A man crosses the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) logo in the lobby of CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, on August 14, 2008.
SAUL LOEB—AFP/Getty Images
By Sarah Begley
January 18, 2017

The CIA has made more than 12 million declassified pages from 930,000 documents available on the Internet for the first time.

The documents in question were part of Bill Clinton’s 1995 plan to declassify documents “of historical value” that were more than 25 years old; the archives of the documents were not made searchable until 2000, and they could only be accessed from four computers at the U.S. National Archives in College Park, Md., The Verge reports. Researchers and journalists had objected to the lack of access to the database, the CIA Records Search Tool (CREST).

“Access to this historically significant collection is no longer limited by geography,” CIA Director of Information Management Joseph Lambert wrote in a press release. “The American public can access these documents from the comfort of their homes,”

Interested readers can find files pertaining to everything from the Cuban Missile Crisis to Project MKUltra, an experiment in mind control.

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