TIME apps

6 Must-Know Tricks for Mastering Apple Music

A guide to Apple's powerful but somewhat confusing new app

Apple Music, Apple’s new streaming service, is finally here. The $9.99-per-month service is trying to beat competitors like Spotify and Google Play Music by cramming in as many features as possible: access to 30 million songs on demand, playlists curated by music experts, algorithmically powered radio stations and a live radio station like the ones you hear on the classic FM dial.

All those features add up to make Apple Music an incredibly powerful app, but also one that can be pretty challenging to navigate. Here are five quick tips to make the experience a bit more seamless:

Understanding Apple Music’s Tabs

Apple Music is divided into five main sections, and it’s not exactly obvious what each one does. Here’s a quick breakdown:

  • For You shows you personalized playlists and albums based on the genre and artist preferences you pick out when you first open the app, as well as your play history.
  • New shows a list of new songs and albums, currently popular content, videos and thematic playlists.
  • Radio features Beats 1, Apple’s 24/7 live radio station, and algorithmically driven stations based on genre.
  • Connect is a social network that lets artists connect directly to fans.
  • My Music shows the songs you have in your library, as well as any playlists you’ve built.

Show Only Songs You’ve Downloaded

Apple Music doesn’t do much to help denote which songs are downloaded to your phone and which are floating in the cloud. On the “My Music” tab, you can select the drop-down menu that begins with “Artists” in the middle of the screen and activate the “Music Available Offline” option at the bottom of the menu. That will make it so only songs on your iPhone show up.

Turn Off Your Subscription’s Auto-Renewal

Apple Music comes with a free three-month subscription, but be careful—Apple has already “helpfully” signed you up to begin paying the $9.99 monthly fee via your iTunes account when the trial ends. To make sure you don’t get charged, press the human silhouette icon in the top left corner of Apple Muisc, select “View Apple ID,” then select “Manage” under the Subcriptions header. Select “Apple Music Membership” and then select “Free Trial.” The app should then show you the date your trial is set to end, and it won’t charge you after that time expires.

 

Download Songs Using Cellular Data

By default, the iPhone only downloads songs over Wi-Fi to help prevent large data bills. If you want to be able to download Apple Music songs to your phone via wireless data, go to the Settings menu and then select “iTunes & App Store.” Toggle the “Use Cellular Data” option on, and Apple Music will be able to download songs whenever you have an Internet connection.

See the Upcoming Schedule for Beats 1

Beats 1, Apple Music’s live radio station, is a new twist for music streaming, but presents an age-old problem for music listeners: how do you know what the radio station is going to play next? If you simply click on the “Beats 1” art at the top of the “Radio” tab, you’ll be presented with a schedule of the upcoming shows over the next several hours. Bonus protip: you can add any song playing on Beats 1 to your library by selecting the three periods to the right of the song’s name and clicking “Add to My Music.”

Adjust Your Genre/Artist Preferences

When you first boot up Apple Music, the app will ask you to pick a few favorite genres to help it show you songs catered to your tastes. Later on, if you realize the app is serving you a bit too much death metal, you can change these preferences easily. Click the human silhouette icon in the top left corner, select “Choose Artists for You” and you’ll be taken to the same selection screen for genres and artists that you saw when you first used the app.

TIME Narendra Modi

Here’s How India Is Getting Serious About Wi-Fi

BJP Leader Narendra Modi Campaigns In Gujarat
Kevin Frayer—Getty Images India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

The plan is expected to create millions of jobs

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants to make sure his country’s population can get fast Internet as soon as possible.

In fact, he’s pumping $18 billion into a campaign called “digital week,” which plans to do just that. The move comes after Wi-Fi became available at the iconic Taj Mahal palace for the first time.

“Now we are at a place where we can take off,” a spokesman for Communications and Information Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad told Reuters. “The idea is to bridge the gap between haves and have-nots of services and deliverables.”

The plan’s goal is to create over 100 million jobs for Indian citizens.

In May, Modi, who is known for having a strong social media presence and being technologically savvy, grabbed headlines for clashing with Chinese social media users on the popular Weibo service.

