TIME celebrities

21 Gorgeous Photos of Lauren Bacall

A classic Hollywood star, Bacall was known for her sultry looks and elegant style. As TIME wrote when she first made a name for herself in To Have and Have Not, in 1944, “Lauren Bacall has cinema personality to burn, and she burns both ends against an unusually little middle… She has a javelinlike vitality, a born dancer's eloquence in movement, a fierce female shrewdness and a special sweet-sourness”

TIME celebrity

Lauren Bacall Dies at 89

American actress Lauren Bacall
Sunset Boulevard/Corbis

"You know how to whistle, don't you, Steve? You just put your lips together and ... blow"

Screen legend Lauren Bacall has died at the age of 89.

The Humphrey Bogart Estate tweeted at 7:55 p.m. ET on Tuesday: “With deep sorrow, yet with great gratitude for her amazing life, we confirm the passing of Lauren Bacall.”

Born Betty Joan Perske in the Bronx, New York City, Bacall first rose to prominence opposite Humphrey Bogart in To Have and Have Not in 1944 —which featured her famously saucy line, “You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and … blow” — setting off one of Hollywood’s most iconic romances. Bogart and Bacall would marry in 1945, when she was 20 and he was 45, and were paired in three more movies together: The Big Sleep, Dark Passage and Key Largo.

Bacall’s list of co-stars reads as a who’s who of the Golden Age of Hollywood: Marilyn Monroe in How to Marry a Millionaire, Gregory Peck in Designing Women, June Allyson in Woman’s World. Equally well known for her stage work, she won two Tony Awards for Best Leading Actress in a Musical: in 1970 for Applause, based on the Oscar-winning film All About Eve, and in 1981 for Woman of the Year. She remained active throughout into her old age, with notable appearances in 1990’s Misery, as James Caan’s agent, and 2003’s Dogville, alongside Nicole Kidman. She also made a cameo as herself on HBO’s The Sopranos, and recently lent her recognizably resonant voice as a guest star on an episode of Family Guy.

Bacall remained with Bogart until his death from cancer in 1957. They had two children together, Stephen and Leslie. She later married actor Jason Robards in 1961, but they divorced eight years later. They had one son together, the actor Sam Robards.

TIME Opinion

Ironic Misandry: Why Feminists Pretending to Hate Men Isn’t Funny

The humor is lost on most people, and it's terrible PR for feminism

If you’ve stumbled into certain feminist corners of the Internet lately, you may have noticed the word misandry cropping up. No, not by men’s rights activists whining that feminists hate men (or at least, not just by them). By feminists. Who think it’s funny to use it ironically.

But let’s back up a little. What exactly IS misandry, you ask? It is literally the hatred of men (in ancient Greek, “mis” means hatred, and “andro“ means male or masculine). It is the inverse of misogyny.

When feminists joke that they are misandrists, they are riffing off the misguided popular notion that they are man-haters. They mean to satirize the women who say they are not feminists because they love men. It’s an inside, inside joke.

Granted, there is something amusing about a girlish decorative sampler with “misandry” embroidered in purple thread, in the way that gross contrast is often amusing. And there’s something droll about a quiz that measures your level of misandry by asking if you’ve “cut a man’s hair off while he’s sleeping thus destroying his power,” or a list of reimagined misandrist lullabies like, “Hush little baby, don’t say a word / Ever; your sister is talking.”

And the urge to fight these misconceptions about feminists with humor is understandable. Obviously, very few feminists actually hate men as a whole, and none actually want to “kill all men” or drink “male tears” as some of these so-called ironists like to joke.

But the irony is all too often lost, despite recent arguments that the right kind of guys are in on the joke and love it. But the anecdotal evidence of that is not convincing, and those friends of women who like to use the word misandry might are likely to be a self-selecting group. Last year, a 2013 HuffPost/YouGov poll found that only 23 percent of women and 16 percent of men consider themselves to be feminists. Of that 16 percent, surely even fewer would find jokes about misandry funny.

Parodying the tropes of feminism’s enemies is not, in itself, unfunny or unhelpful. Consider Leandra Medine’s engaging site Man Repeller, which riffs off of and rejects the notion that women’s fashion is all about attracting men. And it’s empowering to reappropriate labels like “witch” and “bra-burner” that have been flung as criticism at women who dare to question the oppressive status quo. A new Twitter account, @WomanAgainstFeminism, takes on the popular hashtag used by women who disavow the movement with satirical rationales that humorously point out all the ways that women do need feminism.

But inherent in this word “misandry” is hatred. And inherent in phrases like “ban men” and “male tears” are cruelty and violence. If a man wore a tee shirt that said “misogynist,” even if he were a dyed-in-the-wool feminist, wearing it tongue-in-cheek, it would not be funny. It would be misguided.

What feminists really hate is the patriarchy—the web of institutions that systemically oppress women. And to tear it down, we need as many allies as we can get. Telling half the population that we hate them, even in jest, is not the way to do that. Feminism is still very much engaged in the battle for hearts and minds; appealing to the sense of humor of a very small minority of the population can be a good way to alienate the rest. That’s not to say that feminists should water down their true demands and complaints to appeal to broader swaths of the population. Nevertheless, to get folks on your side, you need an an appealing message. Humor can help. But ironic misandry is just bad PR.

