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Seaworld’s Profits Drop 84% After Blackfish Documentary

sea world sign
Matt Stroshane—Getty Images The sign at the entrance to SeaWorld on Feb. 24, 2010 in Orlando, Fla.

The company acknowledged ongoing "brand challenges" are at least partially to blame

Consumers are still turning their backs on SeaWorld. The embattled marine life theme park company reported steep drops in profits and attendance and on Thursday, marking more loss in the wake of the damning documentary Blackfish.

SeaWorld Entertainment has faced an 84% drop in net second-quarter income, from $37.4 million in 2014 to $5.8 million in 2015, in the second quarter. Revenue fell from $405.1 million to $391.6 million, a drop of 3%, in the second quarter of 2015 when compared to 2014.

The park saw 100,000 fewer visitors than it did at the same time in 2014, a decrease of 2%.

SeaWorld Entertainment blamed the fall in attendance on spring break tourism due to the timing of Easter, record wet weather in Texas, and what the company referred to as “brand challenges” in California. Visitors are still flocking to the SeaWorld location in Florida, on the other hand, which has been able to offset some of the lessened demand in other locations.

“We realize we have much work ahead of us to recover more of our attendance base, increase revenue and improve our performance as returning to historical performance levels will take time and investment,” SeaWorld President and CEO Joel Manby said in a statement.

The company has been struggling to maintain consumer interest in SeaWorld in the wake of Blackfish, which offered a grim look at life in captivity for Orca whales, and has launched a series of campaigns discounts to keep visitors interested.


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