TIME

Bruce Jenner Is ‘Transitioning Into a Woman’

13th Annual Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational Gala At ARIA Resort & Casino
Bruce Jenner at the 13th annual Michael Jordan Celebrity Invitational gala on April 4, 2014 in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller—Getty Images

A source close to the former Olympian confirmed he's making a big lifestyle change

People have been talking about Bruce Jenner’s changing appearance for months, and now PEOPLE reports, “the former Olympian will soon be living life as a female.”

“Bruce is transitioning to a woman,” says a source close to the family. “He is finally happy and his family is accepting of what he’s doing. He’s in such a great space. That’s why it’s the perfect time to do something like this.”

Read the rest of the story at People

TIME Food & Drink

A Festive Super Bowl Menu Fit for Patriots Fans

Celebrate the Patriots with this traditional New England cuisine

Show your support on game day by serving up dishes that feature ingredients found in the New England Patriots’ home state of Massachusetts. Or, try this menu if you’re rooting for the Seattle Seahawks.

 

  • Seafood Chowder With Crispy Breadcrumbs

    crispy breadcrumbs chowder
    Con Poulos

    Nothing represents New England quite like chowder (or, “chowda”). Prepare a batch of this creamy seafood chowder for your guests to enjoy while they cheer on the Patriots. Baked breadcrumbs provide a delicious crunch to a velvety blend of clams (littleneck or cockles) and white fish (cod, sea bass, or halibut).

    Get the recipe.

  • Lobster Rolls With Corn and Celery

    lobster rolls
    Gentl & Hyers

    Take the stress out of cooking for a crowd by making lobster rolls out of frozen tails (as opposed to whole live lobsters). Not only does it require a lot less work, but it’ll also save you money. Most New England restaurants serve lobster rolls made with butter rather than mayonnaise. Simply omit the mayonnaise from this version for a more traditional take.

    Get the recipe.

  • Baked Beans

    baked beans
    Christopher Baker

    This irresistible side has all the makings of traditional Boston baked beans—the dish gets a hint of sweetness from molasses, while sliced bacon lends just the right amount of saltiness. Though this recipe only requires 20 minutes of hands-on cooking time, you’ll need to plan ahead to accommodate the nearly three hours of baking time. Don’t be deterred, the payoff in flavor is worth the extra effort.

    Get the recipe.

  • Easy Popovers

    popovers
    Christopher Baker

    The perfect accompaniment to an indulgent dinner on a cold night, this foolproof popover recipe requires just five minutes of hands-on time and turns out every time. Simply butter a muffin tin, whisk the ingredients together, divide evenly into the muffin tin, and bake approximately 30 minutes until the popovers are puffy and golden brown.

    Get the recipe.

  • Vodka Cranberry Cooler

    vodka
    Dwight Eschiliman

    Because cranberry cultivation began in Massachusetts in the early 1800s, it has since become the official state fruit. This festive cocktail features a homemade simple syrup that helps to highlight the fruit’s tart flavor. Simply combine the cranberries, sugar, and water; bring to a boil and then simmer for 5 minutes. Let cool before adding the tonic water, vodka, and lime juice to the cranberry syrup. Serve over ice and top off with a splash of cream soda.

    Get the recipe.

    This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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TIME Food & Drink

The Ultimate Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl Menu

Gear up for Sunday's big game with these tastes of the Seahawks' home state

Gear up for the big game with dishes that highlight ingredients found in the Seattle Seahawks’ home state of Washington. Or, try this menu if you’re rooting for the New England Patriots.

 

  • Grilled Teriyaki Wings

    teriyaki wings
    Christopher Barker

    In Seattle, it’s easy to find great Teriyaki. Ditch the Buffalo wing recipe and bring a taste of the Emerald City home with these finger-licking teriyaki chicken wings. Simply toss chicken wings on the grill (a grill pan will work just fine if you prefer to stay indoors or don’t have a grill), brush with teriyaki sauce, and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds. Then, watch them disappear in a flash.

    Get the recipe.