TIME health

Dieting Young Makes Women More Likely to Be Obese Later

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Image Source—Image Source/Getty Images

New research says managing weight at a young age could lead to dangerous behavior later in life

New research suggests that the younger a woman is when she first starts dieting, the more likely she will be to suffer from adverse health effects later in life.

Led by Dr. Pamela Keel of Florida State University, a team of researchers interviewed college women every decade beginning in 1982, and followed up with each woman 10 years later to evaluate how dieting impacted their long-term health. Those women who began trying to manage their weight at a young age were more likely to practice behaviors like induced vomiting and excessive drinking, and were also more likely to be overweight or obese by the time they were 30.

The research is careful not to speculate the cause of this correlation, but does suggest healthy behavior should be promoted in girls as early as elementary school to prevent negative body image as they enter puberty. Since more than half of teenage girls attempt to control their weight in unhealthy ways, from suppressing their appetite with cigarettes to taking laxatives to suffering from anorexia or bulimia, a huge number of women are at risk for weight-related complications later in life. Parents who are concerned about their children’s weight are advised to implement a more holistic approach than dieting, such as helping their kids to get more exercise, cutting down on screen time and putting more fruits and vegetables on the plate at dinnertime.

TIME Fine Art

This Dirty Bed Just Sold for $3.77 Million

Tracey Emin's 'My Bed' To Be Auctioned At Christie's
Tracy Emin's 1998 piece My Bed on display at Christie's in London on June 27, 2014 Rob Stothard—Getty Images

For the price one buyer paid for Tracey Emin’s ‘My Bed’, you could buy 2,500 TempurPedics

When Tracey Emin got dumped, she didn’t get out of bed for four days, depressed. Then she took her dirty bed and turned it into a famous work of art.

‘My Bed’ was sold at a Christie’s auction in London on Tuesday for around $3.77 million, a huge spike since it sold to world-class art collector Charles Saatchi in 2000 for about $200,000.

The work consists of dirty sheets, underpants stained by menses, used condoms, empty liquor bottles, and pregnancy tests. It was shortlisted for the coveted Turner Prize in 1999, but did not win. It did, however, help cinch Emin’s notoriety as one of the YBAs—that is, Young British Artists, though she and her contemporaries like Damien Hirst are no longer so young.

In an interview last year with the New York Times Magazine, Emin said revisiting ‘My Bed’ when reinstalling it for exhibits brought back evocative memories of her youth: “I was thinking, with the cigarettes, that’s so weird because I don’t smoke anymore. I haven’t had sex for years, and there’s this condom. God, there’s a tampon, and I haven’t had a period for years.”

The work is arguably Emin’s best-known, rivaled only by ‘Everyone I Have Ever Slept With 1963–1995,’ a tent whose interior she appliquéd with the names of everyone whose bed she had ever shared, sexually or platonically. That work, also acquired by Saatchi, was destroyed in the Momart warehouse fire in London in 2004.

‘My Bed’ sold for approximately $3.77 million, which would buy you something in the region of 2,500 ordinary beds priced at $1,500 each.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

The Government Wants Young Farmers To Hit the Hay (Literally)

US-IT-FARMING
Andrew Isaacson watches from the cockpit of a tractor in a corn field as screens show where he has fertilized at the Little Bohemia Creek farm on June 17, 2014 in Warwick, Md. Brendan Smialowski—AFP/Getty Images

Intended as a ‘one-stop-shop’ for beginning farmers, it promises the full range of financial and technical support

The USDA has launched a New Farmers website targeted at young people struggling to get their start in the agriculture industry.

The site brings together in one place a number of programs already available to newcomers: It can help young farmers get off the ground with a variety of loans from the Farm Service Agency, which often provides critical resources to those who are unable to get help from traditional lenders. It provides crop insurance for a fruits, vegetables and grains. And through the Transition Incentive Program, it can facilitate transfer of farmland from retiring farmers to new and socially disadvantaged farmers and vets.

What’s more: Aspiring organic farmers can find help with the cost of certification—which is especially relevant, as organic farmers are younger on average, and the market for organic foods shows no signs of slowing. They can also get help with land conservation and soil health.

As the American farm population ages out (the average is now 58), it is increasingly critical that a new generation is in place to produce our food. “We must help new farmers get started if America is going to continue feeding the world and maintain a strong agriculture economy,” said U.S. Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden in the announcement.

If the site proves useful to those getting their start, it just might help launch the next fleet of farmers.

TIME Diet/Nutrition

Nestlé Is Developing an Instant-Nutrient Food Machine

The 'Iron Man' device could work like Nespresso

Pretty soon, treating your Vitamin D deficiency could be as simple as firing up your espresso machine. Or so Nestlé hopes.

