TIME Diet/Nutrition

Five Foods That Taste Better in September Than They Will All Year

Here's what should be on your grocery list this month

Never know what’s growing now? Let’s take it one month at a time, with TIME‘s Foods That Taste Better Now Than They Will All Year.

As summer draws to a close, you might think your best days of produce are behind you. But there are plenty of fruits and vegetables to fall for in September. We asked Joan Casanova, spokesperson for Bonnie Plants, what early-fall items are worth watching.

Swiss chard: This deep green veggie with colorful stems means it’s both beautiful and nutritious, says Casanova. Swiss chard is one vegetable that tolerates both cool temperatures and the heat, so you will see tasty varieties in September.

Rutabaga: A fall favorite, this root vegetable can be chunked or mashed, similar to potatoes. “It ripens best in cool autumn weather, taking on its characteristic mild, rich flavor after fall frosts descend on the garden,” says Casanova.

Lettuce: While lettuce is known for growing fast in full sun, Casanova says it is one of few vegetables that also does well in the shade. Home gardeners can grow lettuce in a small space, too.

Turnip leaves: These greens are extremely easy to grow in the fall, when nights become longer and cooler turnip greens get crisper and sweeter, says Casanova.

Leeks: Leeks are sweet, mild and gentle on the digestive system, Casanova says. They don’t produce bulbs like onions do, but they “stash their flavor in thick, juicy stems that look like huge scallions.”

TIME viral

This Boy Wrote an Adorable Apology Note to the Library for Ripping a Page

He felt bad for other kids who may want to read the book

An 8-year-old boy wrote an adorable apology note to the Toronto Public Library for accidentally ripping a page in an Asterix comic book.

The letter, written by Jackson Dowler, reads: “I am sorry that a page ripped when it fell out of my bed when I fell asleep reading it. It won’t happen again. I’m sorry. From Jackson.”

The library shared the letter on social media, and it had over 4,600 likes on Facebook and over 1,000 shares by Monday evening.

It was the widespread social media fervor over the letter that ultimately identified Dowler as the author of the letter, which was taped to the comic book in the overnight drop box addressed “Library.” One individual touched by Dowler’s letter shipped him some Asterix comics.

“We tried to tape it, but I wrote the note so I could tell the library it was ripped so they could fix it better,” Jackson told PEOPLE. “Other kids who want to read it don’t want to be missing a page. It was my dad’s favorite book and it’s mine too. It’s full of adventure!”

[People]

TIME Canada

Canadians Are Cutting $20 Bills in Half to Make Two $10s

Canadian 20 dollar bill
Chris Wattie—Reuters The new Canadian 20 dollar bill made of polymer is displayed at the Bank of Canada in Ottawa on May 2, 2012.

People in Canada are cutting $20 and $20 bills in half and using them as new currency.

According to CBC News, people in Quebec’s Gaspé region are cutting bills like $20 and $10 and using them for half the amount.

They are calling it a new currency by the name, “demi.” Local stores and residents have starting using and accepting them, with half a $20 bill worth $10.

The trend is not illegal, but the Bank of Canada is frowning on the practice.

“The Bank of Canada feels that writing and markings on bank notes or mutilating them [is] inappropriate as they are a symbol of our country and a source of national pride,” Bank of Canada spokeswoman Josianne Ménard said in a statement to CBC News.

[CBC News]

TIME Diet/Nutrition

McDonalds is Making a Big Change to the McMuffin

Egg McMuffin McDonald's
Mike Blake—Reuters An Egg McMuffin meal is pictured at a McDonald's restaurant in Encinitas, Calif. on Aug. 13, 2015.

The McMuffin will soon be made with real butter

McDonald’s is going to make McMuffins with real butter.

Instead of using liquid margarine, CNBC reports that McDonald’s is changing how it makes its biscuits, English muffins and bagels and is transitioning to using the real stuff.

Some stores are already advertising the change.

According to CNBC, one sign at a Manhattan McDonald’s location said: “We’re proud to cook breakfast items on the grill with real butter and we toast our English Muffins, biscuits and bagels with real butter too.”

McDonald’s has not responded to requests for confirmation or comment.

It was unclear how long the chain has been using real butter on its breakfast items.

