TIME Sports

See Boston Marathoners Celebratory Photos

From selfies to colorful costumes, here are the best photographs Boston marathoners and spectators shared on social media today

TIME United Kingdom

Female Chess Legend: “We Are Capable of the Same Fight as Any Other Man”

Judit Polgar, Hungarian chess grandmaster.
Ondrej Nemec—Getty Images Judit Polgar, Hungarian chess grandmaster.

“It’s not a matter of gender, it’s a matter of being smart,” Judit Polgar says

Judit Polgar, one of the world’s top chess players, has hit back against a claim by another of the game’s stars that men are naturally better chess players.

“We are capable of the same fight as any other man, and I think during the decades that I actively played chess I proved it as well,” Polgar told TIME in an interview Monday. The native Hungarian became a chess prodigy along with her two sisters and broke Bobby Fischer’s record to become the youngest grandmaster at age 15 in 1991. It’s not a matter of gender, it’s a matter of being smart,” the grandmaster added.

Polgar’s comments came after a storm erupted over Nigel Short’s remarks that people should “gracefully accept it as a fact” that women possess different skills than men, while also suggesting that women are worse drivers.

“I don’t have the slightest problem in acknowledging that my wife possesses a much higher degree of emotional intelligence than I do,” he told New in Chess magazine. “Likewise, she doesn’t feel embarrassed in asking me to maneuver the car out of our narrow garage. One is not better than the other, we just have different skills.”

Polgar, who announced her retirement last year, pointed out that she had defeated Short “quite a few times.” She also defeated Garry Kasparov, widely considered to be the finest chess player in history, in 2002.

“I grew up in what was a male dominated sport, but my parents raised me and my sisters [to believe] that women are able to reach the same result as our male competitors if they get the right and the same possibilities,” she said.

Polgar, who founded the Judit Polgar Chess Foundation to use chess as an education tool, says she sees roughly an equal number of young boys and girls competing in chess at equal levels. But she says fewer girls pursue chess later on, in part because they choose not to and in part because they do not receive the same encouragement from parents, teachers and other people around them.

“Whenever I speak to parents or to kids, I always encourage them that if they believe, if they do the work, if they are really dedicated, then they can do it,” she says. “No matter whether they are a boy or a girl.”

TIME Running

Meet the Man Who Won’t Stop Running

Scott Jurek has been an Ultramarathoner for twenty years

Scott Jurek thought Ultramarathoners were crazy, until he tried his first one.

Twenty years ago Jurek considered himself an average runner, but after falling in love with the long distances of Ultramarathoning — any race over the traditional 26-mile marathon — he really found his groove.

He has won the Western States 100-mile race seven straight times, the Badwater 135 mile race twice, and the 153 mile Spartathalon three times. In 2010 he set an American record at the 24-hour World Championships, running a total of 6.5 marathons in 24 hours.

Two decades after he ran his first Ultramarathon, Jurek is still going strong. He hopes to use his success in his unconventional sport to inspire others to push their minds and bodies beyond what they ever thought was possible.

TIME Sports

See Triumphant Photos of Boston Marathon Runners Through History

The annual event, which takes place on April 20 this year, has been running for more than a century

The 119th Boston Marathon, taking place on April 20, 2015, is sure to be an occasion for remembrance of the tragic crimes that were committed at the race two years ago. As the city continues to recover from that wound, it’s also worth remembering that the marathon has long been a symbol of perseverance, in which runners can conquer obstacles both personal and societal. Here’s a look back at some of those victories.

Read about the history of the Boston Marathon, here in the TIME Vault: A Long Running Show

TIME golf

Jim Furyk Tops Kevin Kisner in Playoff to Win RBC Heritage

Jim Furyk during the final round of the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head Island, S.C. on April 19, 2015.
Theodore A. Wagner—AP Jim Furyk plays during the final round of the RBC Heritage in Hilton Head Island, S.C., on April 19, 2015

"But I was starting to feel like this game is beating me up, and the losing hurts a lot more than winning feels good," Jim Furyk said

(HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C.) — Jim Furyk had gone 100 starts without winning, a stretch that gnawed at his psyche and challenged his confidence.

That all disappeared in uncharacteristic fashion Sunday when he won his first PGA Tour title in five years with birdies on both playoff holes to outlast Kevin Kisner at the RBC Heritage. When the winning putt fell on the par-3 17th, the typically reserved Furyk dropped his putter and punched the air.

“I think getting excited on 17 there was a lot of pent-up frustrations,” he said.

Furyk won for the second time at RBC Heritage, the other coming in 2010 in what turned out to be the best year of his career. He won two other events, including the Tour Championship, and captured the $10 million FedEx Cup.

