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This Week in Health: How to Make Yourself Love Exercise

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What kind of exercise is best for your health? The kind you enjoy doing—even if it's easy, found an encouraging new study. Here's what else caught our attention in health news this week. (Sign up for the TIME Health newsletter for more.)

You Asked: Is intense exercise better for your health?

No surprise here: A tough, sweaty workout is great for you. But easy exercise may actually offer more bang for your burn.

Washing hands in cold water works as well as hot against germs

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A new study clears up a long-standing myth about kitchen and bathroom hygiene: that the water must be hot to work.

A MRSA infection cost me $300,000—and nearly killed me

Chris Linaman survived a severe infection of the bacteria MRSA, which occurs most frequently in healthcare settings. This is his story.

How to make yourself love exercise

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Does exercise turn you off? A simple shift in mindset can make you happier and healthier, experts say.

How dads treat their daughters differently than sons

Fathers use different language and behaviors when parenting daughters than sons, new research shows.

Want to lose weight? You should stop counting calories

healthiest foods, health food, diet, nutrition, time.com stock, salmon, fish, protein Danny Kim for TIME  

No more meal math: Eating high-quality foods—including plenty of fat—is the new golden rule of healthy eating.

Household chemicals can harm thyroid function in young girls

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A new study adds to warnings about exposure of phthalates, which are found in household items including shampoos, perfumes, nail polish, plastic toys, house building materials and more.

Teens and older women are delaying motherhood

The teen birth rate hits a historic low, while the rate of older moms rises, according to new government data.

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