

Programming skills are increasingly important in the digital age, and Codecademy offers in-depth lessons in HTML, JavaScript and other languages. Novices can download the Hour of Code app and learn the basics of programming syntax on the go.

KNOW MORE ABOUT ART

DAILYART

AVAILABLE FOR: iOS, Android

COST: Free

Each day the app presents a different classic painting from storied artists such as van Gogh and Monet. Even if you already know the work, you may not know all the fascinating details the app serves up on the backstory of the art.

BECOME A WORDSMITH

VOCABULARY.COM

AVAILABLE FOR: Web, iOS, Android

COST: $2.99 on mobile

Never again get embarrassed using the wrong word at a dinner party with this app. It boasts more than 120,000 questions that can help you learn over 12,000 words. Users can even battle their friends to see who’s the bigger word geek.

BE A HISTORY BUFF

TODAY’S DOCUMENTS

AVAILABLE FOR: iOS, Android

COST: Free

The U.S. National Archives manages this educational app, which serves up a historical document or photo each day of the year. Past docs have included everything from a letter by Woodrow Wilson creating Mother’s Day to a photo of Gerald Ford as a toddler.

TIME technology

Google Gives San Francisco Free Wi-Fi in Public Places

San Francisco's Civic Center Plaza, a site of many local gatherings and rallies, is among the locations in the city that have free Wi-Fi as of Wednesday, Oct. 1. Jose Aguirre

Organizations are working hard to promote exactly this kind of public-private partnership in the city

On Wednesday, San Franciscans were able to hook their gadgets up to free Wi-Fi that launched in 32 new public locations. All that connectivity was funded by a $608,000 check from Google, in a move that could be seen as the tech behemoth taking steps to foster goodwill amid complaints of rapid gentrification fueled by the tech boom of Silicon Valley.

The free WiFi now available in San Francisco’s playgrounds, recreation centers, plazas and parks also fits in with the company’s long-standing promotion of Internet access in the U.S. and around the world. But lately politicians have more urgently encouraged big tech companies to show serious generosity, in both talent and funds, hoping to ameliorate the tensions that led to protests around “Google buses” earlier in the year.

In this case, after being approached by Mark Farrell, a member of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors, Google agreed to underwrite his plan for complimentary hotspots through a partnership with sf.citi, an organization working hard to promote these feel-good public-private partnerships. Google already gave $6.8 million gift to the city earlier this year, to pay for bus fares of working-class youths.

In an interview conducted last winter, Mayor Ed Lee told TIME that the angst felt toward tech companies bringing an influx of new workers to the city was “perhaps misguided,” partly given the great things that sector is doing for the economy. He added that he had long been working with tech leaders to “be good philanthropic companies” and take part in “the culture of contributing to the society around them.”

On Wednesday, Lee celebrated a victory in bringing San Franciscans of various classes together. “WiFi in our city’s parks is another step toward a larger vision of connectivity for our city as a whole, bridging the digital divide and ensuring that our diverse communities have access to innovation,” he said in a statement.

TIME Technology & Media

This Small Cable Operator May Help Unravel the Pay TV Industry

Obama Appears On Daily Show With Jon Stewart
President Barack Obama chats with Daily Show host Jon Stewart during a commercial break in taping on October 27, 2010 in Washington, D.C. Pool—Getty Images

Suddenlink has dropped Viacom channels from its lineup, perhaps permanently. That's a cardinal sin in the world of pay-TV.

A cable company and a TV network have been in a dispute over how much the network’s content is really worth. This may sound like a familiar tale, but there’s an unusual ending this time. Suddenlink, a St. Louis-based operator with more than 1.1 million subscribers, dropped Viacom’s collection of well-known TV channels from its lineup Wednesday, and they’re probably not coming back anytime soon.

Negotiations over carriage fees, the amount that pay-TV operators pay network owners to carry their channels, often turn into very public spats. Time Warner Cable kicked CBS-owned networks off its channel lineup for a month in 2013, and The Weather Channel went so far as to lobby Congress to force DirecTV to keep the channel on its airwaves earlier this year. In both instances, the two sides eventually reached a truce.

