TIME celebrities

Read the Transcript of Amy Schumer’s Emotional Speech on Gun Control

"I have thought about these victims each day since the tragedy"

Comedian and actress Amy Schumer joined her cousin, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D—N.Y.), to propose gun control measures Monday in the wake of a deadly shooting in Louisiana during a screening of her movie Trainwreck.

The New York Democrat first outlined a three-stage plan to tackle gun violence: firstly, to reward states for sharing information about felons, domestic abusers and mentally ill people, and denying funding to those who don’t; to get the Justice Dept to survey all 50 states on their standards for treating mentally ill people who are a danger to themselves and others; and to get Congress to fully fund mental health and substance abuse programs.

The younger Schumer spoke next, giving an often emotional reaction to the shooting and its aftermath. Here is her statement in full:

For me, the pain I share with so many other Americans on the issue of gun violence was made extremely personal to me on Thursday, July 23 when — I’m not even going to say his name, when this — when he sat down for my movie Trainwreck at the Grand Theater in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Two lives were tragically lost and others injured, and I have thought about these victims each day since the tragedy. Jillian Johnson, 33, a mother, daughter, sister, and a wonderful wife. She was an artist. I think we would have been friends. And Mayci Breaux, who was 21, who planned on marrying her high school sweetheart. She was an honor student at Louisiana State University where she was studying to become a radiology technician. She was kind and loved her family very much and she always made time for them.

When I heard about this news, I was completely devastated. I wanted to go down to Louisiana, and then I was angry. My heart goes out to Jillian and Mayci, to the survivors, to the families and everyone who was tied to the tragic, senseless and horrifying actions of this man who shouldn’t have been able to put his hands on a gun in the first place.

I’m not sure why this man chose my movie to end these two beautiful lives and injure nine others, but it was very personal for me. Anyone who knows me, knows that I love Louisiana. It’s my favorite state, whenever I have a couple of days off I go down there and I — because I love the people there. They’re the coolest, strongest people I’ve ever met. and the thought of this community being turned around and upside down by this stings me.

Unless something is done and done soon, dangerous people will continue to get their hands on guns. We know what can happen when they do. I was heartbroken when I heard about Columbine and Sandy Hook and Aurora, and so many names of other places seared into our memories, and I was heartbroken when I heard about Lafayette and I still am.

And what Chuck said here, it deserves unanimous support. We never know why people choose to do these things but sadly we always find out how, how the shooter got their gun. It’s often something that should haven’t happened in the first place, and today’s push makes so much sense because it seeks to address the how.

We need a background check system without holes and fatal flaws. We need one with accurate information that protects us like a firewall. The critics scoff and say well, there’s no way to stop crazy people from doing crazy things but they’re wrong. There is a way to stop them. Preventing dangerous people from getting guns is very possible. We have common-sense solutions. We can toughen background checks and stop the sale of firearms to folks who have a violent history or history of mental illness. We can invest more in treating mental illness instead of slashing funding.

These are not extreme ideas and what Chuck is describing are sensible measures and restrictions and no one wants to live in a country where a felon, the mentally ill or other dangerous people can get their hands on a gun with such ease. The time is now for American people to rally for these changes.

These are my first public comments on the issue of gun violence, but I can promise you they will not be my last.

TIME Foreign Policy

Watch Live: Hillary Clinton Calls on Congress to Lift Cuba Embargo

Hilary Clinton speaks at Florida International University in Miami, were she will call Congress to lift the embargo on Cuba

TIME Books

Here Are the Best Books of 2015 So Far

See TIME's picks for our favorite titles from the front half of the year

It’s turning into a big year for readers. Though highly-anticipated releases from authors such as Jonathan Franzen and Harper Lee remain on the horizon, 2015 has already produced enough great books to topple a nightstand.

To help you sort through the year’s offerings or choose which titles to add to your summer reading list, TIME has ranked the best books of 2015 (so far). The picks span genre and form — including a darkly enchanting collection of short stories, a delightful novel featuring a dysfunctional bride-to-be and a singing memoir chronicling both grief and, yes, taming a hawk. Happy reading!