TIME Gadgets

Meet the Home Security Camera That Burglars Totally Ignore

Canary
Canary

The $249 Canary has already helped cops find a suspected robber

For the past eight years, Melanie, whose name has been changed to protect her privacy, shared her Chandler, Ariz. home with several roommates. But when she finally got the place to herself this past spring, she felt her newfound privacy came at the cost of security. So, she decided buy a Canary all-in-one home security device, placing it in the bedroom of her 2,000-square-foot house.

“You don’t think you’re actually going to use it for home security,” says the 43-year-old. “I called it my puppy cam.”

You can indeed see Melanie’s dogs in a video her Canary recorded on May 4. But the device captured something else, too. On that day, a man later identified by police as Brian Pantoja appears to break Melanie’s window, climb inside her home, and rifle through her belongings. According to local news reports, thousands of dollars worth of jewelry went missing from Melanie’s home that day; the investigation remains open as of May. But before apparently pilfering Melanie’s home, Pantoja appears to grab a bottle of water from right in front of the camera that was recording him.

Here’s the footage from Melanie’s Canary, provided by the company and posted here with Melanie’s permission:

“It’s so sleek,” says Melanie. “[Pantoja] had no idea — he looked at it a couple of times . . . he just had no clue.”

In fairness to the burglar, coming in black, white, or silver and about the size of a large soup can, the Canary looks nothing like most webcams. With air vents at the top and no obvious camera lens, it’s not the kind of device you’d expect to find standing vigil over a home. And Pantoja was hardly the first person to be busted by one. Since the device launched in late March, it has caught at least 30 serious incidents on video, the company claims, from alleged burglaries to caretaker abuse and arson.

Other than Canary’s discrete appearance, its 1080p HD camera with a 147-degree viewing angle is the killer feature. Besting the specs of the newly-announced and much ballyhooed Nest Cam, Canary’s video feed looks great on its mobile app, and that was key in solving Melanie’s burglary. Amidst a roomful of police officers, she pulled up the video and zoomed in on the burglar’s face. The authorities recognized him immediately.

“Everybody was just saying they’ve never seen a video that was such good quality,” she says.

Able to detect motion, light, temperature, and humidity, the $249 Canary is more than just a camera. Through the app, Canary can notify users of movement, loud sounds, and changes in air quality when they’re away from home. A built-in microphone lets users talk to the room when they’re away, and an embedded 90-plus decibel siren can scare off intruders at the push of a button.

But as useful as all this sounds, the Canary isn’t for everyone. Digital privacy has become an increasing concern, and gadget makers face an uphill battle in convincing people their private moments are safe from peering eyes online. Melanie never disclosed any trepidation about having a web-connected camera in her bedroom, but my wife shooed my review unit out of our living room like it was one of the neighbor’s cats.

In my wife’s defense — and she is employed as a crime prevention expert — I promised her I would never review a webcam in our home without her permission. But as I set it up in my office instead, she reminded me of an excellent point: devices like Canary will not prevent crimes from occurring. In fact, once a person has broken into your house, that’s already breaking and entering. But, as the Chandler Police Department might attest, it’s clear that cameras like these can help catch the bad guys after the deed is done.

Once I installed the Canary, I also started thinking of it as my puppy cam, watching as my dog pace back and forth while I was out running errands. Though it was nice to know she doesn’t get nervous in my absence, I discovered the Canary itself was on high alert. Via the Canary app and your phone’s GPS, the device knows when you’re home and when you’re away, automatically arming itself when you step out. This is good because you won’t get overwhelmed with sound and motion notifications when you’re walking around your house. That’s also a very robust way of arming the device — by tracking the owner’s (or owners’, as multiple phone-toting users can be detected) location, Canary doesn’t rely on a spotty Bluetooth or Wi-Fi connection with your smartphone to know that you’re home.

But personally, I found this feature a little creepy, as it kept tracking me even after I unplugged the camera. That’s has more to do with how geo-location works than with the Canary itself, but most smartphone users don’t understand that when you allow an app to track your location, it will do that until you tell it to stop.

Still, there’s no way my paranoia would sway Melanie and the dozens of other users who have found the Canary and similar devices to be tremendously helpful home security tools. In her case, even if the culprit hadn’t been caught, she’d find some sort of relief by seeing the crime in action.

“The best part about it for me is that I know exactly what he did,” says Melanie. “There’s no question of, did he hurt my dogs? Did he do something to my bed? I know exactly where he was; I know everything he touched; I know everything he took.” And as a result, the suspected burglar wasn’t able to steal her sense of security.

