TIME animals

Rabbits Are Disabling Cars at Denver Airport

Rabbits are chewing up wires under parked cars

Cars parked at the Denver International Airport are under siege by a bunch of furry menaces.

Rabbits from the surrounding prairie lands are hopping into the parking lot and chewing up wiring under cars, sometimes causing thousands of dollars in damage. The U.S. Agriculture Department’s Wildlife Services in Denver have been removing around 100 rabbits every month from the area, but the issue continues to persist, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Some believe the rabbits are seeking shelter under the cars for warmth. The airport is reportedly trying new solutions like adding additional fencing and perches for hawks.

[L.A. Times]

 

TIME Soccer

Women’s World Cup Breaks Ratings Record

United States womens world cup
Darryl Dyck—AP The United States Women's National Team celebrates with the trophy after they defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women's World Cup soccer championship in Vancouver on July 5, 2015.

Sunday's match reportedly garnered more U.S. viewers than any other soccer match in TV history

The United States’ Women’s World Cup win on Sunday broke a ratings record, garnering more viewers than any other soccer match in television history, according to broadcaster Fox Sports.

“It is the highest metered market rating ever for a soccer game in the U.S. on a single network,” Fox Sports wrote in an official announcement of the ratings triumph.

Data from Nielsen shows that game scored a 15.2 household rating for Fox, more than double the 6.1 rating for the U.S. semifinal win against Germany on June 30.

TIME Internet

More Than 160,000 Sign Petition for Reddit Chief’s Ouster

Closing Arguments Made In The Discrimination Case Pao v. Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers LLC
Getty Images

Signatures add to the backlash over the removal of a popular employeee

An online petition calling for Reddit interim CEO Ellen Pao to step down has gained more 160,000 signatures.

While the petition was started weeks ago, it’s gained significant traction after a popular employee, Victoria Taylor, who was Reddit’s director of talent and a facilitator of the Ask Me Anything feature, was removed from her position. The news resulted in the shut down of several popular message boards in protest. “I want to apologize to our community…” Pao told TIME last week. “We handled the transition in a way that caused some disruption, and we should have done a better job.”

The petition argues that when Pao stepped in as Reddit’s interim chief, “Reddit entered into a new age of censorship.”

Read next: Reddit’s Ellen Pao and Alexis Ohanian Explain Site Shut Down

TIME World

Man Flies High in Lawn Chair Attached To Balloons in Real-Life Up Stunt

The police weren't too happy about it

A Canadian man flew high in the sky on Sunday on a lawn chair attached to around 110 helium balloons.

CBC News reports that Daniel Boria did the stunt to gain attention for his cleaning products business. Police didn’t think it was very charming, however, as they arrested Boria.

Boria reportedly intended to parachute off the lawn chair into the Calgary Stampede, an annual rodeo in the area. However, he missed and ended up in a field.

The lawn chair and balloons may still be in the air.

[CBC News]

TIME Health Care

8 in 10 Doctors Admit to Treating Patients While Sick

TIME.com stock photos Health First Aid Kit Gloves
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

Even while acknowledging that it can put patients at risk, according to a new survey.

A vast majority of healthcare workers acknowledged that they show up to work while feeling sick, even if they know it poses a risk to their patients, according to a new survey.

Medical professionals including physicians, registered nurse practitioners, physician assistants and midwives will work while they are under the weather, according to results from a small survey published Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers surveyed over 530 attending physicians and advanced practice clinicians at a hospital and found that while 95.3% said they believed working while sick puts patients at risk, 83.1% had done it at least one time in the past year.

Most respondents said they would work while sick because they didn’t want to let their coworkers down. Others cited staffing concerns, not wanting to let down their patients or fear of being “ostracized” by their peers in the hospital.

The results come from one single hospital, so the findings may not apply to other medical offices. Still, the study authors conclude that the findings show an area of improvement for medical venues to both better protect patients and prevent health care worker burnout.

“Creating a safer and more equitable system of sick leave for health care workers requires a culture change in many institutions to decrease stigma—internal and external—associated with health care works illness,” reads a corresponding editorial. “Identifying solutions to prioritize patient safety must factor in workforce demands and variability in patient census to emphasize flexibility.”

TIME Research

90% of Americans Eat Too Much Salt

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Getty Images

A new report sheds light on Americans' sodium habits

Consuming too much sodium can be a risk factor for heart problems, and new federal data shows more than 90% of Americans eat too much.

The findings show that from 2011 to 2012, the average daily sodium intake among U.S. adults was 3,592 mg, which is well above the public health target set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) of 2,300 mg. The data comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 2013 survey of 180,000 American adults in 26 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico. The findings were published Thursday in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

Some Americans, however, are taking action to cut back, the report shows. About half of the U.S. adults surveyed said they were monitoring or reducing their sodium intake, and 20% said they had received medical advice to do so. People with high blood pressure were more likely to report they were doing something about their sodium consumption, and overall, people in Southern states were more likely to report such action or advice from medical providers.

Public health experts argue that people without high blood pressure could also benefit from cutting back. “Among adults without hypertension, most did not report taking action to reduce sodium intake, and an even smaller proportion reported receiving professional advice to reduced sodium,” the study authors write. “These findings suggest an opportunity for promoting strategies to reduce sodium consumption among all adults, with and without hypertension.”