That doesn’t appear to be in the cards this time. Because Suddenlink couldn’t come to an agreement with Viacom on appropriate carriage fees, the cable company has replaced mainstays on the channel dial like MTV and Comedy Central with new additions such as FXX and the Hallmark Channel. Suddenlink thinks its customers won’t miss Viacom’s offerings much. “It’s unfortunate we could not reach agreement,” spokesman Pete Abel said in an email. “But we have moved on and are excited about the new channels we’re adding and our customers have told us they would like to have.”

In the traditional pay-TV model, a cable company dumping Viacom’s channels could be viewed as a cardinal sin. Historically, network owners and cable operators have worked in lockstep to keep their highly lucrative system intact. Operators agree to buy up channels from media conglomerates like Viacom in unwieldy bundles, which means a 26-year-old bachelor is stuck paying for Nickelodeon. Network owners in turn make sure that having a pricey cable subscription is pretty much the only legal way for viewers to see TV shows as they’re airing. Content creators also charge new entrants to the pay-TV space a higher carriage fee for their channels, according to Erik Brannon, a TV industry analyst at IHS Screen Digest. Intel had been planning a pay-TV service that would deliver live television content over the Internet, but the costs of acquiring programming were prohibitively high.

Suddenlink tried to upend this long-standing formula by asking Viacom to sell just a few of the channels that are popular with its customers, like TV Land and Comedy Central. Suddenlink says that Viacom responded by increasing its price demands even more. On a website about the dispute, Viacom says that Suddenlink abruptly stopped negotiating and reneged on a last-minute proposal that met the cable operator’s demands. “We remain committed to reaching a deal so that our viewers will be able to watch their favorite shows,” Viacom wrote on the site. Viacom did not respond to an email from TIME seeking further comment.

The Suddenlink decision could inspire other small and mid-size operators, already being squeezed by subscriber declines, refuse carriage fee increases from media giants. Sixty smaller cable companies, including one with half a million subscribers, lost Viacom’s channels in the spring and haven’t yet restored them. “Mid-tier operators and small operators are going to have to look at the profitability of carrying networks vs. their viewership,” Brannon says. “When you’re in the position of Suddenlink . . . you absolutely do not have the buying power that Comcast or DirecTV have.”

At the same time, channel owners are becoming more receptive to the Internet-based TV services of which they were once wary. Viacom has agreed to offer 22 of its channels on a new, Internet-based TV service that Sony is launching later this year, the first such deal the media giant has made public. The revenue generated from that deal, which Brannon says probably included a guarantee by Sony of a minimum number of subscribers, might make Viacom less concerned about the activities of the smaller traditional cable companies.

Whether these strategic shifts will benefit consumers, networks or cable operators remains to be seen. Suddenlink is hoping that losing Viacom won’t hurt its subscriber numbers, but Cable One, the largest of the sixty cable companies to dump Viacom in the spring, doubled its subscriber loss the quarter it removed Viacom’s channels. And while Internet-based pay-TV services like Sony’s promise an improved user experience, no one has yet broached the topic of offering channels “a la carte” and allowing customers to pick exactly what content they’d like to buy.

Still, the once-sacred marriage between cable operators and network owners is under obvious strain. That leaves room for new entrants to claim a piece of the market—hopefully for many, with business models that are more in line with customer preferences. “Carriage fee negotiations are going to become increasingly contentious,” warns Brannon. “Not only at Viacom but other channel groups.”

TIME LGBT

Facebook Apologizes to Drag Queens Over Suspended Profiles

Facebook Drag Queens
Drag queens Lil Miss Hot Mess, left, and Sister Roma listen to comments about their battle with Facebook during a news conference in at San Francisco City Hall on Sept. 17, 2014 Eric Risberg—AP

Enforcement of a "real-name policy" led to LGBT users being blocked from their accounts

A coalition of LGBT rights advocates met with Facebook representatives at the company’s Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters on Wednesday morning, demanding change to the company’s treatment of their profiles. In recent weeks, many drag queens — people who may go by names like Lil Miss Hot Mess rather than the male-identifying names they were given at birth — said their accounts were suspended because Facebook demanded that they use their “legal names” on their profiles.