  • A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson

    a god in ruins

    Atkinson covers four generations of the Todd family that was at the center of her novel, Life After Life. The narrative jumps throughout the 20th century around the story of Teddy Todd, a Royal Air Force pilot in World War II who struggles with his postwar survival.

  • Seveneves by Neal Stephenson

    seveneves

    When disaster dooms the planet, people across the world unite to send a coalition into outer space and ensure the survival of their species. After 5,000 years, seven races of humans stem from the survivors, and they attempt to return to a changed earth.

  • I Take You by Eliza Kennedy

    i take you

    Lily Wilder, a promiscuous lawyer in New York, prepares to marry her archaeologist fiancé, Will. The novel follows her difficulties embracing monogamy in both theory and practice, told with the inflection of Lily’s humor.

  • Get in Trouble by Kelly Link

    get-in-trouble

    Each of these nine stories takes place in a seemingly normal setting, such as a hotel or at a birthday party, into which dark elements of the fantastic and supernatural subtly intrude.

  • Trigger Warning by Neil Gaiman

    trigger warning

    A collection of tales from virtuoso storyteller Neil Gaiman, ranging from horror to science fiction to fairy tales to verse. They include “adventure story,” Gaiman’s rumination on death, and “a calendar of tales,” short takes inspired by his replies to fan tweets.

  • H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

    H is for Hawk

    An experienced falconer, Macdonald resolves to train a vicious predator, the goshawk, as a means to cope with the death of her father. This stunning memoir explores the deep strange bond she forms with her bird.

  • The Story of Alice by Robert Douglas-Fairhurst

    the story of alice

    The Story of Alice charts the curious, controversial friendship between Oxford mathematician Charles Dodgson (more commonly known as Lewis Carroll) and Alice Liddell, the child for whom he created Alice in Wonderland. The book also explores how and why Alice in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking Glass, have had such lasting cultural resonance.

  • The Brothers by Masha Gessen

    Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen’s passionate, opinionated, deeply reported exploration of the long road that led the Tsarnaev brothers to commit the Boston Marathon bombing. She traces the family’s history from Chechnya to a precarious Boston-area immigrant demi-monde, asking urgent questions and avoiding simple answers.

  • The Folded Clock by Heidi Julavits

    Inspired by diaries from her childhood, Heidi Julavits chronicles her daily life in this diary-form memoir that is simultaneously about small details and big ideas.

  • How Music Got Free by Stephen Witt

    Journalist Stephen Witt writes a lucid, mordantly funny account of the rise of digital music piracy, starting with the story of a worker in a North Carolina CD-pressing plant who personally leaked more than 2,000 albums over eight years.

TIME Microsoft

Your Complete Guide to Microsoft Windows 10

It comes out early Wednesday morning

Microsoft is rolling out Windows 10 beginning at 12 a.m. ET Wednesday morning. Here’s everything you need to know about the latest Windows operating system before installing it.

5 Windows 10 Features We Can’t Wait to Use:

Microsoft’s personal digital assistant will feel familiar to anyone who regularly gives commands to Siri or Google Now, with one essential difference: Cortana will be baked into your desktop. As a result, Cortana can conduct a single search across your hard drive, as well as the cloud and the web, bundling the results into a single pop-up menu.

How to Install Windows 10 in 2 Easy Steps:

Ready to make the move to Windows 10? Here’s a quick and dirty guide to installing it. As with all major upgrades, remember to back up your machine first. It’s also a good idea to check if your computer can handle the new software.

Here’s How Windows 10 Could Kill Passwords Forever:

When Microsoft’s Windows 10 launches Wednesday, a lucky few users will be greeted at the login screen by a cartoon eyeball that appears to want to lock eyes with its owner. Do so, and it will activate a 3-D face scan that signs in users in seconds, no password required. The Windows team calls this snappy new login feature “Hello.”

These 5 Windows 10 Features Will Make Apple Users Jealous:

Windows 10 has a screen sensing feature called “Continuum,” which morphs your device’s layout according to how you’re using it. Got a touchscreen? Windows 10 strips away the tiny menus and fattens up the buttons. A PC? Back they go for easy clicking. The seamless switch from tablet to desktop suddenly makes those 2-in-1 tablet PCs — like Microsoft’s own Surface lineup — a far more enticing proposition.