TIME Steve Jobs

Here’s the Trailer For The Upcoming Steve Jobs Movie

Apple Unveils New Software For iPhone And iPad
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Steve Jobs

It stars Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet

A full trailer for the upcoming biopic of Steve Jobs, the late founder of Apple [fortune-stock symbol=”AAPL”], has just been released.

The trailer, which is two-and-a-half-minutes long, is the first extended look at the movie, which is based on the biography of Jobs written by Walter Isaacson.

Danny Boyle, who won an Academy Award for Slumdog Millionaire in 2008, directed the movie. It stars Michael Fassbender as Jobs, along with Seth Rogen, Jeff Daniels, and Kate Winslet.

According to the film’s official website: “Set backstage at three iconic product launches and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac, Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution to paint an intimate portrait of the brilliant man at its epicenter.”

The movie is due in theaters on Oct. 9.

You can watch the full trailer here:

TIME apps

Snapchat Just Added a Bunch of New Features

Yahoo Set To Invest $20 Million In Snapchat
Peter Macdiarmid—Getty Images In this photo illustration the Snapchat app is used on an iPhone on October 6, 2014 in London, England.

Sore thumbs, rejoice

Ephemeral messaging app Snapchat is rolling out a few new features in an effort to make the software easier to use, the company said in a blog post Wednesday.

Most notably, users no longer have to press their thumb down on the screen while viewing pictures or video they’ve received — sore thumbs rejoice! Now, a simple tap on the screen will suffice.

Snapchat is also adding a new way for users to add friends to their contact list with an “Add Nearby” feature that can come in handy in group situations. Snapcodes, the QR codes people can scan with their phones to instantly add the code’s owner to their contacts, are getting two upgrades: they can now be personalized with a selfie “so that it’s easier for friends to recognize you when you add them on Snapchat,” and they can be shared outside the app.

And last but not least, Snapchat is rolling out two-factor authentication for some added security. The company’s been vulnerable to hackers in the past, including in late 2013 when attackers stole and released the usernames and numbers of some 4.6 million Snapchat users.

TIME Social Networking

Mark Zuckerberg Defends Facebook’s ‘Real Name’ Policy

JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg .

“Real name does not mean your legal name," he wrote during a Q&A

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg defended his company’s “real name” policy against accusations of being discriminatory toward vulnerability communities on Tuesday.

The company’s policy requires users to go by their real names on the social network, which has drawn criticism from transgender people, drag queens, Native Americans, domestic violence survivors and others who say the policy prevents them from being true to their identities and, in some cases, puts them at risk of physical harm offline.

But during a Facebook Q&A with BuzzFeed, Zuckerberg said many critics don’t understand the exact details of Facebook’s requirement, MONEY reports.

“There is some confusion about what our policy actually is,” Zuckerberg wrote. “Real name does not mean your legal name. Your real name is whatever you go by and what your friends call you. If your friends all call you by a nickname and you want to use that name on Facebook, you should be able to do that.

In fact, Zuckerberg said safety is one of the main concerns behind the policy. He wrote that requiring real names makes users less likely to act abusive towards one another and that the policy could prevent users from creating fake profiles to contact and their victims. Still, he acknowledged that Facebook would be taking steps to make sure the site and its policies were inclusive of certain marginalized communities. “We are working on better and more ways for people to show us what their real name is,” he wrote, “so we can both keep this policy which protects so many people in our community while also serving the transgender community.”

[MONEY]

MONEY cell phones

Sprint Cancels Plan to Dramatically Slow Online Videos After Internet Outcry

SAUL LOEB—AFP/Getty Images

Someone read the fine print

Sprint will no longer be slowing internet videos to near dial-up speeds, the company announced on Tuesday.

The wireless carrier had previously introduced an “All-in” plan that rolled unlimited talk, text, data, and the cost of a smartphone into one $80 monthly payment. The Washington Post reported that some users quickly noticed a clause in the plan’s fine print explaining that Sprint would slow video speeds to 600 Kbps, which the Post described as “little better than what you’d get on dial-up.”