  • Ginger-Scallion Salmon Burgers With Miso Yogurt

    salmon burger
    Marcus Nilsson

    Seattle’s world famous Pike Place Market is chock full of fishmongers who sell freshly caught seafood, like wild salmon. Pick up just over a pound of fresh salmon fillet to make these unique burgers, then prepare the impressive and tasty toppers: a spicy carrot-jalapeño slaw and a five-minute miso yogurt sauce.

    Get the recipe.

  • Creamy Broccoli and Apple Slaw

    broccoli apple slaw
    David Prince

    Washington grows 58 percent of the apples produced in the United States, so this crunchy slaw is a natural fit for a menu rich with the state’s most popular ingredients (apple is the state fruit, after all). Simply combine finely chopped broccoli, apple, cranberries, and pine nuts with a creamy homemade dressing made with yogurt, mayonnaise, vinegar, shallots, salt, and pepper.

    Get the recipe.

  • Dutch Baby with Fresh Fruit

    dutch baby
    Charles Masters

    When the fourth quarter begins, swap out the finger foods for a delicious dessert. This Dutch baby, also known as a German pancake, is easy to make (it takes fewer than 30 minutes) and is topped with vanilla ice cream and a medley of stone fruit and cherries, another crop widely harvested in Washington.

    Get the recipe.

  • Espresso Slushy

    espresso slushy
    Charles Maraia

    What better nod to the home of some of the country’s best coffee than an ice-cold espresso slushy? To make your own, combine homemade simple syrup with instant espresso, lemon juice and zest, then freeze for approximately 2 hours. When ready to serve, drizzle the drink with heavy cream. Bonus: This beverage doubles as an after dinner pick-me-up, so you can enjoy the rest of the game without slipping into a food coma.

    Get the recipe.

    This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com.

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TIME Body Image

Bye, Bye, Barbie: 2015 Is the Year We Abandon Unrealistic Beauty Ideals

Cali Girl Barbie waves from the front seat of a Chevy SSR du
Cali Girl Barbie waves from the front seat of a Chevy Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

As Barbie sales figures continue to drop, unrealistic ideals are losing clout both in the toy and fashion world

It may be time for Mattel to roll out Retirement Barbie. Friday morning, the toy-maker announced that the doll’s sales dropped 16% in 2014, marking Barbie’s third consecutive year of falling earnings.

“The reality is, we just didn’t sell enough Barbie dolls,” CEO Bryan Stockton explained to investors last January, following Mattel’s disappointing 13% drop for 2013. The decline of the company’s premier product lead in part to Stockton’s resignation on Monday. But a corporate shakeup might not be enough to counteract the almost 56-year-old doll’s waning allure. The problem might not be sales strategies, but rather the doll and the impossibly slim body ideals she represents.

The push for more realistic, “body positive” images of girls has been gaining momentum over the least year and not just in toys. In 2014, Barbie sales plummeted, while a doll with an average woman’s proportions gained viral success; full-bodied models were integrated into high fashion campaigns without fanfare; e-retailer ModCloth announced an anticipated doubling of its sales after introducing plus sizes; the single All About That Bass which celebrates curvy bodies became such a commercial success that, no, you will never get it out of your head; and Kim Kardashian’s famously ample butt broke the internet.

After decades of false starts, maybe we are finally ready to move away from unattainably slim ideals.

Fashion: Plus Size Integration Isn’t a Passing Trend

When we think of lingerie ads, winged Victoria’s Secret Angels flutter through our minds. But in November, alone, three high fashion institutions displayed a fuller understanidng of feminine beauty.

Seductively posed in a rubber leotard, Candice Huffine debuted as the first plus-size model to be featured in Pirella’s prestigious calendar in December:

A Vogue online gallery featured sexy lingerie starred women with F rather than B cup sizes. “Going into this, we assumed that the beautiful, delicate, lacy bras that we all prefer would only be available in the smaller cup sizes, but we were thrilled to find a real wealth of options for a huge variety of body shapes,” editor Jorden Bickham tells TIME in an email.