Why Windows 10 Users May Never Use Google Again:

Microsoft’s new Windows 10 software, out Wednesday, is effectively a sneak attack on Google, packing a new desktop search bar that can field just about any question under the sun. And it’s powered in part by Microsoft’s own Bing search engine, meaning the move could help Microsoft gain even more of the search market share against its foremost rival.

 

Why Windows 10 Is So Important for Microsoft’s Future:

Microsoft’s effort to right those wrongs arrives this week with Wednesday’s launch of Windows 10 (the company skipped “Windows 9″). Windows 10 lets users easily restore the old Windows interface, while simultaneously gently nudging people to try the new style, too. I’ve been using a beta version of Windows 10 for some time, and it feels like a solid operating system. Over time, it will probably help Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella reach his goal of having 1 billion Windows-powered devices on the market by the next two-to-three years.

Here’s What Really Makes Microsoft’s Cortana So Amazing:

Microsoft’s Cortana team says the goal is to strike up a chatty, inoffensive rapport with users, in the hope that users will reward Cortana with their trust and open the kimono on their personal data. That data is critical to Cortana’s success, because if Microsoft wants to outwit the brainiest digital assistants on the market — Apple’s Siri and Google Now — Cortana will first need to take a good, hard look at your browser history, your emails and your web searches. With your permission, of course.

This Is Microsoft’s Trick to Make Office Way Better on Smartphones

Microsoft has kept that dividing line in mind when designing the next generation of Office apps for Windows 10, which launches this summer. TIME got an early look at the new Windows Phone apps this week, which will be released in preview mode for Windows Phone Insiders by the end of the month. The company hopes the software’s new interfaces will let workers switch seamlessly from desktops to tablets to smartphones without straining their eyes, fingers or thumbs.

It Will Be Ridiculously Easy to Bring Apple and Android Apps to Windows

App developers whistled and applauded at Microsoft’s bombshell announcement Wednesday that they’ll be able to take code for Android and Apple apps and import it directly into the Windows ecosystem.

This Is Microsoft’s Big Secret Windows 10 Feature:

Microsoft announced last November Windows 10 would pack a technology called AllJoyn. An open source framework that encourages devices to be interoperable, AllJoyn was developed by the AllSeen Alliance, a group of more than 150 companies including the likes of Electrolux, Honeywell, LG, and Qualcomm that have banded together to make an open standard for Internet of Things (IoT) devices to speak to each other.

Microsoft Will Sell Windows 10 on a USB Stick:

Microsoft has confirmed it will make Windows 10 available for purchase via a USB stick, replacing the iconic disc packages that have defined the brand’s image for decades.

 

 

TIME celebrities

Celebrities React With Sadness to Bobbi Kristina Brown’s Death

Everyone from Oprah to Missy Elliot shared condolences online

It wasn’t long after Whitney Houston’s family confirmed that the late singer’s 22-year-old daughter, Bobbi Kristina Brown, had died, that social media was flooded with condolences.

Brown died on Sunday, nearly six months after she was found unresponsive in a bathtub in her Georgia home in late January. The young woman never fully regained consciousness and had been on life-support since the incident.

The only daughter of Houston — who died three years ago from an accidental drowning in a bathtub — and singer Bobby Brown, Bobbi Kristina had spent much of her life in the limelight. As news of her death spread, everyone from Reverend Al Sharpton to Oprah and Missy Elliot to Ava DuVernay expressed their sadness and offered condolences to the family on Twitter.

Read next: Bobbi Kristina Brown, Daughter of Whitney Houston, Dies at 22

Download TIME’s mobile app for iOS to have your world explained wherever you go

TIME North Korea

North Korea Has Banned Foreign Envoys From Having Media Critical of Kim Jong Un

South Korea Korean War Anniversary
Lee Jin-man—AP An effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is set up by South Korean conservative activists in Seoul on June 25, 2015, during a rally against the North to mark the 65th anniversary of the outbreak of the Korean War

But isn't that pretty much everything?

