TIME celebrity

From Kim’s Butt to Angelina’s Lips: The Plastic Surgery Procedures Women Want

Valentino : Front Row  - Paris Fashion Week : Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2014-2015
Jacopo Raule—WireImage/Getty Images

According to data from a popular online cosmetic surgery community

Remember the woman who spent $30,000 to look like Kim Kardashian? Well, she’s certainly not the only person who has spent serious time and money t0 look like a celebrity — and Kim in particular. In fact, for women seeking cosmetic surgery, Kim’s butt is the most requested celebrity feature, according to data from RealSelf.com, an online community where users come together to discuss plastic surgery procedures.

To determine which celebrity features are most popular, RealSelf scanned all its content pages to see which names users are mentioning the most when inquiring about procedures. So in other words, this data is more anecdotal than scientific, says Alicia Nakamoto, vice president of community at RealSelf.

To get a derrière like Kim’s, most women opt for the the Brazilian Butt Lift, which is a procedure that takes fat from one part of the body (like the abdomen, thighs or arms) and transfers it to the buttocks. The average cost is $6,725.

After Kim, here are the other most popular celebrity mentions of 2014, along with the corresponding body part or procedure:

  • Beyoncé – butt
  • Madonna – face and hands (anti-aging)
  • Angelina Jolie – cheeks, lips
  • Rihanna – skin lightening
  • Jennifer Lawrence – nose
  • Jennifer Lopez – butt
  • Kate Middleton – nose, smile
  • Julia Roberts – lips, smile

Every once in a while, a key moment in pop culture will cause a spike in celebrity requests. When Maleficent hit theaters, for example, more women began inquiring about Angelina Jolie’s cheekbones. When Snooki was popular (remember those days?) and got some work done to her teeth, people began asking about getting theirs as white as hers. And when Krista from The Bachelorette underwent a post-natal “mommy makover,” a surge of women began expressing interest in the procedure as well.

But for the most part, the majority of people discussing plastic surgery on RealSelf don’t reference specific famous people at all.

“Ninety-nine percent of the people do not want to look like a celebrity,” Nakamoto says. “They just want to fix something very personal and go on with their lives feeling more confident with themselves.”

TIME celebrity

5 Celebrities Who Want to Tell You How to Live

Gravlax, swaddles, and much, much more

When Blake Lively launched her lifestyle brand, Preserve, on Monday, she went where many blondes have gone before. Gwyneth Paltrow and Jessica Alba already have established personal lifestyle websites, and Reese Witherspoon and Ellen DeGeneres have announced plans to launch in the next year. Here are some of the craziest suggestions for how to live like a celebrity:

(MORE: The Problem With Celebrities Who Tell You How to Live Well)

  • Gwyneth Paltrow

    Actress Gwyneth Paltrow attends the premiere of Roadside Attractions' 'Thanks For Sharing' at ArcLight Cinemas on September 16, 2013 in Hollywood, California. (
    Actress Gwyneth Paltrow on September 16, 2013 in Hollywood, California. ( Jason Merritt—Getty Images

    Gwyneth Paltrow is the Neil Armstrong of celebrity lifestyle websites: She made one small step for Goop, one giant leap for celeb-kind. Paltrow barely acts anymore, and instead spends most of her considerable energy turning Goop.com into a how-to guide for a perfect life, complete with recipes, resort recommendations and suggestions for the perfect white button-down shirt.

    Don’t miss out on this delicious “Beet-Cured Gravlax” salmon, which apparently “takes a couple of days but is as easy as sprinkling salt onto a piece of fish.” Never be seen with a pathetic top-heavy bouquet again, since here’s your guide to flower arrangements by vase. Here’s a $500 exclusive monogrammable l’americano longboard for your kids to destroy immediately. And here’s how to get divorced, Goop-style.

    Confused? We’ve got you covered with our Goop-to-English dictionary.

     

  • Jessica Alba

    Actress Jessica Alba at the 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards on January 13, 2013 in Beverly Hills, California. Jason Merritt—Getty Images

    Jessica Alba’s “The Honest Company” is the most mommyish of all the celebrity lifestyle blogs, and sells things like diaper rash cream and soothing bottom wash. This description of a 3-pack of Organic Swaddles decorated with hot air balloons says it all:

    “Lovingly wrap your little ones in our soft, organic cotton muslin swaddles…we designed this exclusive collection to inspire every little one to look ‘Up in the Air’ and imagine the endless possibilities of adventure and exploration.”