And Calvin Klein used Myla Dalbesio in its “Perfectly Fit” underwear campaign. Dalbesio, a size 10, told Elle, “It’s not like [Calvin Klein] released this campaign and were like ‘Whoa, look, there’s this plus-size girl in our campaign.’ They released me in this campaign with everyone else; there’s no distinction. It’s not a separate section for plus-size girls.” (This interview incited misappropriated backlash against CK when the Twitterverse thought Dalbesio was incorrectly cast under the “plus size” category — she wasn’t).

While the internet reacted to the seamless integration of fuller bodied models into these campaigns, the models were presented by designers without fanfare.

“There were no big tamborines, no big calling out of the size thing,” Emme, widely regarded as the first plus-size supermodel (even though she eschews the moniker), tells TIME. “It’s just so old. Saying ‘Oh she’s plus size, yippee!’ and making a big deal of that.”

Tess Holliday

Although there was certainly fanfare when size 22 model Tess Holliday was signed to MiLK Model Management last week — making her the first model of her size to ever be represented by a major agency.

“It was unheard of, I never even tried to get with an agency,” Holliday, 29, tells TIME. “One of my friends even said, ‘Isn’t it crazy that you’re in the news for being the biggest plus size model when you’re the true size of a plus size woman.'” Holliday says that the average plus size model is between size 8 and 10, even though the average plus size woman is bigger. “There has always been an issue with [designers] using smaller plus size models and if they wanted one who was a little bit bigger or curvier, they would pad her because they said they couldn’t find good quality models above a size 16.”

In the past, Holliday was barred from castings due to her size. But in the past week, Holliday says at least designers who refused to work with her in the past have now called to book her for a job. “If they want me then they’ll pay for it.”

Many of Holliday’s critics complain that she sets an unhealthy example for women, but the model notes that she is active, has a trainer, and works out at least four times a week. It should also be noted that just as skinniness does not connote healthiness, being a plus size doesn’t connote unhealthiness.

While Holliday is currently an anomaly, Muse Model Management president Conor Kennedy tells TIME that the fashion industry opening its doors to a variety of body sizes is a consistent movement rather than a “flavor in the moment” passing trend.

Vogue

“A few years ago there was a little burst where there was an Italian Vogue cover”—in which plus-size models seductively posed over… spaghetti—”and then V Magazine did a shoot, and then it tailored off,” he says. “The past two years it’s very different because there are all types of editorials. I think that the next breakthrough we are looking for are campaigns, and we’re starting to see it now.” Curvier celeb cover subjects like Kim Kardashian and Jennifer Lopez are also changing perceptions in the fashion industry.

Kennedy has noticed increased excitement on the creative side of the industry over a diversity of sizes as a desirable aesthetic choice and greater openness in castings.

“But there’s an evolution on both sides of the spectrum,” he says. “It’s also a great thing for business.”

Retailers Finally Recognize an Untapped Market

Clothing makers are finally beginning to understand that if they increase their offerings — and we’re talking fashionable offerings rather than an increased muumuu selection — in the “plus size” category, it will be beneficial to their bottom line. With the “average” American woman wearing a size 14, that’s potentially 100 million potential customers.

“It’s a huge market and it’s totally underserved” ModCloth co-founder Susan Gregg Koder told CNBC.

When Koder decided to expand the e-retailer’s plus size division, she reached out to 1,500 vendors for help — and only 35 responded. But a year into the expansion, with 100 vendors on board, Koder told Business Insider that she expected sales to double in 2014.

According to the market research firm NPD Group, plus-size clothing sales increased 5% last year to $17.5 billion. E-retailers are taking advantage of this rise. In December, plus size fashion e-retailer ELOQUII raised $6 million in Series A funding. But brick and mortar retailers still have room for improvement.

But the quality must improve as well because, at the moment, full bodied women are searching for — but often not finding — fashionable outfits that go up to their size. Stylist Sal Perez explained the difficulties in trying to dress Rebel Wilson for her role in Pitch Perfect 2 to the New York Times.

