TIME

Every Execution in U.S. History in a Single Chart

See the rise and fall of methods of capital punishment since 1700—from hanging to burning to lethal injection, including Tuesday's botched execution in Oklahoma

Mouse over or tap a bar in the chart to see the figures for that year.

A botched lethal injection in Oklahoma Tuesday night has once again thrown the prevailing method of execution in the United States into turmoil.

How states have executed prisoners has changed over time. More than half of the 15,717 executions in U.S. history have been by hanging. Today, lethal injection has replaced electrocution as the dominant method of capital punishment in the United States. Tuesday’s failure in Oklahoma is not the first time the method has failed to quickly kill a convict. (There were no executions from 1967 to 1977. They resumed following a Supreme Court ruling.)

Data for historical executions through 1976 are derived from research conducted by M. Watt Espy and John Ortiz Smykla. Data since the end of the hiatus come from the Death Penalty Information Center.

Emily Maltby and Lon Tweeten contributing reporting to this story. The source code for this project is available on Time’s GitHub page.

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