Bojack Horseman, Happy Endings, Twin Peaks, and Friday Night Lights.
Netflix; Richard Cartwright, ABC Photo Archives, Bill Records—Getty Images
By Eliana Dockterman
January 22, 2016

A blizzard is coming, which means you’re going to be trapped inside all weekend. But you’re all caught up on Transparent and Master of None, and you ignored your family to binge Making a Murderer over Christmas. Critical darlings like Sherlock, Veep, Mad Men? You’ve seen them all.

Do not worry! There is a show out there for you to stream this weekend. Here is a list of all those shows you’ve been meaning to watch or completely missed that are solid gold.

Read next: These Are TIME’s Most Anticipated New TV Shows of 2016


Sports Night

Sports Night.
ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images

On Hulu

Sports Night is Aaron Sorkin at the top of his game. It has all the West Wing-style walking and talking you love and none of the Newsroom-esque pompous speeches you hate. And there’s Josh Charles’ charm to boot. The only catch: the TV sports show drama was canceled after two season, so don’t get too attached.


BoJack Horseman

Bojack Horseman.
Netflix

On Netflix

You may be confused by this satirical cartoon dramedy at first. (No, they don’t ever explain why animals can talk and are living among humans.) But stick with it. The show moves beyond stoner comedy when it delves into the psychology of its protagonist, a washed up TV star (and horse) who refuses to grow up.


Catastrophe

Catastrophe.
Ed Miller—Amazon Studios

On Amazon Prime

The plot may sound a lot like Knocked Up—two people decide to try to raise a baby together after a fling ends in a pregnancy—but Catastrophe is so much more real. Rob and Sharon navigate the issues of a serious relationship in just a few months, and it’s, well, a catastrophe. (For example, Rob’s romantic proposal ends in a public urination incident.)


Black Mirror

Black Mirror.
Netflix

On Netflix

Black Mirror is like The Twilight Zone on performance enhancing drugs. The chilling, dystopian anthology series questions what technology pushed to its limit will do to humanity. It isn’t pretty, but it is fascinating. Expect major plot twists in every episode.


You're the Worst

You're the Worst.
Byron Cohen—FX

On Hulu

Just when you thought the romantic comedy genre was played out, it turns out there’s one more twist: pair two terrible people together and see what happens. Though romantic leads Jimmy and Gretchen can be sarcastic, bitter and obnoxious, they’re also hilarious. And the show turns out to be a surprisingly sweet tale of two people who absolutely deserve each other.


Veronica Mars

Veronica Mars.
Justin Lubin—Getty Images

On Amazon Prime

Before she was Sarah Marshall, Kristen Bell played a high school sleuth in this surprisingly dark, utterly addictive show with one of the best love triangles on TV. And this isn’t a case-a-week type of deal: Veronica Mars really delves into its twisted mysteries, and in the last season takes on the campus rape epidemic years before the problem finally caught the White House‘s attention.


Happy Endings

Happy Endings.
Richard Cartwright—Getty Images

On Hulu

All three seasons of this canceled-too-soon sitcom are finally available to stream. Don’t be fooled by the sextet Friends set up: This show is way wackier with way less drama. (Or as certain characters would say on Happy Endings “draaaamaaaa.”) The creator has talked about a possible reunion, so vote with your binges!


The Honorable Woman

The Honourable Woman.
SundanceTV

On Netflix

For Homeland fans fed up with Homeland, this is the Middle East espionage thriller you’ve been looking for. Maggie Gyllenhaal stars as the Jewish and British daughter of a man who dealt arms to Israel before he was murdered in front of his children. She is trying to use her money and clout to promote peace between the Israelis and Palestinians when terrorists kidnap someone close to her. A complicated plot involving politicians, spies and terrorists unravels.


Battlestar Galactica

Battlestar Galactica
Syfy—Getty Images

On Hulu

Already watched Star Wars 10 times and looking for another space opera? Battlestar Galactica is a seriously underrated drama. (Awards shows often overlook sci-fi.) The show follows the last remaining humans after an attack by a group of robots called Cylons—who, by the way, can take human form. Anyone could be a spy.


Freaks and Geeks

Freaks and Geeks.
Chris Haston—Getty Images

On Netflix

Who knew this one-season show from 1999 about high school nerds and burnouts would produce some of the most prolific and well-known comedians of the 2010s? James Franco, Seth Rogen, Jason Segel and Linda Cardellini all got their start on this critically acclaimed series from Judd Apatow and Paul Feig.


Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks.
CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images

On Netflix

The cult hit was arguably the most unusual show to ever air on network TV, and definitely the one with the most flannel (seriously, so much flannel). Twin Peaks’ presence in pop culture has lingered even decades after the show ended. David Lynch’s chilling and bizarre aesthetic has been copied by shows like True Detective and lampooned by comedies like The Simpsons. Now, it’s returning to TV this year, so here’s your chance to catch up.


Party Down

Party Down.
Starz

On Hulu

What do you do when your acting dreams fail? Become a caterer. Each episode, these wannabe actors serve up cocktail wieners at a different event, from an after party for porn awards to a young Republicans bash, to predictably hilarious ends. This show stars probably some of your favorite comedians, including Jane Lynch, Adam Scott, Ken Marino and Lizzy Caplan.


Luther

Luther.
Steffan Hill—BBC

On Netflix

To truly appreciate Idris Elba, you must see him at his best—or worst? He plays a brilliant but unhinged detective who engages in psychological duels with murderers—most notably Ruth Wilson before she starred on The Affair. Tune in for the sparks that fly between those two.


Friday Night Lights

Friday Night Lights.
Bill Records—Getty Images

On Netflix

Yes, it’s really that good. Friday Night Lights fans are seriously passionate about Dillon football and with good reason. The drama about a high school football team in Texas had a heart of gold and some unbelievable performances, particularly from Kyle Chandler as the coach, Connie Britton as his wife and, in later seasons, Michael B. Jordan as a player.

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