    Also, this explanation of a magic potion to keep your kid from getting sick:

    “Our Kid’s Immunity Boost is a premium botanical blend featuring Black Elderberry, Arabinogalactan & other natural extracts known to be effective at warding off the seasonal ickies! Our slightly sweet & lightly flavored powder is gentle on tummies & easy to sneak into your kid’s favorite food (yogurt, oatmeal, jelly sandwich, etc.), smoothie, or juice.”

    Sounds serene.

  • Blake Lively

    Blake Lively attends "12-12-12" a concert benefiting The Robin Hood Relief Fund to aid the victims of Hurricane Sandy presented by Clear Channel Media Entertainment, The Madison Square Garden Company and The Weinstein Company at Madison Square Garden on December 12, 2012 in New York City.
    Blake Lively on December 12, 2012 in New York City. Dimitrios Kambouris—Getty Images

    Blake Lively became the newest addition to the celebrity lifestyle pantheon with Preserve, which just launched Monday. In her editor’s note, she calls Preserve a “creative space” that “honors the future, while having a love affair with the past…” The rest of her note reads kind of like spoken-word poetry:

    I am hungry, though… not just for enchiladas.
    I’m hungry for experience.

    And then:

    There’s expensive stuff. Inexpensive stuff. And everything in between. But their value, is up to you. We may romanticize it, calling it treasure. What we’re really saying is, we see worth on every level.

    And here’s the Preserve philosophy on “intimacy:”

    We feel that in a world so hectic, preserving intimacy is the key to being present. The smoky scent of sandalwood burning on a wick, the “ahh” of a warm bath; the precious exposure of your husband’s cheeks after a clean shave; the warmth of chocolate melting on your palette; the glow of reminiscing with your grandmother; the feeling of building not only a table, but also memories, with your dad—these are the quiet moments that make life most precious.

    But what can you buy that will “preserve” the “the ‘ahh’ of a warm bath?” Oh, maybe this $92 oyster platter? Or this $132 paint splattered T-shirt that you’ve been trying to burn for years? Or this old-timey $1,000 traveler’s satchel that’s made especially for those with a “flair for the far-flung?”

    For all its preciousness, Preserve does have good intentions. It’s partnered with Covenant House, a nonprofit that supports trafficked and abused youth, and the company has promised to donate 5% of first-year purchases towards providing meals, blankets and warm clothing to at-risk young people.

  • Ellen DeGeneres

    TV personality Ellen DeGeneres arrives at the TCL Chinese Theatre for the premiere of Netflix's "Arrested Development" Season 4 held on April 29, 2013 in Hollywood, California.
    TV personality Ellen DeGeneres on April 29, 2013 in Hollywood, California. Jason Merritt—Getty Images

    Ellen announced earlier this month she’s starting her own lifestyle brand, which will focus on mid-price home decor items, clothing and pet toys. ““My goal is that people can have a beautiful house, a really comfortable house, without only being able to afford [very expensive] things,” she told Womens Wear Daily. The brand, set to be called E.D., is expected to launch later this year.

  • Reese Witherspoon

    Actress Reese Witherspoon attends the Great American Songbook event honoring Bryan Lourd at Alice Tully Hall on February 10, 2014 in New York City.
    Actress Reese Witherspoon at Alice Tully Hall on February 10, 2014 in New York City. Theo Wargo—Getty Images

    Reese Witherspoon’s unnamed lifestyle brand is set to launch in 2015, but she’s already hired C. Wonder president Andrea Hyde for her “omnichannel venture.” Witherspoon hasn’t announced much about what her lifestyle brand might include, except to hint that it would be heavily influenced by her Southern roots.

TIME celebrity

The Problem With Celebrities Who Tell You How to Live Well

Blake Lively arrives for the screening of the film "Captives" at the 67th edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, on May 16, 201.
Blake Lively arrives for the screening of the film "Captives" at the 67th edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, on May 16, 201. Valery Hache—AFP/Getty Images

Health is the new wealth: Just ask Blake, Gwyneth, Jessica and Ellen

Somewhere in Greenwich Village, it’s reported that Leonardo Di Caprio’s apartment lighting is synching up with his circadian rhythms. At least that’s one of the features his health-centric building advertises. On a recent visit to the Delos Living loft-style apartments in New York City, which are designed with posture-supportive flooring and ultraviolet lights to sterilize airborne microbes, I got a sneak peak into the lifestyles of the rich and health conscious. As the elevator doors opened, Deepak Chopra, prominent alternative medicine practitioner, stepped out in a t-shirt. He too, lives in the building currently offering a penthouse for $50 million.