“I am horrified by some of the clothes I find in the stores,” she said. “I don’t know anyone who enjoys wearing polyester.”

Target premiers its plus-size line

After interacting with six different designers who wouldn’t dress her for the Oscars, Melissa McCarthy decided to launch a fashion label of her own that will offer both plus and “regular” size clothing.

Larger retailers are finally getting the message as well. In mid-February, Target will launch a plus-size line called Ava & Viv that is designed specifically for “the plus-size woman who loves fashion.”

“Women want to go shopping together,” Emme says. “If you eliminate the plus size department that’s always in the basement or next to maternity, and you increase the numbers of 14, 16 and 18’s, you are going to make more money than you have ever made.”

To illustrate her point, Emme recalls a plus-size fashion show she attended with her daughter at Macy’s. At the end of the show, the 13-year-old asked if Emme thought a particular dress came in her size — she didn’t see it as undesirable for a larger demographic, but as beautiful clothing displayed on a beautiful model who she would like to replicate.

“A lightbulb went off,” Emme says. “I don’t think the younger generation sees it as size. They see beauty as it is.”

The End of Barbie

New trends in toy sales serve as fiscal evidence that children also want natural, realistic beauty — rather than unattainable ideals. Barbie, who has seen her share of criticism for being an anatomically impossible mutant, is losing her clout among girls–and their parents. As people stopped buying Barbies, they crowd-funded an alternative to the tune of $500,000.

Touted as the “normal Barbie,” Lammily dolls are built to the measurements of an average woman, based on CDC data.

The “normal” Barbie, created by Nickolay Lamm, Lammily

“This is the doll people have been waiting for,” Lamm told TIME when he prepared to ship tens of thousands of dolls to eager backers before the holidays.

“She looks like a regular girl going to school,” a second grader said when she was presented with a Lammily doll.

“She’s not like other dolls,” said another. “She looks real.”

One of the reasons that Lamm was able turn the Lammily doll from a concept to an actual product was because his original sketches of the “normal Barbie” — meant to simply be an art project — went viral. Its traction online indicated to Lamm how thirsty people were to celebrate the beauty of reality.

While #thinspiration and unhealthy body ideals that promote eating disorders or worse certainly exist on social networks, an easily outraged Twitterverse is quick to call companies out for promoting body negative ideology.

People will no longer stand for Victoria’s Secret creating an advertisement that puts the wording “Perfect Body” over a slew of skinny skinny models. The company quietly changed its ads after an onslaught of social media outrage. And, some 20,000 people will sign Charge.org petitions when they find out that Old Navy charges more money for items that come in plus sizes. (The retailer didn’t fully capitulate, but it did change plus size policies.)

Holliday, who started a viral #EffYourBeautyStandards online campaign, attributes her recent signing and burgeoning career to her dedicated social media following. “People aren’t used to seeing someone who is fat and happy,” she says, which could be why her 415,000 Instagram followers so eagerly await her posts.

“It’s not a trend, really — it’s happening,” Emme says. “It’s the tipping point.”

TIME celebrity

The World’s Obsession With Amal Isn’t About Her Accomplishments

Lawyer Amal Alamuddin Clooney attends the hearing in the case Perincek vs Switzerland, at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France, Jan. 28,2015.
Lawyer Amal Alamuddin Clooney attends the hearing in the case Perincek vs Switzerland, at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France, Jan. 28, 2015. Sandro Weltin/Council of Europe/EPA

Charlotte Alter covers lifestyle, crime, and breaking news for TIME in New York City. Her writing has also appeared in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

They're real, but the gushing isn't

Amal Clooney is at it again— doing something celebrities don’t usually do, and looking like a movie star while doing it.

This time, she’s arguing in the European Court of Human Rights against a Turkish politician who denied the existence of an Armenian genocide 100 years ago in which more than 1.5 million people were brutally murdered. That’s, like, sooo impressive… but who is she wearing?

When a reporter from The Telegraph asked her, she cheekily replied “Ede and Ravenscroft,” the legal robes maker that has been selling drab back judge costumes since 1689, the year Benjamin Franklin’s parents met.

