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Shannon Goodin, 24, Owosso, Mich. A first-time voter who doesn’t consider herself a Democrat or a Republican, Goodin says Trump earned her support by being “a big poster child for change,” adding, “Politicians don’t appeal to us. Clinton would go out of her way to appeal to minorities, immigrants, but she didn’t really for everyday Americans.”
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Shannon Goodin, 24, Owosso, Mich. A first-time voter who doesn’t consider herself a Democrat or a Republican, Goodin says Trump earned her support by being “a big poster child for change,” adding, “Politicians don’t appeal to us. Clinton would go out of her way to appeal to minorities, immigrants, but she didn’t really for everyday Americans.”Lise Sarfati for TIME
Shannon Goodin, 24, Owosso, Mich. A first-time voter who doesn’t consider herself a Democrat or a Republican, Goodin says Trump earned her support by being “a big poster child for change,” adding, “Politicians don’t appeal to us. Clinton would go out of her way to appeal to minorities, immigrants, but she didn’t really for everyday Americans.”
Darryl Wimbley, 48, Saginaw, Mich.After two decades as a car salesman, Wimbley hopes to franchise his hotdog­ stand business. This year was the first time he voted for a Republican president over a Democrat. "America is a business. It is not a soup kitchen," he says. "I have made a lot of money for other people. It is time I make it for myself."
Casey Voss, 36, and daughter Sidney, 16, Owosso, Mich.A beauty-salon owner, Casey voted for Trump because he promised change, the same reason she voted for Barack Obama in 2008. "I'm scared about every dollar that comes into my business. I¹m scared about what that means in Obamacare, in taxes," she says. "Every single thing happening to me is out of my control."
Thomas and Erica McTague, 38 and 33, Plymouth, PA.Thomas, a police officer, and Erica, a hairstylist, voted largely oneconomic issues. "Go back 60, 70 years and this area had industry and people had good jobs," he says. "When Trump talked about getting rid of all this free-trade stuff, he brought to life the way this country should be going."
Sara Vasquez, 27, Saginaw, Mich.A student who works part-time in retail, Vasquez sees her grandfather as a role model. A migrant farm laborer from Mexico, he died as a U.S. citizen who owned a million-dollar home. "I'm all for immigration if it is done legally, and for people wanting to live the American Dream, like my grandfather did," she says.
Joseph Dougherty, 49, Nanticoke, PA.A lifelong Democrat and former mayor of his small town, Dougherty became a Republican to vote in the primary for Trump, who he says is more representative of "hard-working, blue collar workers looking forfamily-sustaining jobs." Says Dougherty: "We didn't leave the Democratic Party. The Democratic Party left us."
Bob Kalinowski, 35, Nanticoke, PA.A fourth-generation resident, Kalinowski says he foresaw Trump¹s victory early. "I think people saw us as hicks with pitchforks, the localreporter says. But the Trump supporters in this community aresmall-business owners, firefighters, correctional officers, good peopletrying to take care of their families."
Naomi Hines, 26, Owosso, Mich.A baker at Meijer, Hines is a member of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 951, which endorsed Clinton. "You weren't brought into this world to rely on Ms. Suzy down the street to pay for you," she says of her vote for Trump. "That was what my grandfather instilled in me, and he was a Democrat."
As the daughter of a Teamster and a textile mill worker, Woodrosky always thought of her membership in the Democratic Party "as a birthright."
Shannon Goodin, 24, Owosso, Mich. A first-time voter who doesn’t consider herself a Democrat or a Republican, Goodin say
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Lise Sarfati for TIME
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Meet the Voters Who Helped Put Donald Trump in the White House

Dec 07, 2016
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