Furyk won the 2003 U.S. Open and entered this tournament ranked 10th in the world, but he has struggled to close out events. He was 0-of-9 when leading tournaments after three rounds since that Tour Championship victory. He is 44 and always believed he’d win again.

“But I was starting to feel like this game is beating me up, and the losing hurts a lot more than winning feels good,” he said. “I think I just forget how good” it feels to win.

With that came a $1.062 million payday. For Kisner, it was his best finish on the PGA Tour.

Furyk led by a stroke when Kisner birdied the 72nd hole to force the playoff, the fourth in the last six tournaments at Harbour Town Golf Links. On the first extra hole, Kisner rolled in a second straight birdie putt on the 18th. But Furyk answered with a birdie to keep the playoff going. After Kisner missed his birdie try on No. 17, Furyk sank a 12-foot putt for his 17th career PGA Tour victory.

Furyk shot a 63 and Kisner a 64, leaving them both at 18-under 266. Third-round leader Troy Merritt was at 16 under after a 69. Defending champion Matt Kuchar (68) was at 14 under and Masters winner Jordan Spieth (70) was eight shots back.

It was an odd tournament for Furyk.

He looked as if he’d get left behind early, making 18 pars in the first round to fall five shots back. Furyk found his game Friday with eight birdies on the way to a 64. He had a 68 Saturday, yet knew he needed to fire himself as he did Friday to have a chance.

Boy, did he ever.

Furyk had six birdies on his first nine holes, including a 48-footer on the par-4 eighth that moved him in front. A bogey on the 11th dropped Furyk into a four-way tie for first, but he responded with birdies on three of the next four holes and seemed set for an easy ride.

When his long putt on No. 8 rolled in, Furyk said he began to think “this may be the day.” Kisner, though, chased him down on the back nine. He birdied the 14th and 15th to pull within a stroke and stuck his approach on the signature lighthouse hole at No. 18 within 7 feet for a tying birdie.

Kisner kissed his wife, Brittany, and 10-month old daughter Kathleen on the way to the scoring trailer to prepare for more golf.

Furyk is used to such grinding at Harbour Town. When he won in 2010, Brian Davis tied him on the final hole to force a playoff — won by Furyk when Davis struck a loose impediment on his swing and called a penalty on himself.

Kisner expected Furyk, who made 11 birdies in 20 holes, to tie him after his putt on the first playoff hole.

“You don’t expect a guy of Jim’s caliber to miss a 6-footer straight up the hill,” Kisner said.

Merritt fell to third after a third 69. His other score was a course-record tying 61 in the second round Friday. Merritt couldn’t keep up with Furyk’s charge and lost his chance after hitting out of bounds on No. 12 and taking double bogey. Merritt made up for it a few holes later with an eagle-2 on No. 16.

Spieth closed an amazing five-tournament stretch. He won the Valspar Championship a month ago and followed that with seconds at the Texas and Houston opens before matching Tigers Woods’ record of 18 under at Augusta National. For Spieth, 19 of his past 20 rounds have been under par.

Spieth had a whirlwind media tour in New York on Monday and Tuesday before arriving at Hilton Head. Now the 21-year-old Texan wants to get back to Dallas in time to attend the Academy of Country Music Awards. He’ll return to golf in two weeks at the World Golf Championship Match Play event.

Divots: Tom Watson finally played like his age, the 65-year-old finishing with a 5-over 76 after making the cut at Harbour Town with a birdie on the 18th hole Friday. Watson says playing tour courses is taking a toll on “this old body.” … Golfers went off in groups of three on the first and 10th tees starting at 7:30 a.m. to beat expected stormy weather later in the day.

TIME NFL

Tim Tebow to Philly? Now Chip Kelly’s Just Messing With Minds

All State Sugar Bowl - Alabama v Ohio State
Sean Gardner—Getty Images Tim Tebow walks onto the field during the All State Sugar Bowl at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on January 1, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

By signing the ex-Florida star, Philadelphia's coach adds to his off-season intrigue

No one man has messed with the mind of American football fandom quite like Chip Kelly this off-season. Since the Super Bowl, everyone has been wondering what the heck this guy is doing. Kelly, the coach of the Philadelphia Eagles, won a power struggle to control the team’s personnel decisions; he’s treated the job like a crazed chemistry experiment. And now Tim Tebow is in the mix.