Once she did that, the focus shifted from the history of the Armenian genocide to Amal’s sense of humor and fashion choices. The global reaction to her comments was proof that jig is up: it’s stop pretending you care about what Amal Clooney is doing, when you really just care about how she looks while doing it.

The public obsession with Amal Clooney has been outwardly focused on her professional accomplishments, and with good reason. She’s represented high-profile clients like Julian Assange and former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, fought for the Elgin Marbles to be returned to Greece, and worked to free three Al-Jazeera journalists imprisoned in Egypt. She’s done more in the last ten years than many lawyers do over their entire career.

It sounds great, and it is. But the gushing adoration in the media about her work is false appreciation that crumples under scrutiny. How many other human rights lawyers inspire anything close to Amal-mania? Look at Samira al-Nuaimy, the Iraqi human rights lawyer who was executed by ISIS last year. If the tabloid-buying American public so obsessed with human rights, why wasn’t she on the cover of InTouch?

MORE Lawyer Who Led Challenge of Uganda’s Anti-Gay Law: ‘Long, Long Way to Go’

Let’s face it: no matter how real Amal’s accomplishments are, the breathless celebration of her legal triumphs is just a thinly veiled infatuation with how she looks.

When placed in the glare of celebrity, Clooney’s binders of legal documents and folders of case material become accessories to her shiny hair and perfect manicure, instead of the other way around. What’s worse, there’s something grotesque about using serious work on behalf of genocide victims as a pretense for a fixation on her looks, her clothes, and her marriage to one of the world’s most eligible actors.

Amal’s beauty is the unspoken end of every sentence about her legal career, the sub-head to every headline about her human rights work. Even if the coverage is ostensibly focused on Turkish politics, or the Elgin marbles, or sexual violence in conflict zones, the substance get inevitably lost in the subliminal hum over what Amal’s wearing, how Amal’s hair looks, and the fact that Amal is married to George Clooney. It even happens when there’s nothing to report—the Armenian genocide case was overshadowed by Amal’s non-outfit (she was wearing essentially the same thing as all the other lawyers in the room).

It’s also a weird over-correction to the common sexist problem of focusing on women’s looks over their careers. Instead of focusing on the looks of an accomplished woman (like Kirsten Gillibrand), the media is loudly proclaiming how not-sexist they are by obsessively trumpeting Amal’s professional accomplishments, then mentioning her beauty as a super-conspicuous after-thought.

But discussing Amal Clooney’s human rights work in the same tone as Kim Kardashian’s workouts or Jennifer Lawrence’s pizza cravings isn’t just awkward— it’s bizarre. Imagine if other human rights activists were treated the same way. Next it’ll be “Watch Ban Ki-Moon Go to the Gym Without Makeup” or “Malala’s Celebrity Crush: REVEALED!”

MORE Malala Condemns the Killing of School Children in Peshawar

Some celebrities use their existing fame to shine a light on problems in the world, like Amal’s husband’s best friend’s wife Angelina Jolie, who recently wrote an op-ed in the New York Times demanding improved conditions in Syrian refugee camps. But that’s a different story, because Jolie came to activism after she got famous. She’s getting her picture taken in refugee camps and giving impassioned speeches at the U.N. precisely to direct those who are interested in her hair and clothes towards something more important.

But Amal’s just doing her job. Her work isn’t celebrity activism or a publicity stunt. Yet when it’s put in the context of celebrity fodder, Amal Clooney’s work on behalf of marginalized people gets reduced to just another thing a woman does while being beautiful.

So stop gushing. Stop with the headlines that trumpet Amal as a goddess for doing her job. Stop with the shock and awe that someone so beautiful could be so smart as well. Just let Amal keep doing her thing.

Read next: Amal Alamuddin Clooney and the Rise of the Trophy Husband

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TIME Mental Health/Psychology

Income Matters Most to People in This Age Group

TIME.com stock photos Money Dollar Bills
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Money may mean the most in midlife

Can money buy you happiness? It might depend on your stage of life, finds a new study in the journal Psychology and Aging. The link between life satisfaction and income is strongest in 30-50 year-olds, while it’s only weakly correlated in older people and young adults, the study shows.