(MORE: 5 Celebrities Who Want to Tell You How to Live)

If you’re willing to pay the price, you can not only afford a luxury apartment with cleaner air, but a yoga teacher who makes house calls, a fitness concierge who makes sure you get to workouts on time, healthy meals delivered to your doorstep. Is the good life still getting you down? If you can foot a $1818 bill, you can escape to Sri Lanka for a two-week wellness vacation.

Gone are the days of flaunting lavish apartments and cars for the MTV “Cribs” camera crews, instead, we see Instagram posts of up to $235 rejuvenating skin care products and celebrity trainers. Exit opulent mansions, enter evidence of impeccable physical health.

Wellness is the new wealth. And we all want some of that glow. Steady growth of 7.2% per year for the health and wellness market is expected to continue, with global sales hitting a record high of $1 trillion by 2017. Wellness tourism—travel that promotes health through physical and spiritual activities from meditation retreats to weight loss spas–is a $439 billion industry worldwide.

And who better to pander to our desires for the latest and greatest in self improvement than today’s batch of celebrities who no longer simply sell us a new vodka, perfume, or eye shadow, but instead offer how-to guides using their own lives displayed via perfectly curated lifestyle blogs.

The queen of selling us the good life is of course, actress Gwyneth Paltrow, whose personal blog, Goop, provides recipes for her white pear kimchi, or the chai gingerbread shake in her winter cleanse. She’s even pushing the trendy new way to end a marriage.

Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres recently announced that she will be launching, E.D., her new lifestyle brand in late October/early November. Though she remained tight lipped about the details to WWD, she will reportedly offer everything from home décor to fashion. Jessica Alba even has her own brand of organic baby products. And this week, actress Blake Lively joined the crowd with the launch of her lifestyle brand, Preserve. The site, which highlights trends in food, style and wellness, sells everything from curry ketchup to earrings. In her editor’s letter Lively writes: “I’m no editor, no artisan, no expert. And certainly no arbiter of what you should buy, wear. Eat.” And yet…

This new wave of celebrities are no longer just actresses and performers, they’re brands, and they’re selling us a blueprint for the most intimate aspects of life. Martha Stewart built her empire by showing women how to create cute crafts and put together the perfect 4th of July spread, but she never provided a detailed outline of her own day-to-day activities, like what products she uses and her latest workout. Oprah got a lot closer, with her former TV show and O magazine, flagging inspiring stories and offering recommendations on what women should read how to get their to do lists done.

And in 2014, it’s clear that wellness is becoming something worth lusting over as much as the perfect table setting, and in many cases, it’s a luxury item. Arianna Huffington’s book Thrive: The Third Metric to Redefining Success and Creating a Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder has sold about 1.6 million copies promoting the idea that true success means paying heed to well being, taking meditation breaks at work and getting more sleep.

Hotels like the W and Westin are catering to the growing interest among guests to be healthy. Westin hotel rooms are part hotel room, part mini-gym with a treadmill or stationary bike, dumbbells, fitness DVDs, resistance bands and stability balls built into individual rooms. In May, the W launched a fitness program with in-room exercise videos. Renowned hospital, the Cleveland Clinic, even has a clinic that specifically treats big-name business executives (Oprah is a patient).

But how easy is it to adopt the lifestyles of the rich and extremely well? Just ask Rachel Bertsche, author of the new book, “Jennifer, Gwyneth, & Me.” She spent eight months trying to imitate the lives of celebrities like Jennifer Aniston, Jessica Alba and Gwyneth Paltrow following their eating, exercise and marriage philosophies for a month each. “There is absolutely a rush when you’re feeling like you’re living that glamorous lifestyle,” she says. “I think Gwyneth Paltrow has made a business of saying ‘here is my fabulous life’ and suggesting things that are attainable. But stars are not just like us, and we are not just like them.” By the end of Bertsche’s chapter on Gwyneth she sounds like she’s close to tears and starvation.