Foreign diplomats are no longer allowed to keep content critical of the North Korean regime or supreme leader Kim Jong Un, according to a new ordinance.

Anything considered slanderous to the Hermit Kingdom or Kim, which could include photographs, movies, literature or files saved on phones or computers, can no longer be kept by foreign embassies or international organizations in the capital Pyongyang, reports UPI.

The U.K. has decried the ban as a violation of international standards of human rights. The ordinance, issued June 26, comes on the heels of a U.K. Foreign Office report on human rights and democracy, which classified North Korea as a “human-rights concern” for reasons including its limits on freedom of expression.

North Korea has a long history of censorship and is considered one of the world’s most repressive regimes. Late last year, U.S. envoy to the U.N. Samantha Power accused Pyongyang of the cyberattack on Sony Pictures, apparently in retaliation for the release of the studio’s The Interview, a movie parodying Kim and the regime.

Compared with the general population, diplomats live in relative comfort. But the ban is another in a long list of inconveniences, which includes frequent blackouts due to power shortages.

[UPI]

TIME Theater

Jack Gleeson, King Joffrey on Game of Thrones, Snubs Hollywood for London Stage

"Game Of Thrones" Season 4 New York Premiere
Taylor Hill—FilmMagic/Getty Images Actor Jack Gleeson attends the 'Game Of Thrones' Season 4 premiere at Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center on March 18, 2014 in New York City

The 23-year-old Cork native says he's turned down top roles to trend the boards

Jack Gleeson has kept busy in the year since his hated character on Game of Thrones was dramatically killed off.

The Irish star, who played King Joffrey in the HBO drama, has taken a break from the silver screen to found his own theater company and is preparing to debut the off-beat comedy Bears in Space at London’s Soho Theatre.

Gleeson started the Collapsing Horse Theatre Company with friends he met while at university, quashing rumors that the star would retire after his grisly Game of Thrones exit.

“Offers [for blockbuster roles] came in, but I just had a lack of desire to do a big action movie. What I enjoy most is this kind of thing, where I can have fun with my friends,” Gleeson told the London Evening Standard.

His latest production is about the thawing of two cryogenically frozen bears and their subsequent romp through space. The play has been well-received and was deemed a “must-see” by a review in Edinburgh Festivals Magazine.

Bears in Space plays at the Soho Theatre from Aug. 3 to 22.

TIME Food & Drink

The Fascinating Histories Behind 9 of Your Favorite Foods

The first known reference to apple pie was in 1589

Food is one of the most basic necessities of life, but just because it’s basic doesn’t mean it’s simple. (Yes, even pie.)

Over the years, TIME has occasionally hosted a regular “brief history of” feature, and it often took a look at some of the facts that lie behind what’s on our plates. From the disputed Buffalo wing creation myth to peanut-butter-based health trends of the 19th century, those stories add the flavor of history to items that are already pretty flavorful on their own.

Here are some of our favorites:

  • Pie

    Apple pie a la mode
    H. Armstrong Roberts—Retrofile/Getty Images Slice of apple pie with ice cream, circa 1950s

    The “pye”—as it used to be spelled—is a venerable dish, which can be traced all the way back to ancient Greece and Rome. But those pastry-based dishes weren’t the desserts we tend to think of today. Instead, they were overwhelmingly savory dishes. And for good reason: the crusts could help the contents of the pie (meat, typically) last a little longer than they would otherwise.

    Even apple pies didn’t used to look the way they do now:

    There are few things as American as apple pie, as the saying goes, but like much of America’s pie tradition, the original apple pie recipes came from England. These pre-Revolutionary prototypes were made with unsweetened apples and encased in an inedible shell. Yet the apple pie did develop a following, and was first referenced in the year 1589, in Menaphon by poet R. Greene: “Thy breath is like the steeme of apple pies.”