Researchers looked at life satisfaction survey data from more than 40,000 people in Germany, the United Kingdom and Switzerland, taken over the course of many years. The results were consistent in all three regions.

People in the middle of their lives likely value income because of increased financial responsibilities, including the need to support a family, the study authors say. Young adults may place less value on income because of support from their parents, and older people are more likely to have resources outside of income like retirement savings, they explain.

Other research has suggested that money doesn’t do anything to make people happy, and, if it does, its influence is fairly subtle. But this study suggests that looking at the aggregate data without teasing out different age groups won’t necessarily provide the most relevant view.

“Our findings suggest that if money does buy happiness, it does so to different degrees for different people,” the study says.

TIME Sexual Assault

The Vanderbilt Rape Case Will Change the Way Victims Feel About the Courts

The decision sends the message that the criminal justice system does work for rape cases

On Wednesday, two former Vanderbilt University football stars were convicted by a Nashville jury of aggravated rape and aggravated sexual battery. Cory Batey and Brandon Vandenburg could serve decades behind bars for gang raping a fellow student in a dorm room in 2013. (Their argument that they were drunk and thus not in their right minds at the time of the attack was quickly dismissed by the court as a poor excuse for their violence.) The decision offers hope to victims of campus rape who, up until now, have shied away from reporting assaults to the police.

A recent study from the Justice Department found that 80% of campus rapes went unreported to the authorities (compared to a still-disheartening 67% in the general population). Victims of campus sexual assault have many reasons to choose a campus judiciary process over reporting the assault to the police. These victims are often in the position of living on the same campus as their assailant and thus forced to encounter them in the school cafeteria, in classrooms or in the library—places no student can avoid. Depending on the school’s policies, filing criminal charges against an assailant may not necessarily get him removed from campus, whereas a quicker, quieter campus judgment can. In minds of many victims, the fastest way to feel safe is by going to the dean not the police.

Victims’ advocates have said that some students believe faculty members will be more sympathetic to assault claims than the police. “If you’re a person of color or you’re queer, the process of going to the police also can be one that is not necessarily competent or great to deal with,” Caitlin Lowell of the Coalition Against Sexual Violence at Columbia University told TIME last year.

One reason students are deterred from reporting a rape to the police is that they think they will spend years going through the criminal judicial process reliving the agony of their attack only to be denied justice. A tiny fraction of accused rapists will ever serve a day in prison, according to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN).

But the criminal justice system can provide guarantees that campuses cannot. If the news cycle from the past year has taught us anything, it’s that universities—from Columbia University to Florida State University—are not equipped to adjudicate these cases. Students complain that evidence is not systematically collected, hearings are often held without attorneys present and administration officials and those designated to preside over these cases have posed inappropriate questions. In theory, our courts are the best way to ensure that rapists are removed from our streets, and the Vanderbilt case—along with the recent arrest of a Stanford University swimmer who allegedly raped an unconscious woman on campus grounds— suggests that in practice that may finally be the case. (The Stanford student was barred from campus after his arrest, highlighting the importance of police involvement.)

MORE:My Rapist Is Still on Campus': Sex Assault in the Ivy League

The evidence in the Vanderbilt case was hard to dismiss. Though the victim (whose anonymity is being preserved by TIME and other news outlets) said she did not remember what happened the night of her attack after she lost consciousness, other players testified that they saw Vanbenburg slap her buttocks and say he could not have sex because he was high on cocaine. They also said that Batey raped the woman and then urinated on her. (Two other players who have pled not guilty will be tried later.)

University surveillance videos of players carrying an unconscious woman through a dormitory and graphic images of the assault taken from players’ phones proved that the victim was unconscious and confirmed which players participated in the gang rape. There was no DNA evidence, but one player testified that Vandenburg—who can be heard laughing and encouraging the assault in a video shown in court—passed out condoms to the other players.