Meanwhile, one third of the general populace is still obese, and the majority of us are not getting adequate exercise nor do enough of us have regular access to fresh food, raw, macrobiotic or otherwise. Americans work long hours—among the longest in the industrailized world—and we’re stressed out. Forty-three percent of U,S. adults report stress has kept them awake at night. But often times it’s easier to simply click through Gwyneth’s recipes for appetizers like beet-cured gravlax than take that time and money to make ourselves better based on her recommendations. It’s sort of like window shopping high-luxury stores. The reality is that look and admire is all many of us can do.

Making health and wellness a luxury that only a select few can afford isn’t helpful, especially since there are so many simple ways to achieve better health by opting for healthier food (even in the frozen aisle) and being more physically active (even just a walk can help). If a juice cleanse is really part of a simple healthy lifestyle (which I will argue until I am blue in the face that it’s not) then why does a one-day package cost $65? Making health “trendy” has its benefits, surely we’ve seen enough of celebrities touting late night boozing and drug use. But when a market emerges that transforms wellness into something only attainable for the 1%, health disparities become ever more visible, and we lose sight of what it means to really be “well.”

 

TIME Travel

50 Best Apps and Websites for Travelers

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Tom Merton—Caiaimage/Getty Images

There's an app for just about everything, from making the most of an extended flight delay to tapping into local culture. Here are the best digital tools for travelers, all tested by Travel +Leisure's tech correspondent

Everyone has an airport horror story. But you can make the most of a bad situation with apps likeFlight+, which will keep you abreast of the latest delays and gate changes. And if you need a shower, unlimited Wi-Fi, or a work space during your extended layover, LoungeBuddy will alert you as to which free and pay-as-you-go lounges are available.

These are just two of the digital tools that can improve your experience on the road—among the 100,000-plus travel apps on the market. No need to feel overwhelmed, though. We spent the past year travel-testing apps and websites, everywhere from airplanes and buses to airport lounges, cars, and remote camping sites across the globe. The resulting list represents the best of the best, with runners-up in categories where the competition is fierce.

Find Rock-Bottom Fares: Adioso

Don’t know where you want to go? This flexible search tool lets you browse airfares by continent, country, region, or type of trip (say, adventure) to find deals that fill the bill. The site also delivers inspiration in the form of “Wanderlists,” which show you what it might cost to get to the best cities for art lovers (London; Miami) or top beach destinations (St. Bart’s; Hawaii), among other categories. Free; adioso.com.

T+L Tip: You can shop Adioso with specific dates in mind, though you can also look for departures “any Friday” or “sometime this fall.”

Pick a Pain-Free Flight: Routehappy

Cheap tickets can come with high hassle factors (impossibly short connections; multiple stops). Enter Routehappy, which uses “Happiness” scores to prioritize itineraries that are shorter, have the simplest layover logistics, and the best prices. Its user-friendly design makes it easy to see the benefits of each route and book your favorite in just a few taps. Free; routehappy.com.

Track Fares: Yapta

Not only does this scrappy site watch your airfares and alert you when the price drops but it also monitors your ticket (or hotel) after you’ve booked, up to the day you depart. Should it fall further, Yapta automatically helps you secure any rebates you’re eligible for; the average user saves $335 annually. Free; yapta.com.

Runner-up: Trip Watcher

Compare Vacation Packages: Kayak

The flight aggregator you know and love has a new feather in its cap: the package search now lets you know whether bundled deals for airfare and hotels are actually more affordable than the sum of their parts. Make reservations directly on Kayak, or click through to third-party providers­; the site that offers the best price will be shown front and center. Free; kayak.com.

T+L Tip: Kayak’s app includes loads of valuable extras, such as an itinerary manager, a flight tracker, and a currency converter.

Runners-up: Momondo, GetGoing

Don’t End Up in a Bad Seat: SeatGuru

News flash: you don’t have to pay for a costly upgrade to get extra legroom on your next flight. SeatGuru’s search tool lets you look for seats with maximum pitch, power outlets, in-flight entertainment, and Wi-Fi. Want to shop like a pro? Check the site’s plane charts before booking your ticket to make sure you’re not sacrificing precious inches for a slightly lower fare. Free; seatguru.com.

T+L Tip: If the best spots on the plane are unavailable, try Seat Alerts by ExpertFlyer(free; expertflyer.com). It e-mails you when better options open up on your scheduled departure.