While Facebook did acknowledge “the hardship that we’ve put [such users] through in dealing with your Facebook accounts over the past few weeks,” the company also said their policy was never to require legal names — simply “authentic ones.” In a post, chief product officer Chris Cox affirmed that when it comes to members of the LGBT community, the company considers “authentic” names to be whatever those users go by in daily life, regardless of what is scrawled on their birth certificate.

Cox blamed the suspensions on company protocol for dealing with profiles that are reported as fake. Many transgender users and well-known drag queens in the San Francisco community, such as local icon Sister Roma, were among “several hundred” people to have their accounts reported, he said. (He did not name the individual who did the reporting.) Their policy has been to suspend the profile until the user submits some form of identification that matches the name on the page.

David Campos, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, was the lead negotiator for those wanting a fix. He said that in correspondence with affected users, Facebook did in fact use the language “legal name” when asking for identification. But even if there is confusion over the details, Campos emphasized to TIME repeatedly that his group was very happy with outcome of Wednesday’s meeting.

“It was an extremely productive meeting. Drag queens spoke and Facebook listened,” Campos said while driving back from Menlo Park. “Both sides actually agreed on the idea that the objective was for people to use their real name, and that doesn’t always mean legal identity.”

Campos said the meeting started with Facebook apologizing (as the post put up after the meeting does), which is not how their first meeting with Facebook representatives went two weeks ago. “There wasn’t even an acknowledgment that the policy was flawed,” he said. The company’s slow reaction time gave users a chance to flock elsewhere for their online socializing, to places like new social network Ello. The inaction also appeared at odds with the great lengths the company has gone to prove that their site is an inclusive place, notably adding some 50 options for gender identity in February.

In a previous statement issued on Sept. 12, Campos explained why the name issue is such a big one for some LGBT users: “Facebook may not be aware that for many members of the LGBT community the ability to self-identify is a matter of health and safety. Not allowing drag performers, transgender people and other members of our community to go by their chosen names can result in violence, stalking, violations of privacy and repercussions at work.”

On Wednesday, Campos’ group expanded their argument, emphasizing that though “drag queens have become the face of the issue,” there are many demographics that might have a legitimate reason not to use their legal name on their profile, such as victims of violence, political dissidents or even high school teachers who don’t want students checking up on them.

Facebook promised that a “technical fix” would be coming, Campos said, though there was no exact timeline or decision about what a new process or feature might look like like. In his post, Cox emphasized that in “99 percent” cases, fake-name reports signal “bad actors doing bad things,” such as bullying, trolling and espousing hate speech. He also said that the system needs a way to weed out the one percent.

“We see through this event that there’s lots of room for improvement in the reporting and enforcement mechanisms, tools for understanding who’s real and who’s not, and the customer service for anyone who’s affected,” he said. “We’re taking measures to provide much more deliberate customer service to those accounts that get flagged so that we can manage these in a less abrupt and more thoughtful way.”

TIME Companies

Reddit Users May Get Free Shares of the Company

But the plan could "totally fail"

Reddit CEO Yishan Wong told the Reddit community this week he wants to give them 10% of the company’s shares. Such a move has never been carried out by a company that depends on user engagement, like Facebook or Twitter.

Wong cautioned that the plan is still in its early stages and added a caveat to his post on Reddit: “KEEP IN MIND THAT THIS PLAN COULD TOTALLY FAIL.”

Wong also said that the idea of “distributing ownership of [Reddit] back to the community” has been a long-held dream by Wong and many of the company’s other employees.

TIME Companies

Microsoft Skips Windows 9 and Goes Right to Windows 10

The skip is to emphasize the company's effort to move forward

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Microsoft is trying to soften an unpopular redesign of Windows by reviving features from older versions while still attempting to nudge desktop users into a world of touch screens and mobile devices.

The company on Tuesday gave an early preview of the new Windows 10 software, which it aims to begin selling by the middle of next year. Although the current version is called Windows 8, Microsoft says it’s skipping ahead to Windows 10 to emphasize its effort to move forward.