Most victims are not able to bring so much evidence to the court. And many victims would understandably worry that they wouldn’t be able to finish their degree while enduring this arduous process. (The victim in this case impressively did and is now pursuing a Ph.D. in neuroscience at another university.)

Assault survivors should take comfort in this small victory. “I want to remind other victims of sexual violence: You are not alone. You are not to blame,” the victim said in a statement that was read by Assistant District Attorney Jan Norman in a press conference.

Bringing rapists to justice is just one piece of fighting the campus rape epidemic. In the Vanderbilt case, police said that five other athletes saw the victim in distress and did nothing to intervene or report her attackers. Even if our criminal justice system were perfect, it could not stop rape from happening. That’s why the White House is currently promoting a bystander intervention educational campaign on campuses. Ultimately it’s up to students to watch out for one another.

Read Next: Rose Byrne on Frat Culture and How Bystanders Can Stop Sexual Assault

TIME

Watch Fox’s Megyn Kelly School Mike Huckabee Over ‘Trashy Women’ Comments

"We're not only swearing, we're drinking, we're smoking, we're having premarital sex"

After Mike Huckabee said that New York women were “trashy” for cursing in a professional setting, Megyn Kelly set him straight.

Huckabee said in a Jan. 23rd radio interview that he was shocked at the way professional New York women threw around f-bombs. “This would be considered totally inappropriate to say these things in front of a woman, and for a woman to say them in a professional setting, we would only assume that this is a very, as we would say in the South, that’s just trashy.”

The presidential hopeful said that there’s a “cultural divide” between people who live in the “bubbles” on the coast and the people who live in “the land of what I call god, guns, grits, and gravy,” which, incidentally, is also the title of his book. He goes off on a diatribe about the “culture of crude.”

Kelly listened politely to the former Arkansas governor before telling him what she really thought of his “culture of crude.”

“I do have news for you before I let you go,” Kelly said. “We are not only swearing, we’re drinking, we’re smoking, we’re having premarital sex with birth control before we go to work, and sometimes boss around a bunch of men.”

“Aw, I just don’t want to hear that!” Huckabee responded.

 

TIME universities

Dartmouth Bans Hard Alcohol on Campus For All

Dartmouth Advanced Placement
Students walk across the Dartmouth College campus green in Hanover, N.H., on March 12, 2012. The school is banning hard alcohol on campus. Jim Cole—AP

Fraternities need to reform or disband, says Dartmouth president

Dartmouth College plans to ban all hard alcohol on campus following a series of high-profile reports of sexual assaults at universities around the U.S.

Dartmouth President Philip Hanlon said on Thursday that all students, regardless of age, would be banned from consuming and possessing hard alcohol on campus, while warning the college’s fraternities that they would need to reform or disband.

(MORE: Dartmouth’s President on Sexual Assault Prevention and Bystander Intervention)

Several schools have taken similar steps to reform their alcohol policies since a Rolling Stone articlewas published about an alleged rape at a University of Virginia fraternity. While that story has since been discredited, Brown University announced this month that it would ban alcohol at its fraternities, Swarthmore College has banned hard alcohol from events on campus, and U-Va. has banned mixed drinks and punches at its fraternity parties.

(MORE: The Sexual Assault Crisis on American Campuses)

TIME celebrity

Kim and Kanye Working on Difficult Second Child

Celebrity Sightings In New York City - November 06, 2014
Kanye West and Kim Kardashian arrive to Soho House New York James Devaney—GC Images

The celebrity tells People she and Kanye West are "trying for another kid"

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West have unveiled their winter project — a younger sibling for baby North.

“We’ve really been trying for another kid,” Kardashian, 34, told People. More kids can’t come soon enough.”

The newlyweds had their first child, North, nineteen months ago.

This has been a busy 12 months for Kardashian. Not only did she break the internet, but Kardashian also got married, launched a mega-successful smartphone game, wrote a book (about selfies), and starred in a Super Bowl ad (also about selfies.)

Read more at People.

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