READ THE FULL LIST HERE

By Tom Samiljan

More from Travel + Leisure:

TIME Body Image

Harvard Women’s Rugby Team Wants You to Know Strength Is Beautiful

Lydia Burns and Shelby Lin

"Ripped," "so strong" and "fearless"

Amid movies and advertisements that promote stick-thin women, and even fitness magazines that focus on “lean” and “toned” bodies, the Harvard women’s rugby team has an important message: strength is beautiful.

The team staged a photo shoot in which they all wore matching sports bras and spandex and wrote empowering messages on each other’s bodies. “Powerful,” reads one girl’s knuckles. “Ripped,” says another’s bicep, and “Beautiful & Fierce!” announces another girl’s stomach.

“I think the notion of strength being beautiful is so overlooked in our society because strength is historically associated with masculinity, and women are taught that they must be strictly feminine to be beautiful,” player Helen Clark told TODAY.com.

The photos were published in June along with an essay in the Harvard Political Review, and have gone viral in recent weeks.

“We hope seeing our photos will encourage women to go out and find a space like rugby where their bodies are celebrated for their inherent strength and power,” Clark said, “Rather than just for how they look in a bikini.”

TIME career

Why It’s Hard for Women to Promote Other Women

Digital Vision—Getty Images

Promoting diversity in the workplace could be detrimental to your career, according to a new study that will be presented at the Academy of Management’s annual meeting in August.

The study wants to figure out why white men currently hold 85% of leadership positions at Fortune 500 companies.

Researchers at the University of Colorado found that women and non-whites who advocate hiring their counterparts are penalized in their performance reviews. Those who promote women and non-whites fall victim to negative stereotypes outlined in the study: Women are perceived as “less warm” while non-white are seen as “less competent.”

The researchers surveyed 362 executives ranging from the banking sector to consumer products and food. Those in the upper 15% for dedication to diversity averaged a performance rating of 3.76 on a scale from one to five, with five as the highest score. However, a decline in promoting diversity led to an increased performance rating.

Diversity promotion had the opposite effect for white men, who receive higher ratings when promoting diversity in the workplace. Despite this, minorities and women were given higher performance ratings when they advocated hiring a white man.

“People are perceived as selfish when they advocate for someone who looks like them, unless they’re a white man,” David Hekman, an author of the study, told the Wall Street Journal.

One reason the “glass ceiling”(as the University of Colorado researchers phrase it) exists for women and non-whites in the corporate world is because any promotion of diversity hinders their own performance ratings. The resulting social construction proves to be one that is difficult to overcome.

TIME career

Here’s a Really Original Way to Quit a Soul-Crushing Job

A young lawyer finally gets up the courage to quit her job and follow her creative passion--cartooning. Here's how she did it.

It’s a familiar story: the graduate who takes the safe route after college – going along an established career path to a comfortable job, and maybe letting some former passions fall by the wayside. One day they wake up and realize that they never play the guitar any more, or they don’t write as much as they used to, and suddenly their job doesn’t seem so fulfilling.

What isn’t so familiar is when people actually do something about their regrets. Catherine, a New York lawyer in her early 30′s, knew she needed to make a change. So she quit her job at a high-powered law firm to pursue art- and documented it all in cartoons.

Laywer Cartoons Departure Memo
“Catherine”—departurememo.com

Catherine’s website departurememo.com is a cartoon strip that depicts her battle—spanning across multiple years and two cities—to keep her passion for painting alive in the world of finance law, and her eventual decision to pursue that passion full-time. (Catherine chose not to reveal her full name to avoid harming her past employer’s reputation.)

“Art is something that I’ve always enjoyed doing,” Catherine tells TIME. “It’s enough of a constant throughout my life that I’ve really gotten to thinking in the past few years that maybe this is something more than what I do when I have free time.”

Her website also documents that her entry into the legal world was less than enthusiastic. “Like many of my friends and classmates and colleagues, I had gone to law school fairly aimlessly in my mid-20s with no real plan other than the well-beaten path: do appreciably (if not well), Biglaw, pay off loans, then see where the cards fell,” departurememo.com reads.

Lawyer Cartoons Departure Memo
“Catherine”—departurememo.com

However, as her illustrated memo shows, the “well-beaten path” didn’t suit Catherine very well, and the time she had to dedicate to her life-long passion for art became minimal. “People here are really talented. Unfortunately, for many people, the talents from our past lives now merely take the form of s**t we hang on our walls. It’s the ‘used to’ syndrome,” she writes on her website.