Is Kelly trying to blow up the lab? Tebow, who hasn’t played in a regular season NFL game since 2012, is a strange infatuation. For a player with little obvious NFL talent, he draws outsized attention. Tebowing was a thing way back in 2011, when the ex-Heisman Trophy winner led the Denver Broncos to a surprise playoff berth. Denver boss John Elway seemed to act like that run happened in spite of, rather than because of, Tebow’s ability: Elway grabbed Peyton Manning on the free agent market the first chance he got. Tebow had a maddening season with the New York Jets — he barely got on the field — and after a training camp with the New England Patriots in 2013, he was out of the NFL. He spent this past season as a college football analyst for the SEC Network. He flourished in that role.

Normally, if a team signs a TV announcer as the fourth-string quarterback, that news doesn’t overshadow events like, say, the NBA Playoffs, where the some world’s most talented athletes are actually engaged in high-stakes competition. But just look and the characters involved, and consider the state of our sporting obsessions. The NFL’s power has stretched across the calendar; the draft, on April 30, has nearly become a Super Bowl onto itself. So has off-season free agency. Watching the organized violence isn’t enough. We need to stress about what uniforms the participants will wear.

So here comes Kelly, who’s traded two away one of the team’s quarterbacks (Nick Foles) and its star running back (LeSean McCoy), both of whom have reached Pro Bowls. He also watched wide receiver Jeremy Maclin, another Pro Bowler, sign with Kansas City. He signed Dallas’ DeMarco Murray, the NFL’s leading rusher this season, and traded for St. Louis Rams quarterback Sam Bradford, a former Heisman winner who’s been inconsistent. And now he’s bringing on Tebow, whose open broadcasting of his Christian beliefs permanently placed him on the front lines of the culture wars. That, and his throwing motion, which gave him a permanent seat at dive bar debates: can anyone win with such an ugly release?

Prepare for stories on how Tebow’s mechanics have been overhauled, how Kelly’s system can utilize Tebow’s dual-threat skills. But remember: this April signing does not mean that Tebow will make the team come September. Still, you’ve got to hand it to Chip Kelly. To make America even more neurotic about football: that’s no easy feat.

TIME Boston Marathon

The Running Club Where Boston Bombing Survivors Take Strides Together

The members of " 415 Strong" are running the Boston marathon on Monday, two years after the terrorist attack that changed all of their lives

The members of the 415 Strong running group have little in common in their day-to-day lives. There’s a man who owns a small business, a teacher who does volunteer work in her spare time, a woman who works in real estate. Some of them have kids and others aren’t thinking about starting a family. Some enjoy running, while others never could have pictured themselves running for four hours without stopping.

What ties the group together is that fraction of a mile on Boylston Street in Boston where they all happened to be standing on April 15, 2013 when a pair of brothers executed the most devastating terrorist attack in the United States since 9/11. In the wake of a tragedy, the group formed through word of mouth and began meeting regularly in Boston to trade recovery stories and advice.

“We were strangers, but we all went through the same thing,” said Sabrina Dello Russo, 39, a real estate project manager who suffered a shrapnel injury and now has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). “People who didn’t experience what I did don’t understand, but I can easily talk to the 415 team.”

On Monday, 25 members of 415 Strong will return to the Boston Marathon finish line. But this time, they won’t be spectators—they will be running, together, past the scene of the attack that changed all of their lives. The journey of training physically and mentally for this marathon has been a way to bond, and also a way to heal.

“We’re all in it for a common goal. To heal, to build resiliency, to reach new levels,” said Elizabeth Bermingham, 31, an elementary school teacher who suffered shrapnel wounds and a burst eardrum. “It gives empowerment for healing.”

For most of the members of 415 Strong, running was not a passion before the marathon. Given the location and timing of the bombs, most of the people injured were spectators, many of whom had no running experience. But when the Boston Athletic Association (BAA) offered in the fall of 2013 to give free entry to the marathon to anyone who had been hurt, many jumped at the opportunity.

Dave Fortier, one of the few runners injured in the bombing, helped turn the support group into the 415 Strong running group. He planned training sessions and enlisted the help of professional marathoner Jack Fultz to help novices prepare. Some survivors were able to run in 2014, but many decided to spend more time training and will be running for the first time Monday. Participating in the race provides an opportunity for victims “to take back the marathon,” Fortier said.

415 Strong, named for the month and day of the bombing, has remained a support group as well. Dello Russo, who was on the sidelines waiting for a friend to pass when the bombs went off, said she has a “love-hate relationship” with running, but encouragement from the group gets her through each run. When the group isn’t running, Dello Russo appreciates the company of people who experienced the same tragedy in the same way.

“I can’t be in a stressful environment where people are loud and everyone is yelling. I tend to remove myself. People who didn’t experience what I did don’t understand that,” she said.

