FRANCE-US-POLITICS-WOMEN-DEMO
Supporters of the Women's March in Paris, on Jan. 21, 2017.Eric Feferberg—AFP/Getty Images
FRANCE-US-POLITICS-WOMEN-DEMO
Women's March In Barcelona
A young Thai girl holds a "women's rights are human rights" sign at Roadhouse BBQ restaurant where many of the Bangkok Women's March participants gathered on January 21, 2017 in Bangkok, Thailand.
Women Demonstrate Against Trump Around the World
A woman activist holds placard on Metrorail on way to Women's March in Washington, D.C.
ITALY-US-POLITICS-PROTEST
Womens march in London
A woman waits for the start of the #IWillGoOut rally, organized to show solidarity with the Women's March in Washington, along a street in New Delhi, India January 21, 2017.
A demonstrator with a pink flower in his hair joins the crowd as they make their way towards the US Consulate during the Women's March held at Museumplein on January 21, 2017 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
GREECE-US-POLITICS-WOMEN-DEMO
Australians Take Part In Women's Marches To Protest Trump Inauguration TBC
GHANA-US-DEMO
Demonstrators protest against U.S. President Donald Trump during the Women's March inside Karura forest in Kenya's capital Nairobi
APTOPIX Britain Women's March
KOSOVO-US-POLITICS-PROTEST
TOPSHOT-GERMANY-US-POLITICS-INAUGURATION-PROTEST
Supporters of the Women's March in Paris, on Jan. 21, 2017.
Eric Feferberg—AFP/Getty Images
1 of 17

From Washington to Antarctica: Women's Marches Around the World

Jan 21, 2017

Millions of people around the world marched for women's rights on Saturday, one day after the ascension of Donald Trump to the American presidency. Officials in the nation's capital expected turnout for the city's Women's March on Washington to hit at least half a million people, reportedly swelling beyond the inauguration's crowds as the city's rail transportation heaved at the influx of protesters and supporters. From New York to Paris and even Antarctica, demonstrators made their messages clear by commanding respect, demanding equality and many of them railing against a leader who during his campaign unofficially coined the term "Nasty Woman." The phrase, used in reference to Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton during a debate, has instead become a proud rallying cry.

All products and services featured are based solely on editorial selection. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website.