This problem led to her decision to make a career change, and the comic seemed the most fitting way to explain it. “I had a few exchanges that I’ve memorialized in the memo that seemed to me to be too funny, or I just felt that they would work really well in a kind of comic format,” Catherine says. “I felt that it would be relatable. I wanted to do something funny and memorable that the people would enjoy.”

Lawyer Cartoons Departure Memo
“Catherine”—departurememo.com

She sent it to a couple dozen of her co-workers and hoped word of mouth would spread the cartoon around her office. The results were more successful than she’d anticipated. The website was even featured in Yahoo and the legal blog “Above the Law.” She says, “Apparently it struck a chord with a lot of people. I’m just really impressed, really amazed at the reception it got, how far and wide it’s been passed around.”

Catherine’s memo is not the first creative representation for quitting a job. Last September, 25-year-old Marina Shifrin filmed a dance video to Kanye West’s “Gone” to explain her decision to quit her animation job. “For almost two years I’ve sacrificed my relationships, time and energy for this job,” Shifrin wrote in the video.

“Everyone’s had to cancel plans, been pushed into projects that are a mismatch for their interests, worked terrible hours, and so forth,” Catherine said. “Probably quite a few people have wished they could say what was really on their mind when they left, but few do.”

For those like Shifrin who might find the cartoon all too relatable, Catherine has some advice. “I think that there is so much talent out there, and people should absolutely cultivate their talents…and spend time supporting other artists and creative people,” she says. “Everyone can make something, but if we don’t spend time supporting one another, then it’s kind of a dead end for everyone.”

Catherine will find her own creative support community in a month-long artists’ residency program before returning to San Francisco, where she has settled. “Basically the plan there is to clear my head and paint, really not to have to worry about too much else other than figuring out with paintbrushes and paint what I have to say at this point,” she says. “And I’m really open to whatever may come.”

Lawyer Cartoons Departure Memo
“Catherine”—departurememo.com

 

TIME advice

What Is The Most Productive Thing I Can Do When I Am Bored?

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Hype Photography—Getty Images

Answer by Visakan Veerasamy, an employee of ReferalCandy and writer for Poached Magazine, for Quora.

I’ve noticed that everything that’s been stated involves doing something or trying something or focusing on something.

I propose elimination. See how much you can cut away from your life. Via negativa.

Eliminate needless clutter from your desk.

Eliminate needless noisemakers from your social media. (Eliminate needless social media channels altogether.)

Eliminate needless apps from your phone.

Eliminate needless blogs from your RSS feed.

Eliminate needless books from your shelves.

I think of this as an ‘Odyssean’ activity.

Odysseus guarded himself against temptation by the Sirens by getting his men to tie him to the mast of his ship.

Our willpower is limited.

In moments of clarity (or boredom, when we have enough energy to do simple tasks but not major ones), it helps if we tie ourselves to our masts by eliminating distractions.

Cut away anything that isn’t relevant to what you want to achieve in life. Do it now, while you can, and you’ll thank yourself for it later when you’d have been otherwise distracted.

Of course, you never want to get too extreme with this, because there is always value outside of what you’ve set up for yourself. That random annoying person on Facebook might just be the spouse of your dreams. It’s pretty unlikely, though.

Trust your own judgement and get rid of what you know, with reasonable certainty, to be a waste of your time.

That leaves you with only what matters. Now that’s productive.

This question originally appeared on Quora:What is the most productive thing I can do when I’m bored? More questions:

TIME celebrities

Beyoncé Just Posted the Ultimate Feminist Photo

She woke up like this

Well, obviously Beyoncé can do it. The 17-time Grammy winner posted a photo to Instagram Tuesday that mirrors the famous Rosie the Riveter poster, a cultural icon that recognizes the contributions made by women during World War II. Beyonce, a self-described “modern-day feminist,” incorporated ideas often symbolized by Rosie in her most recent album. The photo racked up more than 300,000 likes within half an hour.

Beyoncé is currently on the road with husband Jay Z for their joint “On the Run” tour.

TIME royals

120 Years Of Royal Infants On Camera

They may be born to greatness, but here's photographic proof that even royals start small.

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