Outrage over the video throttling spread quickly online, and on Tuesday night Sprint’s CEO said he would remove the speed restrictions. “No more limits on streaming video,” Marcelo Claure, the carrier’s chief executive, declared in a post on Twitter.

Claure said Sprint may still “manage the network” at some times in order to “reduce congestion,” suggesting Sprint users may still have their speeds throttled during periods of heavy internet use. However, a Sprint representative confirmed to the Post that the company would be removing its two-year-old policy on throttling streaming video for all of the company’s plans, not just for All-in subscribers.

Thanks, internet.

Read Next: Find the Best Cellphone Plan For You

TIME Solutions That Matter

Graphene: The Material Of Tomorrow

Meet the wonder material that is one hundred thousandth of the thickness of a human hair, yet is a hundred times stronger than steel. Graphene has been called "the most exciting material of the 21st century," yet we have barely scratched the surface of what it is capable of doing

MONEY facebook

Facebook’s Zuckerberg Defends Controversial ‘Real Name’ Policy

Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg Hosts Internet.org Summit
Udit Kulshrestha—Bloomberg/Getty Images Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Vulnerable groups have opposed the rule

Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t think Facebook’s real name policy is inherently discriminatory, the social media giant’s CEO said Tuesday.

The real name policy, which requires users to go by their real names on the site, has been criticized by domestic violence survivors, Native Americans, drag queens, and trans users, who say the rule discriminates against their identity and in some cases puts them at risk of physical harm.

In response to a question from BuzzFeed asking whether Facebook would end the policy in light of those concerns, Zuckerberg replied that the real name requirement was essential to Facebook and that the policy’s meaning had been misinterpreted.

“There is some confusion about what our policy actually is,” the CEO wrote during a Facebook Q&A. “Real name does not mean your legal name. Your real name is whatever you go by and what your friends call you. If your friends all call you by a nickname and you want to use that name on Facebook, you should be able to do that.”

The 31-year old executive also emphasized that a real name requirement exists, at least in part, to protect Facebook users. “[The policy] helps keep people safe,” said Zuckerberg. “We know that people are much less likely to try to act abusively towards other members of our community when they’re using their real names. There are plenty of cases — for example, a woman leaving an abusive relationship and trying to avoid her violent ex-husband — where preventing the ex-husband from creating profiles with fake names and harassing her is important. As long as he’s using his real name, she can easily block him.”

This isn’t the first time Facebook has had to answer for the real name policy. Last October, after a number of drag queens were locked out of their accounts for real name violations, the company apologized to LGBTQ users “for the hardship that we’ve put you through in dealing with your Facebook accounts over the past few weeks,” and promised Facebook would develop a new system to review accounts that are reported as fake.

Zuckerberg echoed that promise in his most recent statement on the issue, saying Facebook is “working on better and more ways for people to show us what their real name is so we can both keep this policy which protects so many people in our community while also serving the transgender community.”

But the policy’s opponents have reason to be skeptical of the CEO’s latest assurance. Since the company first vowed to reform their real name system, a number of users have continued to have their accounts locked for perceived policy violations. Writer Lux Alptraum said she was banned for not using a real name in February, and Facebook gave her no recourse to contest the decision.

“The only option I was offered was to update my name; there was no option to contact a Facebook representative or even submit any documentation to support my online identity,” wrote Alptraum.

TIME facebook

Here’s Why Facebook Just Changed Its Logo

It's a more modern design

Chances are you missed a subtle change to Facebook’s logo Tuesday.

The company has refreshed the logo, which displays the full spelling of the brand. The most conspicuous amendment lies in the shape of the ‘a': it’s now rounded off to a single-story as opposed to its previous double-story version. The letters are also slimmer, and there’s also more white all round.

“We set out to modernize the logo to make it feel more friendly and approachable,” Facebook creative director Josh Higgins told Brand New.

The new logo is also apparently better suited to viewing on mobile devices. “This is actually a huge change and it’s much more than the ‘a,’” Howard Belk, co-chief executive and chief creative officer of branding firm Siegel+Gale, told the Wall Street Journal. “It’s driven by mobile.”

The result of a collaboration between Facebook’s in-house team and Process Type Foundry’s Eric Olson, the new Facebook logo will be showing up across Facebook sites and apps soon. The familiar ‘f’ stand-alone logo on the upper corner of Facebook’s main site – also called a favicon – will stay as it is.

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