The research arm of the Swiss food and beverage company, Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS), is hard at work on a program called “Iron Man” that aims to measure nutritional deficiencies in group’s or individual’s diets and produce tailor-made remedies. These might take the form of powder similar to instant coffee capsules, like those used in Nestlé’s popular Nespresso machines. Running low on zinc? Press a few buttons for the cure, and you might get to slurp it down with a double latte.

The exact form and function of the machine is yet to be determined, NIHS director Ed Baetge tells Bloomberg, and will take years to develop. A huge obstacle is in getting consumers information about their complete nutrition profile to assess which nutrients they’re lacking; at present, such tests run into the hundreds of dollars. Nestlé wants to bring that cost way down into an affordable range.

The current limit in regulation around supplements might help such a product get to market without much fuss. But there’s been significant questioning in the scientific community as to the value of such supplements—how much do they really help, and are supplements an efficient way of delivering nutrients when compared with food? And could these supplements actually hurt us?

Without hard facts, it’s hard to know whether “Iron Man” would truly help consumers or simply spark another fad diet. By the time it’s ready for the market, perhaps research will show whether such a quick-fix is the cure for all maladies or part of the problem.

TIME Media

Meet 10 of China’s Most Powerful Women

The critically acclaimed MAKERS series goes to China

After its critical acclaim last year with the documentary MAKERS: Women Who Make America, AOL has taken its storytelling brand to China to highlight women whose accomplishments have shattered expectations and serve as an inspiration to their peers. The selection process was overseen in part by Yang Lan, a broadcast journalist often dubbed the “Oprah of China.”

Li Yinhe

First female sexologist in China

After studying at the University of Pittsburgh, Li became fascinated by the widely available research on American sexual mores, completely absent in her native China. Her book, Their World: a Study of Homosexuality in China, proved iconoclastic for the country.

Gong Li

Actor

Known for films like Raise the Red Lantern and Memoirs of a Geisha, Gong has starred in numerous Chinese films that have won her awards from the Berlin International Film Festival to Cannes. She was named a UNESCO Artist for Peace in 2000.

Fu Ying

Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs

After a string of government jobs, Fu became China’s ambassador to the Philippines in 1998, then to Australia in 2003, then to the U.K. in 2007. She’s been praised for her expert handling of the media after western pushback against China’s successful bid to host the Olympics.

Guo Jianmei

First public interest lawyer in China

In 1995, Guo was inspired at the U.N. Fourth World Conference on Women by Hillary Clinton’s now-famous maxim: “Human rights are women’s rights and women’s rights are human rights.” Not long after, she founded a women’s legal aid NGO, which subsequently earned her an award from Clinton as a Woman of Courage.

Li Yan

Short-track speed skating coach

Li won a silver medal in the 1992 Winter Olympics and later went on to coach Apolo Ohno to his gold medal win in the 2006 Winter Olympics. She has coached the Chinese national team through the last two Olympic seasons.

Hu Shuli

Investigative journalist

The editor-in-chief of Caixin Media Company has made a name for herself through hard-hitting journalism—a particularly challenging accomplishment in China. She famously reported on corruption in the financial industry, and has been included on the TIME 100.

Dong Mingzhu

Chairman and president, Gree Electric

Dong rose through the ranks at Gree Electric, first selling air conditioners then overseeing the sales team. She was appointed director of the department in 1994 and increases sales by a factor of seven. This accomplishment paved the way for her to eventually take the top job at the company.

Yang Liping

Dance artist

A dancer from rural China, Yang studied the dance cultures of various Chinese minorities as a young woman. Committed to bringing these traditions to the wider public, she raised money to create and perform her first piece, “Spirit of the Peacock” in the 1980s, and went on to direct, choreograph and perform in blockbuster dance shows throughout China, Europe and the U.S.

Laura Cha Shin May-lung

Former vice-chair of the China Securities Regulatory Commission

After a successful career as a lawyer, first in California then in Hong Kong, she joined the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission and eventually held the position of Deputy Chairman. She then moved on to be vice chair of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, becoming the first non-mainlander in the role.

Yan Geling

Novelist and screenwriter

Yan is known in the U.S. for books like The Banquet Bug and The Lost Daughter of Happiness. Many of her novels have been adapted for films like The Flowers of War, and her stories are highly acclaimed in China.

TIME Food & Drink

In Honor of Mario Batali’s New Show, Here Are 10 Photos of Him in Crocs

Though High Road goes highbrow, the Babbo chef sticks with his pedestrian kicks

Mario Batali’s new show may be shot in black and white, but that doesn’t mean he’s not still making the most of his signature orange Crocs.

The Hulu series, The High Road With Mario Batali, debuted today with an episode guest starring George Stephanopoulos, who Batali asks to don the “footwear of choice: orange slippers like mine.”

“I am not worthy!” says Stephanopoulos.

“Oh yes you are,” replies Batali, who famous purchased 200 pairs of the comfy shoes last year and has his name on a special line of Crocs’ black and orange “Bistro” shoes. After Stephanopoulos slips on a pair, the chef admits, “At this point, actually, George, I find you sexually attractive now!”

“That’s a little weird,” says the ABC anchor.

Sex symbols or clown shoes, don’t expect the foam clogs to disappear from Batali’s wardrobe anytime soon.

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