The group also provides an outlet for discussion, where Dello Russo can talk openly about her fear of crowds. She says she couldn’t have returned to the race as a spectator, but running the marathon with the support of her friends has allowed her to work through her PTSD. Fortier, who runs a small telecommunications company, found his doctor through the group. In recent months, the group has been a place to discuss the trial of now-convicted marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

“The emotions surrounding it took me by surprise. I’m really not sure I totally figured it out yet,” Bermingham said of Tsarnaev’s guilty verdict. “That day my phone just didn’t stop buzzing with the marathon family just checking in.”

While the trial and the second anniversary of the bombing have brought the events back into the limelight, members of the group say they’ll remain friends long after the media attention fades and the bombing becomes history. Much of what they talk about these days is their families and their many interests outside running.

For Fortier, 415 Strong plays a bigger role than simply providing a place to talk about experiences. “We all came together out of something very tragic. There is evil in this world and there’s a lot of it, and we experienced some of it on Boylston that day,” he said. “But there’s so much more good than bad.”

TIME hockey

LA Kings Player Jarret Stoll Arrested on Drug Charges

Jarret Stoll
Larry MacDougal—AP NHL profile photo on Los Angeles Kings' Jarret Stoll during a game against the Calgary Flames in Calgary, Alberta on April 9, 2015.

The hockey forward was suspected of having cocaine

Los Angeles Kings player Jarret Stoll was arrested Friday in Las Vegas on suspicion of possession of cocaine, according to multiple reports.

The hockey forward and boyfriend of Dancing with the Stars co-host and sports reporter Erin Andrews was arrested at the Wet Republic pool at the MGM Grand hotel, Las Vegas Metro police confirmed to CBS.

Stoll, 32, was being held at the Clark County Detention center Las Vegas police Lt. Michael Mauntel told the Associated Press.

The L.A. Kings released a statement on Twitter on Friday night, saying, “We are aware of police reports out of Clark County, Nevada regarding Jarett Stoll. Our organization is concerned and has begun conducting a thorough investigation. While we continue to actively gather facts, we are withholding further comment at this time.”

A rep for Andrews could not immediately be reached for comment.

This article originally appeared on People.com

TIME Basketball

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Recovering From Quadruple Coronary Bypass Surgery

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network And Stand Up To Cancer Discuss The Importance Of Cancer Research
Paul Morigi—WireImage/Getty Images NBA hall-of famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar speaks at The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network and Stand Up To Cancer discussion on the importance of cancer research at Cannon House Office Building in Washington on March 17, 2015.

Doctors said the basketball legend was on track to a full recovery

The NBA’s all-time leading scorer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar underwent what his doctors are calling a successful quadruple coronary bypass survey on Thursday.

The operation was performed by Dr. Richard Shemin, UCLA’s chief of cardiac surgery, after Abdul-Jabbar, a TIME columnist, was admitted to the hospital this week with cardiovascular disease. Sherman said in a statement that he expected Abdul-Jabbar, 68, to make a full recovery.

“At this time, Abdul-Jabbar would like to thank his surgical team and the medical staff at UCLA, his alma mater, for the excellent care he has received. He is looking forward to getting back to his normal activities soon,” read a statement from the hospital.

“He asks that you keep him in your thoughts and, most importantly, cherish and live each day to its fullest.”

TIME Football

Johnny Manziel Apologies to Browns Fans After Troubled Rookie Season

Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel watches from the sidelines in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game against the Cincinnati Bengals in Cleveland on Dec. 14, 2014.
Tony Dejak—AP Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel watches from the sidelines in the fourth quarter of an NFL football game against the Cincinnati Bengals in Cleveland on Dec. 14, 2014.

Quarterback says he wants to focus on football in coming months

Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel has apologized to his team and his fans, saying he let them down in his difficult rookie season. In a statement released Friday, Manziel acknowledged that he had disappointed many people close to him and said he planned to work hard to regain everyone’s trust and respect. “I understand that will take time and will only happen through what I do and not what I say,” he said in the statement.

In January Manziel entered rehab at Caron, a treatment center in Pennsylvania that specializes in drug and alcohol issues. The decision followed a rookie season in which he performed poorly on the field and was involved in a number of off-the-field incidents involving drinking and partying. “I also understand there’s a lot of curiosity about this but anyone who has a friend or family member that’s been through things like this knows it’s an ongoing process,” he said, referring to his stint in rehab. “I’m going to continue to ask folks to try to respect my privacy as I determine to what degree I am comfortable talking about a subject which I consider very personal.”

Manziel is expected to rejoin Browns team practices next week. “I look forward to seeing my teammates next week and focusing on football and my desire to be the best possible player, teammate, and man that I can be,” he said.

Read next: Why NFL Players Are So Likely to Declare Bankruptcy

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