[CNBC]

TIME Research

Your Kids Should Know About the Dangers of Drinking By Age 10, Doctors Say

504494219
Getty Images

Kids should know about the dangers of alcohol before their first sip

Health care professionals should be talking to children about the risks of alcoholic drinks when they are as young as nine, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

“Surveys indicate that children start to think positively about alcohol between ages 9 and 13 years,” the AAP authors write in the report. “The more young people are exposed to alcohol advertising and marketing, the more likely they are to drink, and if they are already drinking, this exposure leads them to drink more. Therefore, it is very important to start talking to children about the dangers of drinking as early as 9 years of age.”

In the United States, alcohol is the substance most commonly abused by kids and adolescents. The new report says that 21% of young people say they had more than a sip of an alcoholic beverage before they were 13 years old, and 79% have tried alcoholic drinks by the time they were seniors in high school.

The study also found that 80% of adolescents say their parents are the biggest influence on whether they drink or not, which suggests parents have a role as well. “We must approach drinking in children, particularly binge drinking, differently than we do in adults,” said co author and pediatrician Dr. Lorena Siqueira, a member of the AAP Committee on Substance Abuse. “Given their lack of experience with alcohol and smaller bodies, children and adolescents can have serious consequences — including death — with their first episode of binge drinking.”

Other research reviewed by the AAP committee suggested that continued use of alcohol at a young age can hinder brain development, lead to alcohol-induced brain damage, and increase the risk of substance use problems later on. The AAP says every pediatrician should screen their adolescent patients for alcohol use during appointments and offer preventative messaging.

The report authors focused specifically on the risks of binge drinking, which is classified as three or more drinks in a two-hour period for girls between ages nine and 17. For boys it’s three or more drinks in two hours between age 9 to 13, four or more drinks for boys ages 14 to 15, and five or more drinks for boys ages 16 to 17. The authors note that drinking rates increase in high school with 36 to 50% of high school students drinking and 28% to 60% binge drinking.

TIME weather

See Astronaut’s Photo of Hurricane Jimena From Space

Hurricane Jimena Space Station Kjell Lindgren
Kjell Lindgren—NASA A view of hurricane Jimena taken from the International Space Station and posted to Twitter by NASA Astronaut Kjell Lindgren on Aug. 30, 2015.

NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren captured this image of Hurricane Jimena from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on Sunday.

Jimena is a Category 4 hurricane that’s located more than 1,330 miles east of Hilo, Hawaii. Weather experts predict it will remain a Category 3 hurricane or greater through Tuesday. According to The Weather Channel, on Saturday and Sunday Jimena was one of three Category 4 hurricanes in the Pacific, along with hurricanes Kilo and Ignacio. Such a concentration of storms is rare.

TIME History

Menu From Titanic’s Last Lunch Is Going to Auction

Titanic Money Boat Artifacts
Lion Heart Autographs/AP Titanic's last lunch menu.

It could bring in as much as $70,000

A menu of the last lunch offered on the Titanic, which was saved by a passenger on a rescue boat, is going to auction, where it is expected to bring in $50,000 to $70,000.

The menu, which was saved by passenger Abraham Lincoln Salomon, listed items including corned beef and dumplings, the Associated Press reports. The menu is signed on the back by another passenger named Isaac Gerald Frauenthal. It’s believed the two first-class men had lunch together on that day.

Salomon was on a lifeboat that was known as the “Money Boat” in the press, based on allegations that the passengers bribed crew members to row away to safety rather than go back and save others.

On Sept. 30, auctioneer Lion Heart Autographs is offering the menu and other artifacts from the lifeboat. The objects being auctioned are from the son of a man who was given them by a direct descendent of one of the survivors.

[AP]

TIME Health Care

Physicians Avoid Conversations About Religion in the ICU

TIME.com stock photos Health First Aid Kit Gloves
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Even though it's important to patients and their families

Religion and spirituality are not common topics of discussion in intensive care units (ICUs), and doctors often go out of their way to avoid them—even though religion is often very important to patients and their medical surrogates during end-of-life care, a new study shows.

