TOPSHOT - Clouds cover the mountains of Petion Ville rain fall in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince, on October 3, 2016. Hurricane Matthew has left one person dead and another missing in Haiti, officials said Monday, as it churns through the Caribbean as the worst storm in nearly a decade. / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR RETAMALHECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images
Clouds cover the mountains of Petion Ville in Port-au-Prince, on Oct. 3, 2016.Hector Retamal—AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - Clouds cover the mountains of Petion Ville rain fall in the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince, on October 3, 2016. Hurricane Matthew has left one person dead and another missing in Haiti, officials said Monday, as it churns through the Caribbean as the worst storm in nearly a decade. / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR RETAMALHECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images
People walk on a street next to destroyed houses after Hurricane Matthew hit Jeremie, Haiti, October 6, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A woman crosses over a water canal after Hurricane Matthew passes Cite-Soleil in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, October 5, 2016. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins
Haitian people cross the river La Digue in Petit Goave where the bridge collapsed during the rains of the Hurricane Matthew, southwest of Port-au-Prince, October 5, 2016. Haiti and the eastern tip of Cuba -- blasted by Matthew on October 4, 2016 -- began the messy and probably grim task of assessing the storm's toll. Matthew hit them as a Category Four hurricane but has since been downgraded to three, on a scale of five, by the US National Hurricane Center. / AFP PHOTO / HECTOR RETAMALHECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images
Wind brought by Hurricane Matthew blow palm trees on Paradise Island in Nassau, Bahamas, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. The head of the Bahamas National Emergency Management Authority, Capt. Stephen Russell, said there were many downed trees and power lines, but no reports of casualties. (AP Photo/Tim Aylen)
People stand on the coast watching the surf produced by Hurricane Matthew, on the outskirts of Kingston, Jamaica, Monday, Oct. 3, 2016. A hurricane warning is in effect for Jamaica, Haiti, and the Cuban provinces of Guantanamo, Santiago de Cuba, Holguin, Granma and Las Tunas - as well as the southeastern Bahamas. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)
Jorge Luis Azahares, 52, waits for his wife to arrive with food, amid the ruins of his home destroyed by Hurricane Matthew, in Baracoa, Cuba, Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016. Matthew hit Cuba's lightly populated eastern tip Tuesday night, damaging hundreds of homes in the easternmost city of Baracoa but there were no reports of deaths. Nearly 380,000 people were evacuated and measures were taken to protect infrastructure. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
Keith Paseur, right, and Pat Barlow survey a flooded street from Hurricane Matthew as they check on a neighbor riding out the storm in their store in downtown Brunswick, Ga., Friday, Oct. 7, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
A flooded Exchange Club island is pictured in Jacksonville, Florida, on October 7, 2016, as hurricane Matthew passes the area. Thousands of US coastal residents who defied calls to evacuate were urged to hunker down in place Friday as deadly Hurricane Matthew powered up the southeast coast threatening widespread damage and lethal flooding. After leaving at least 400 people dead when it hammered Haiti as a ruinous Category Four hurricane, a weaker but still potent Matthew claimed its first US casualty Friday when the storm blocked first responders in central Florida from reaching a woman with a medical emergency. / AFP PHOTO / JEWEL SAMADJEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Kaleigh Black, 14, left, and Amber Olsen, 12, run for cover as a squall with rain and wind from the remnants of Hurricane Matthew pelt them as they explore the Cocoa Beach Pier on Friday, Oct. 7, 2016, in Cocoa Beach, Fla. (Douglas R. Clifford/Tampa Bay Times via AP)
An official vehicle navigates debris as it passes along Highway A1A after it was partial washed away by Hurricane Matthew, Friday, Oct. 7, 2016, in Flagler Beach, Fla. Hurricane Matthew spared Florida’s most heavily populated stretch from a catastrophic blow Friday but threatened some of the South’s most historic and picturesque cities with ruinous flooding and wind damage as it pushed its way up the coastline. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Homeowner Joe Lovece surveys the damage to the kitchen at the back of his oceanfront home after the eye of Hurricane Matthew passed Ormond Beach, Florida, U.S. October 7, 2016. Lovece rode out the storm as waves took away the room at the back of his home. REUTERS/Phelan Ebenhack TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY - RTSRB85
A portion of AIA Highway in Flagler Beach, Fla., closed on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, due to the pounding surf from Hurricane Matthew. (Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
SAVANNAH, GA - OCTOBER 8: A downed tree from Hurricane Matthew rests against a home, October 8, 2016 in Savannah, Georgia. Across the Southeast, Over 1.4 million people have lost power due to Hurricane Matthew which has been downgraded to a category 1 hurricane on Saturday morning. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
JACKSONVILLE, FL - OCTOBER 07: The steeple atop of the Morning Glory Christian Church, was toppled over by the strong winds of Hurricane Matthew, October 8, 2016 in Jacksonville, Florida. Across the Southeast, Over 1.4 million people have lost power due to Hurricane Matthew which has been downgraded to a category 1 hurricane on Saturday morning. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
A woman who identified herself as Valerie walks along flooded President Street after leaving her homeless camp after Hurricane Matthew caused flooding, Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016, in Savannah, Ga. Matthew plowed north along the Atlantic coast, flooding towns and gouging out roads in its path. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
Clouds cover the mountains of Petion Ville in Port-au-Prince, on Oct. 3, 2016.
Hector Retamal—AFP/Getty Images
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See Scenes From Hurricane Matthew's Devastating Trail of Destruction

Updated: Oct 09, 2016 1:56 PM ET

Ravaging countries along the Atlantic, from Jamaica to the East Coast of the United States, "monster" Hurricane Matthew lived up to forecasts expecting it to be the strongest hurricane of this season.

Since it first started gaining strength in the Caribbean on Sept. 29, so far it has left more than 522 dead in Haiti, the hardest hit country, and at least 14 in the U.S.

Finally stripped of hurricane status right before dawn-break on Sunday, Hurricane Matthew has caused extensive flooding and left millions without power in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. Here's a look at how the hurricane moved up the coast.

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