Sodium intake recommendations have been the focus of controversy, with some researchers arguing that sodium levels are safe and that cutting back to very low recommended levels could be harmful. Others argue that high sodium consumption is related to serious health complications and contributes to millions of deaths every year. Some groups recommend limits that are even lower than the HHS; for instance, the American Heart Association recommends less than 1,500 mg a day.

In the new CDC report, researchers say that a high sodium habit doesn’t come cheap; medical costs for cardiovascular disease are predicted to triple from $273 billion to $818 billion between 2010 to 2030, and cutting back on sodium intake by 1,200 mg a day could save $18 billion in costs each year, they say.

TIME U.S.

This Obituary Is Only 2 Words But It’s Perfect

Well done, Douglas Legler

A short and sweet obituary for North Dakota resident Douglas Legler ran on Wednesday.

Per Legler’s request, the obit simply read: “Doug died.”

Legler’s daughter Janet Stoll told reporters that her father had always insisted on the two words. “I’m sure he’s laughing up there now,” she said.

h/t Fusion

TIME Accident

Shark Strikes Yet Again in North Carolina

This is the seventh for the state this summer

A man was attacked by a shark on Wednesday near Ocracoke Island in North Carolina, the seventh reported attack in the state since May.

The man was swimming in front of a lifeguard stand when he was pulled under water by a seven foot shark, FOX8 reports. He was able to swim out of the water and to safety, but is currently suffering from injuries to his rib cage, hip, hands and lower leg.

The new attack is now the seventh reported in North Carolina in just June and July. South Carolina has also been experiencing recent shark attacks.

Some experts say warmer water temperatures may be a contributing factor to the increase.

 

TIME Research

What Drinking Does to Your Body Over Time

Social drinking is not always benign

The effects of having a few drinks can differ person to person, but often people may not realize just how risky their drinking patterns are, or what that alcohol is doing to them under the hood.

There are two definitions for “safe” drinking. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines say moderate alcohol consumption is OK, which means having up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has its own recommendation it calls “low risk” drinking, which sets limits for what levels of drinking will put you at a low risk for developing an alcohol abuse issue later on. This comes out to no more than three drinks on any single day and no more than 7 drinks per week for women, and no more than four drinks on any single day and no more than 14 drinks per week for men.

According to Dr. George Koob, director of the NIAAA, the current body of evidence doesn’t show whether there are significant differences between someone who drinks at this level versus someone who never drinks. In some cases, there’s strong evidence to suggest that moderate wine consumption could actually benefit the heart. Though Koob says some studies have been controversial and it’s not determined what it is about wine or other parts of a person’s lifestyle that could be at play. There are also individual patterns and sensitivities that people should take into consideration at this level. Some people can handle the amount better than others.

If you genuinely stay within the healthy drinking limits, you’re likely at a low risk for alcohol-related health problems down the line.

The concept of binge drinking is often associated with college students and drinking to get “drunk.” But evidence suggests that people beyond college age also maintain those heavy drinking behaviors. The NIH defines it as five or more drinks for men and four or more drinks for women within two hours. Some of the risks associated with binge drinking are well known. It increases the risk for sexual assault, violence and self harm. But the physical effects of such behaviors on the body are often less discussed. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there’s strong evidence to suggest that regular binge drinking can damage the frontal cortex and areas of the brain involved in executive functions and decision making. Alcohol slows down the pace of the neurotransmitters in your brain that are critical for proper body responses and even moods.

“Abstaining from alcohol over several months to a year may allow structural brain changes to partially correct,” the NIH says. “Abstinence also can help reverse negative effects on thinking skills, including problem­ solving, memory, and attention.”

Long term drinking can also hurt your heart muscles making them unable to contract properly. It can also harm liver, pancreas and immune system function. Heavy drinking can prevent the protective white blood cells in your body to attack bacterial invaders like they’re supposed to. Drinking too much alcohol can also increase your risk for certain cancers like mouth and breast. Regular heavy drinking also increases the risk for some alcohol dependence. “It creeps up on people,” says Koob.

You can calculate how many “drinks” your cocktail adds up to here and assess how risky your own drinking behaviors are here.

TIME Cancer

Nearly 10 Million Americans Still Use Tanning Beds

Skin cancer may be scaring people away

It looks like tanning beds are finally becoming less popular, a new report reveals.

The number of U.S. adults who use indoor tanning beds—which are strongly linked to skin cancer—declined to 4.2% in 2013 from 5.5% in 2010, according to new research published in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

Even young adults are using tanning beds less than in the past. The researchers noted a drop from 11.3% of 18 to 29 year-olds using them in 2010 to a 8.6% in 2013.

Still, the researchers estimate that 7.8 million women and 1.9 million men still use tanning beds, and for some age groups, there appears to be more interest. For instance, the number of female tanners dropped in all age groups and among college graduates. However, the researchers noted a 177% increase in tanning among men between ages 40 to 49 and 71% higher among men 50 and up.

Though the study authors can’t say for certain, it’s likely the wider acknowledgement that indoor tanning beds can lead to cancer that has more Americans opting out. The hope among public health experts is that the trend will continue to lose popularity.

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