In the study, published Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers listened to audio recordings of 249 meetings between surrogates of critically ill patients and health care professionals in 13 different ICUs across the country. The goal was to investigate the religious or spiritual content in these talks. The researchers found that although religion was considered important to 77.6% of the surrogates (a surrogate is a family member or another person responsible for making medical decisions for a patient), conversations about religious and spiritual topics occurred in less than 20% of the goals-of-care conversations. Health care professionals rarely “explored the patient’s or family’s religious or spiritual ideas.”

When conversations about spirituality did occur in some of these end-of-life care conversations, the researchers found that 65% of the time the topic was initiated by the surrogate. Health care professionals raised the issue of spirituality only 5.6% of the time.

The types of religious conversations surrogates would bring up fell into categories such as: referencing their religious or spiritual beliefs, having the notion that the physician is God’s tool to aid in the healing of their loved one, and the idea that the end of life would be a new beginning. For example, surrogates said things like, “All I can do is pray for her to continue to get better and maybe one o’ these days, she can walk outta here.” Or, “I’m very, very optimistic because I know our faith is strong.”

The most common response among health care providers when a surrogate brought up religion or spirituality was to change the subject. In only eight conferences did a health care professional try to understand the beliefs of the surrogate by doing things like asking about the patient’s religious beliefs. “Our findings suggest that religious considerations—viewed as important to a large proportion of Americans—are often absent from end-of-life conversations,” the authors wrote. “This may signal a need for changes in health care delivery in ICUs.”

The study authors concluded that one potential solution would be to “redesign” health care processes so that spiritual care providers were a larger part of end-of-life care discussions for patients who value spirituality and religion.

In a corresponding editorial, health care professionals who were not involved in the study wrote: “Although we health care professionals struggle to connect spirituality and medicine as evidenced by the many and mounting articles that refute or explicate their connection, our patients and families typically do not struggle. For most, thoughts of what is most sacred, of what transcends the finitude of human life, come flooding in the moment the physician shares the news of the serious illness or the telephone call comes urging the listener to the bedside of a critically ill loved one.”

The new study suggests that religion and spirituality may be a conversation that people want to have at the end of life, and they are not getting it from their health care providers. Finding a solution for this discrepancy could be in patients’ and health care professionals’ best interest, the editorial said.
TIME Courts

University of Texas Removes Jefferson Davis Statue

Jefferson Davis - Univesity of Texas
Eric Gay—AP A statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis is moved from it's location in front of the school's main tower the University of Texas campus onAug. 30, 2015, in Austin.

The UT student body had voted for the statue to be removed

The University of Texas at Austin removed a statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis on Sunday.

The move happened days after an appeal by a Confederate supporter group was rejected by a state district judge. The statue of Davis is expected to be placed in UT’s Briscoe Center for American History in about 18 months.

In March the UT student body had voted for the statue to be removed from its prominent spot on campus. The Sons of Confederate Veterans had sued to prevent UT from moving the statue, but lost.

As the AP notes, Confederate symbols nationwide have been a target of criticism in the aftermath of the mass shooting at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. The statue of Davis at UT was criticized as a symbol of racism.

TIME celebrities

Hulk Hogan Apologizes for Racist Comments

Terry Bollea, Hulk Hogan,
Chris O'Meara—AP

The wrestler said racial slurs were thrown around casually where he grew up

An emotional Hulk Hogan apologized to fans Monday on Good Morning America for racist comments he made that were caught on tape.

The wrestler addressed his use of racial slurs in a recording that was recently released, resulting in Hogan’s removal from the WWE’s Hall of Fame. According to Yahoo, it’s believed that the tape was recorded between 2006 and 2007.

Hogan told GMA, “I’m not a racist, I never should have said what I said. It was wrong. I’m embarrassed by it.” Hogan said he grew up in a rough neighborhood where the N-word was “thrown around like it was nothing.” He said it was “very fair” to say that he inherited a racial bias. He asked his fans for forgiveness.

He added that the aftermath of the leak was very troubling for him: “I was to the point where I wanted to kill myself,” he said.

“Just because a person makes a mistake, just don’t throw them away. You don’t throw good people away,” said Hogan. “People get better every day.”

Your browser is out of date. Please update your browser at http://update.microsoft.com