TIME Cancer

Nearly 10 Million Americans Still Use Tanning Beds

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Skin cancer may be scaring people away

It looks like tanning beds are finally becoming less popular, a new report reveals.

The number of U.S. adults who use indoor tanning beds—which are strongly linked to skin cancer—declined to 4.2% in 2013 from 5.5% in 2010, according to new research published in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

Even young adults are using tanning beds less than in the past. The researchers noted a drop from 11.3% of 18 to 29 year-olds using them in 2010 to a 8.6% in 2013.

Still, the researchers estimate that 7.8 million women and 1.9 million men still use tanning beds, and for some age groups, there appears to be more interest. For instance, the number of female tanners dropped in all age groups and among college graduates. However, the researchers noted a 177% increase in tanning among men between ages 40 to 49 and 71% higher among men 50 and up.

Though the study authors can’t say for certain, it’s likely the wider acknowledgement that indoor tanning beds can lead to cancer that has more Americans opting out. The hope among public health experts is that the trend will continue to lose popularity.

TIME ebola

Ebola Cases Resurface in Liberia After 2 Months of Being Ebola-Free

Liberia Ebola West Africa
Abbas Dulleh—AP Health workers wash their hands after taking a blood specimen from a child to test for the Ebola virus in an area where a 17-year old boy died from the virus on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on June 30, 2015.

A teenage boy died from the virus and may have infected others

Liberia has reported its second case of Ebola on Tuesday after nearly two months of being Ebola-free.

Liberia had been declared officially Ebola-free on May 9 after it had gone 42 days with no new cases.

On Sunday, the body of a teenage boy was discovered in a rural area outside of the capital Monrovia and was confirmed to have the virus, Reuters reports. The news was not made public until Tuesday. People who came into contact with the boy have been isolated, and at least one of those patients has tested positive.

Though Liberia was declared free from Ebola infections in May, the outbreak has continued in Guinea and Sierra Leone, which share borders. “There is no known source of infection and there’s no information about him traveling to Guinea or [Sierra Leone],” a spokesperson for the ministry of health told Science.

So far, Ebola has infected 27,400 people in all three countries, killing over 11,200.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

5 Foods That Taste Better in July Than They Will All Year

Here's what should be on your grocery list this month

Never know what’s growing now? Let’s take it one month at a time, with TIME‘s Foods That Taste Better Now Than They Will All Year.

We’re officially into summer, which means the produce department is looking plentiful. “It depends on where you are and what your climate is, but July is a great month,” says Deborah Madison, author of Vegetable Literacy. While some farmer’s markets will have different offerings compared to others, keep your eyes out for some of these fruits and veggies.

Figs: “There’s the early crop of figs this year, and there will be a second crop at the end of August,” says Madison, who lives in New Mexico. Just rinse your figs and trim the stems before eating.

Cherries: Madison says farmer’s market shoppers will likely continue seeing cherries brought to market, though the types of cherries may change as the season goes on. We are smack in the middle of both the tart and sweet cherry season now, so there’s no better time to pick up a pint.

Peas: Keep an eye out for the bright green pea pods. Peas taste their best in the summer, and according to Vegetable Literacy, if you live in higher altitudes, peas can be enjoyed all summer long. Snap peas taste their best when they are moist. When they start to dry, they can taste more starchy.

Peaches: If you can smell peaches, they’re ripe. While peach season can peak in states at different times, you’re definitely going to see some especially juicy ones in July. Peaches should be firm and without bruises on the outside.

Rhubarb: This vegetable is hearty since it comes from places with tough climates like China, Mongolia and Russia. Rhubarb can begin to appear in the Spring, but it can have a long summer season in some states. Remember to only eat the stalks and not the leaves, which are poisonous. Most of us enjoy rhubarb in our pie, but it can be good as a jam or can be eaten like applesauce.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

This Kind of Food Is Why America Is So Fat, Study Says

TIME.com stock photos Food Snacks Candy Chocolate
Elizabeth Renstrom for TIME

More calories in our food supply means more overeating

Worldwide, countries are dealing with a serious obesity problem. In the U.S. alone, more than two thirds of adults are overweight or obese. Now a new study suggests it likely has a lot to do with the make up of our food.

The new study, published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, looked at both the obesity rates and the supply of energy-dense—meaning high-calorie—foods in 69 countries, and found that both body weight and calories had increased in 56 of those states since 1971.

The finding was especially notable in high-income countries. “This suggests that, in high-income countries, a growing and excessive food supply is contributing to higher energy intake, as well as to increasing food waste,” the authors write. In the U.S. alone, the food energy supply went up by 768 calories per person between 1971 and 2008.

A wide reduction in physical activity may also be a contributing factor, the authors note, however, the surplus of available calories is likely leading people to overeat which in turn is adding on pounds for a lot of people. Other factors like pollution and gut bacteria should also be further studied to understand how they may contribute to weight gain as well, the researchers argue.