“Windows 10 represents the first step in a whole new generation of Windows,” said Terry Myerson, executive vice president of Microsoft’s operating systems group.

Windows 8 was introduced two years ago as an answer to the growing demand for mobile devices. But many users hated it because its tablet-like design and controls weren’t a good fit for many devices using keyboards and mice. Sales of personal computers continued to fall.

With Windows 10, Microsoft is trying to regain the loyalty of longtime PC users, while reaching out to consumers and businesses that are increasingly adopting touch-screen smartphones and tablets.

Analysts consider the success of the new Windows crucial for Microsoft and new CEO Satya Nadella, who must show that Microsoft can embrace mobile devices without sacrificing the traditional computing experience.

The new system will be a blend of the old and the new. For instance, it will have various controls that are familiar to users of older Windows systems, such as a start menu to quickly access apps. But this start button will also open a series of tiles that resemble what’s found in Windows 8.

Analysts said that more gradual transition is important if Microsoft wants to persuade users to upgrade.

“This is what Windows 8 should have been,” said Carolina Milanesi, a veteran tech analyst at the research firm Kantar Worldpanel. “Here they are doing the right thing.”

Microsoft executives signaled they got that message on Tuesday. They stressed repeatedly that using the next version of Windows won’t be a challenge for businesses or consumers who have continued to use Windows 7 or even earlier versions.

The new software seeks to offer “the familiarity of Windows 7 with some of the benefits that exist in Windows 8,” said Joe Belfiore, a Microsoft executive who oversees Windows design and evolution.

He compared it to buying a new car with a more powerful engine and a better audio system, without having to “learn a new way to drive.”

Windows 10, for instance, will suggest new ways to use or navigate through files, without forcing users to abandon the old way, Belfiore said.

“We’re designing the experience so that as you use it, the things you already know are familiar and present, but new value is presented to you at a rate that’s easier for you to ingest,” he said.

The effort drew tentative praise from several industry experts.

“They desperately needed to find a way to bridge that experience. I just wish they’d done that with Windows 8,” said Rob Enderle, a tech analyst with the Enderle Group.

Milanesi said that while many businesses resisted upgrading to Windows 8, they can’t avoid touch screens as younger workers are accustomed to using phones or tablets as their primary computing device.

Windows 10 will also be designed to work on a wider range of computing devices.

Microsoft currently has three main systems — Windows 8 for traditional computers and tablets, Windows Phone 8 for cellphones and Xbox for its gaming console. By unifying the underlying systems in Windows 10, software developers will be able to create apps for the various devices more easily. Consumers will also be able to switch devices more easily and avoid having to buy the same apps multiple times.

That doesn’t mean the apps will always look the same. Developers will still be able to adapt apps for the various screen sizes, but won’t have to start from the beginning for each version.

User interfaces on the various devices may also differ, even as they share underlying technologies. For now, Microsoft plans to keep the current Xbox interface on the game console.

Enderle said Microsoft’s effort to create a single platform should help lure more developers to write apps — something the company needs to boost usage of Windows tablets and phones.

Windows is the most widely used PC operating system in the world, but it is steadily losing ground as more people turn to smartphones and tablets, which primarily run on operating systems from Microsoft rivals Apple and Google. That’s why Nadella wants to create one system that will run on all devices.

“It’s certainly an ambitious goal, but it’s also a little early to tell how it will work,” said Michael Silver, a tech analyst at Gartner.

Apple and Google have both rejected Microsoft’s approach of unifying the various systems, preferring to keep systems for PCs and mobile devices separate.

Microsoft also touted new security and management features for business customers, which represent a lucrative market for the company. Almost half of all PCs are used in the workplace, according to Gartner.

While a “technical preview” version of the software is being released this week, Microsoft said it won’t be ready to talk about new consumer features until next year.

Microsoft declined to say how much the new software would cost or how it will be distributed. Analysts have speculated that the company might be considering a subscription model — as it has with Office software — rather than selling each new version of Windows separately.

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