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Pie

  • Eggnog

    Eggnog
    L. Mueller—MCT via Getty Images Eggnog

    Eggnog is centuries old, it turns out:

    While culinary historians debate its exact lineage, most agree eggnog originated from the early medieval Britain “posset,” a hot, milky, ale-like drink. By the 13th century, monks were known to drink a posset with eggs and figs. Milk, eggs, and sherry were foods of the wealthy, so eggnog was often used in toasts to prosperity and good health.

    But it wasn’t always associated with the end-of-year holiday season. That happened when the drink came to the Americas; even George Washington had his own signature recipe for eggnog, which by his time had begun to be made with rum.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Eggnog

  • Waffles

    Hot Breakfast
    Chaloner Woods—Getty Images A plate of buttered waffles made in an Easywork waffle iron, in 1947

    This peculiarly patterned breakfast staple has a surprisingly long and illustrious history. The ancient Greeks used a tool kind of like a waffle iron to make cakes, and the treat came to the New World with some of its earliest European settlers:

    Waffles arrived in the U.S. with the Pilgrims, who sampled them in Holland en route to Massachusetts. Thomas Jefferson reportedly brought a waffle iron home from France around 1789, helping spark a fad for waffle parties in the States.

    But it wasn’t until the 1930s that a California family combined instant waffle mix, electricity and ingenuity to come up with a way to mass-produce waffles. The eventual result, if you haven’t already guessed, was Eggos.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Waffles

  • Peanut Butter

    Oh! Boy Homogenized Peanut Butter
    Buyenlarge / ;Getty Images A 1930s peanut butter jar label

    Peanut butter’s origins are a bit mysterious. Contrary to the popular myth that George Washington Carter came up with the idea, there’s evidence that some version of peanut butter was being made at least a couple decades before he published his 1916 text How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it For Human Consumption:

    Peanut butter’s true inventor is unknown, but Dr. John Harvey Kellogg has as good a claim to the title as anyone. In 1895, the cereal pioneer patented a process for turning raw peanuts into a butter-like vegetarian health food that he fed to clients at his Battle Creek, Mich., sanatorium. The taste caught on, and in a few years, the spread had gone mainstream.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Peanut Butter

  • Buffalo Wings

    Football Fans And Competitive Eaters Attend Annual "Wing Bowl"
    William Thomas Cain—Getty Images Buffalo wings await contestants during Wing Bowl 16 at the Wachovia Center Feb. 1, 2008 in Philadelphia

    Unlike peanut butter, Buffalo wings have a an easily identified origin: Buffalo, N.Y. But what exactly happened to spark its birth is a little blurrier:

    There are at least two different versions of the Buffalo wing’s origin, although they contain the same basic facts. The first plate of wings was served in 1964 at a family-owned establishment in Buffalo called the Anchor Bar. The wings were the brainchild of Teressa Bellissimo, who covered them in her own special sauce and served them with a side of blue cheese and celery because that’s what she had available. Except for the occasional naysayer who claims to be the true inventor, these facts are reasonably undisputed. The rest of the story is anybody’s guess.

    In one version of the story, the dish was invented merely to get rid of a surplus of chicken wings; in another version, Bellissimo’s son specifically asked for wings.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Buffalo Wings

  • Maple Syrup

    Children Tapping Maple Trees
    Underwood Archives / Getty Children from the Scarborough School tapping syrup from a maple tree on financier Frank Vanderlip's estate. Scarborough, N.Y., March 18, 1927

    The American maple-syrup industry can be traced back to the 17th century, when farmers began to tap the trees on their properties for a sweetener that was, at the time, cheaper than sugar:

    Early settlers in the U.S. Northeast and Canada learned about sugar maples from Native Americans. Various legends exist to explain the initial discovery. One is that the chief of a tribe threw a tomahawk at a tree, sap ran out and his wife boiled venison in the liquid. Another version holds that Native Americans stumbled on sap running from a broken maple branch.