To combat the problem, the researchers argue that comprehensive approaches will be necessary. For instance, nation-wide policies should restrict the marketing of unhealthy food to young people and more packaged foods should have front of box nutritional labeling.

As always, eating more fresh foods rather than processed and exercising are two healthy habits worth adopting.
TIME Infectious Disease

California Lawmakers Pass Strict School Vaccine Bill

The bill ends vaccine exemptions for personal beliefs

The California senate has passed a bill that requires most children in public schools to get vaccinations and ends exemptions from vaccinations for personal beliefs.

The bill only allows for kids with serious health problems to not get vaccinated.

The bill is now heading to California Governor Jerry Brown, who has not said whether he will sign the bill. It would be one of the strictest vaccination laws in the country.

California recently experienced an outbreak of measles that was tied to a Disneyland amusement park. Many of the people infected were not vaccinated.

TIME Appreciation

Man Bought $30K Lottery Ticket by Accident

CT Lottery Bob Sabo becomes a “30X Cash 2nd Edition” instant game top prize winner.

He meant to buy a different ticket but didn't have his glasses on

A Connecticut man won $30,000 last week when he accidentally bought the wrong lottery ticket.

Bob Sabo didn’t want to wait in line at the Super Stop & Shop in Fairfield, Conn. to buy his lottery ticket, so he decided to purchase one from the lottery vending machine. He intended to buy two $20 tickets, but since he didn’t have his glasses on, he accidentally purchased one $30 ticket.

“When I got home and scratched the 30X ticket, I couldn’t believe it—we won $30,000. Winning the way we did was a very freaky thing!” Sabo told the CT Lottery.

Don’t we all wish we made mistakes like that.

TIME medicine

Minnesota Takes Half Step Toward Legalizing Marijuana

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Pills and oils are approved, but smoking marijuana remains prohibited

Minnesota eased a statewide ban on medical marijuana products Wednesday, approving the use of pills and oils for seriously ill patients, while upholding a ban on products that can be smoked.

Under the new law, users will be able to use liquid and pill extracts of marijuana plants, provided they are suffering from serious conditions such as epilepsy, HIV and cancer, the Associated Press reports. The law also restricts sales to only eight dispensaries within the state.

While legalization advocates hailed the new rules as a step forward, they argued that Minnesota’s approach was unusually restrictive, potentially excluding patients living in rural areas or on tight budgets from obtaining the drugs.

[AP]

TIME faith

Global Jewish Population Approaches Pre-Holocaust Levels

Roughly 70 years after the close of World War II, global Jewish population returns to 16.5 million

The global Jewish population is nearly as large as it was before the Holocaust, according to a new tally released by an Israeli think tank on Monday.

A report by the Jerusalem-based Jewish People Policy Institute estimates that the global Jewish population has reached 14.2 million people. If accounting for people with one Jewish parent and people who identify as partially Jewish, the number reaches close to pre-Holocaust levels of 16.5 million, the Associated Press reports.

The report says that the rise is due to natural growth, mainly in Israel. In addition, 59% of adult children in the U.S. who have one Jewish parent say they identify as Jewish.

About 6 million Jewish people were killed during the Holocaust.

[AP]

TIME animals

Siegfried and Roy’s White Lion Dies After Medical Procedure

Magicians Siegfried Roy lion white
Siegfried & Roy—Getty Images World-renowned illusionists and conservationists Siegfried & Roy pose with Pride, the Magical White Lion in this undated photo.

Legend went into cardiac and respiratory arrest

A 14-year-old white lion named Legend from the Siegfried and Roy act died at the Toledo Zoo in Ohio after undergoing a medical procedure.

Veterinarians at the zoo, where the lion was on loan, were treating the lion’s paws. Legend went into cardiac and respiratory arrest while being removed from the anesthesia, the Guardian reports.

The lion’s cause of death is still being determined, and the Guardian reports that the veterinarian at the zoo said that while there were risks to anesthesia, the procedure needed to be done to improve the cat’s quality of life.

Legend’s 14-year-old brother Courage also currently lives at the zoo.

[The Guardian]

TIME Appreciation

Husband Plans Second Wedding for Wife After She Loses Her Memory

After a serious car accident, Justice Stamper can't remember her wedding

Justice and Jeremy Stamper are planning their second wedding, since Justice can’t remember their first.

In August 2014, just weeks after the duo were married, Justice was in a severe car accident that resulted in some memory loss, PEOPLE reports. Even though Justice has looked at photos and watched videos of the event, nothing has come back to her.

“She said to me, ‘I don’t want you to be mad, but I do not remember the wedding,'” Jeremy told PEOPLE. “I, of course, was very upset, but I told her right then and there, ‘We will do it again.'”

The couple, who live in Bristol, Tenn., are now planning the celebration, but this time they are asking for donations on a GoFundMe page so it can be even more spectacular.

Read the full story at PEOPLE Magazine.

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