    The old system of making maple syrup—leaving buckets under taps, collecting sap, hauling the buckets to the sugar house to be heated—was eventually widely replaced by a method that used tubes and vacuums rather than buckets and gravity.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Maple Syrup

  • Salt

    A Dash Of Seasoning
    Vintage Images / Getty Images A waiter fills numerous salt and pepper shakers, 1950

    Salt isn’t technically a food in itself, but it makes so many foods taste so much better that we couldn’t leave it off the list. Plus, its history is one of the longest, most interesting food stories out there, dating all the way back to the days when, as TIME put it in 1982, “animals wore paths to salt licks [and] men followed.” Salt was, eventually, one of the pillars of civilization:

    Not only did salt serve to flavor and preserve food, it made a good antiseptic, which is why the Roman word for these salubrious crystals (sal) is a first cousin to Salus, the goddess of health. Of all the roads that led to Rome, one of the busiest was the Via Salaria, the salt route, over which Roman soldiers marched and merchants drove oxcarts full of the precious crystals up the Tiber from the salt pans at Ostia. A soldier’s pay—consisting in part of salt—came to be known as solarium argentum, from which we derive the word salary. A soldier’s salary was cut if he “was not worth his salt,” a phrase that came into being because the Greeks and Romans often bought slaves with salt.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Salt

  • Barbecue

    The American Barbecue In Rowley
    Boston Globe / Getty Images Memphis ribs and Texas smoked sausage with two sides at The American BBQ Restaurant in Rowley, Mass.

    Though the word “barbecue” is misapplied to all manner of grilled meats, it actually refers to a specific process (indirect heat, slow cooking) and comes from a specific tradition:

    No one is really sure where the term barbecue originated. The conventional wisdom is that the Spanish, upon landing in the Caribbean, used the word barbacoa to refer to the natives’ method of slow-cooking meat over a wooden platform. By the 19th century, the culinary technique was well established in the American South, and because pigs were prevalent in the region, pork became the primary meat at barbecues.

    Eventually, barbecue separated into several regional styles with their own preferences for meats and flavors.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Barbecue

  • Leftovers

    LEFTOVERS FREEZER
    Bob Fila—MCT / Getty Images Leftovers in a freezer

    So, you run out and make or buy all these foods, now that they’re on your mind, but there’s no way you can eat them all right away. Which brings us to leftovers. It’s not as if someone had to “invent” the idea of saving what remains at the end of a meal—after all, in the pre-modern feast-and-famine cycle, saving the fruit of the harvest was a matter of life and death. But that doesn’t mean that the look of leftovers hasn’t changed over the years. Thanks, largely, to refrigeration:

    According to Dupont, which later invented the coolant Freon, ice was harvested where it formed naturally — including from New York City’s rivers — and shipped to the South, all in the name of food storage. In the 1840s, a Florida physician named John Gorrie, trying to cool the rooms where patients were suffering from yellow fever, figured out how to make ice using mechanical refrigeration, paving the way for household refrigerators that appeared in American homes en masse in the 1920s and 1930s. It wasn’t a moment too soon. As families struggled to feed their children during the Great Depression, it was unthinkable to throw away leftovers.

    Read the full story here: A Brief History of Leftovers

TIME HIV/AIDS

A Woman Born HIV-Positive Is in Remission Despite Stopping Treatment Years Ago

475180273
Science Stills/Visuals Unlimited, Inc./Getty Images

Doctors believe early rather than continuous treatment with antiretrovirals is key

The first case of a woman in long-term HIV remission despite not receiving treatment for many years has been documented in France.

The 18-year-old was HIV-positive at birth and given antiretroviral drugs as a child, but her family decided to cease the treatment when she reached the age of 6. Twelve years have passed and today her viral load is too low to be measured. Doctors can’t figure out why the women’s HIV has stalled.

“With this first, highly documented case of this young woman, we provide the proof of concept that long-term remission is possible in children, as in adults,” Dr. Asier Sáez-Cirión, from the Institute Pasteur in Paris, told the BBC.

“However, these cases are still very rare,” he said.

Some experts believe that early treatment is the key to future remission, but large-scale studies still need to be conducted to nail down this theory.

Although there is still much to learn, predicting HIV remission has been the subject of studies in the past. Sáez-Cirión previously led a research group of 14 patients who had no sign of the virus re-emerging after coming off antiretroviral drugs. Thirteen years passed and the patients’ viral loads remained low.

[BBC]

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