TIME oregon

Oil Ship Leaves Portland After Police Force Greenpeace Protesters Off Bridge

Protesters had been attempting to block an icebreaking vessel from leaving Portland to go to the Arctic for oil drilling

An controversial oil ship managed to sail past a group of Greenpeace protesters hanging from a bridge in Portland after police and Coast Guard officers forced the activists from the area.

The protesters had gathered to block a Royal Dutch Shell icebreaking vessel from leaving the area to head to a oil drilling site in the Arctic. Environmental activists had suspended themselves from the St. Johns bridge and formed a line of kayaks along the Willamette River in an effort to block the ship from leaving the city, but the ship, named Fennica, managed to slip through a gap in the dangling protesters just before 6:00 p.m. Pacific time.

For about six hours, according to local outlets, there was relative quiet. But Thursday afternoon, the Coast Guard and local officials began insisting that the protesters move.

According to OregonLive, which hosted a liveblog of the protest, officials at one point attempted to grab kayakers—called “kayaktivists” by organizers”—using boat hooks. Some of the activists who had situated themselves in slings underneath the bridge left voluntarily, but others were still dangling from it at about 6 p.m. local time.

Earlier on Thursday, activists were involved in a standoff with the vessel and the Coast Guard during which they temporarily blocked the ship from leaving dock. According to Oregon Public Broadcasting, protesters cheered and declared victor when the vessel turned around. A judge on Thursday fined Greenpeace USA $2,500 for every hour that protesters blocked the vessel from passing through.

TIME Foreign Policy

Obama Rallies Grassroots to Get ‘Active’ in Iran Deal Organizing

Obama told participants in a conference call to get more active in their efforts to garner support for the Iran deal

President Obama told grassroots organizers on a conference call Thursday to “get moving” on efforts to make their support for the Iran deal known to members of Congress.

“You guys have to get more active and loud and involved and informed,” Obama said on conference call Thursday.

Obama challenged the organizers to take an approach opposite what organizers took when Congress was mulling whether or not to authorize the Iraq War. His frustration with that effort, he said, was in the fact that everyone got “loud and active when it was too late.”

As Congress leaves for its summer recess, the Iran Deal will likely be a major topic of discussion at town halls and meetings in their districts

Obama’s strategy hit home with at least one organizer on the call, who spoke to TIME shortly after it ended.

“The still-raw memories of the Iraq war are the single motivating factor for those of us who are pushing for the deal,” says Ben Wikler, the Washington Director for MoveOn.org, who joined the call Thursday. MoveOn.org was one of the most active groups calling for diplomacy, not war in Iraq following the September 11 terrorist attacks.

According to the White House a wide-cross section of progressive groups were invited to join the call. At the outset, Obama thanked groups including MoveOn.org, the Truman National Security Project, and Organizing for Action for their support thus far on the nuclear deal with Iran. Wikler said it was “heartening” to hear directly from the President and to know that the White House is “pulling out all the stops” to ensure that the diplomatic agreement over Iran’s nuclear program comes into fruition.

“It makes all the difference in the world if you’re calling Congress, and attending town halls to know that there are people on your side,” Wikler says.

Wikler compared the tone of the call to one that could be experienced during an election season—Obama was forceful, direct, and adamant that the his bully pulpit alone won’t see the deal through a skeptical Congress. Wikler says his organization has a similar sense of urgency around the deal, which he says is their “overriding priority” leading up to the vote.

Thursday’s call made clear that the White House is leaving nothing on the table in its effort to garner support for the historic deal over Iran’s nuclear program. Members of the Obama administration have been actively lobbying Congress over the pending deal since it was announced on July 14. Cabinet members are making regular appearances on Capitol Hill and just Wednesday a group of House Democrats attended a working reception at the White House where the Iran deal was discussed.

Despite the White House efforts, opponents of the deal remain relentless in their efforts to block it and a hefty coalition of Congressional leaders are insistent upon keeping it from passing. Congress was given 60 days to either approve or reject the deal, though Obama has said he would veto any attempt to block it.

TIME

Former University of Cincinnati Cop Pays Bond And Is Released From Jail

Ray Tensing
John Minchillo—AP Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing appears at Hamilton County Courthouse for his arraignment in the shooting death of motorist Samuel DuBose on July 30, 2015, in Cincinnati.

Former university police officer Ray Tensing reportedly left the jail Thursday evening

The former University of Cincinnati police officer charged in the shooting death of an unarmed black man is out of jail on bond.

Ray Tensing posted 10 percent of his $1 million bail—just over $100,000—on Thursday evening, according to the Hamilton County Clerk’s office, not long after pleading not guilty to murder and involuntary manslaughter in the shooting death of 43-year-old Sam DuBose.

Representatives from the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department told the Cincinnati television station WCPO that the 25-year-old officer left the jail at about 6:45 p.m. on Thursday. TIME could not immediately reach the office for comment. Tensing’s lawyer, Stewart Mathews, said Thursday that people across the United States were offering to help pay Tensing’s bond.

The former campus cop was indicted Wednesday in the shooting death of DuBose, who the officer said he was “forced to shoot” in an initial report that alleged the unarmed man had attempted to run the officer over after failing to meet the officer’s request to produce his license.

The local prosecutor, however, felt a recently released body-camera video told a different story. In it, the officer can be seen shooting DuBose in the head and then falling backward. The Hamilton County prosecutor called the shooting the “most asinine act that I’ve ever seen a police officer make.”

Tensing’s lawyer maintains that there are “two sides” to the story. “The case will be tried and decided in court,” Mathews said.

DuBose is one of 669 people who have been killed by police so far in 2015, according to a database by the Guardian newspaper, and 175 of those killed have been black.

 

TIME

U.S. Psychologists Group Could Soon Ban Involvement in Terrorism Interrogations

The American Psychological Association is reportedly considering a new ethics policy that could prohibit psychologists from helping to question terror suspects

A national psychologists group could soon adopt new ethics rules that would ban its members from participating in the questioning of terror suspects.

The New York Times reports the board of the American Psychological Association is considering a new ethics policy that would effectively prohibit psychologists from assisting in all national security investigations. A decision on whether or not the group will approve the policy could come as soon as next week.

The potential ban would come in the wake of a report that purported to detail how APA officials worked in collaboration with the Bush Administration to carry out and justify the government’s controversial interrogation program. According to the Times, the change in policy could hinder the Obama administration’s ability to hold and question some individuals suspected of terrorism.

Read more at the New York Times.

TIME 2016 Election

Donald Trump Promises to be ‘Nice’ at GOP Debate

Britain Women's Golf Open
Scott Heppell—AP Presidential contender Donald Trump looks on at the 16th green on the 1st first day of the Women's British Open golf championship on the Turnberry golf course in Turnberry, Scotland on July 30, 2015.

"It is certainly my intention to be very nice & highly respectful of the other candidates," Trump tweeted Thursday

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump promises he’ll play nice at next week’s debate. The business mogul tweeted Thursday that he is looking forward to the debate that will feature the 10 candidates with the highest average across national polls. The latest Quinnipiac poll showed Trump leading the pack among Republican presidential contenders.

Though Trump promises to keep things civil, as TIME’s Zeke Miller and Philip Elliott reported Thursday, Republican campaigns are mulling what tactics they’ll deploy when their candidates face off against the bombastic businessman next Thursday.

“It’s drilling down and getting into specifics of policy,” one strategist told them. “You can show that not only the emperor has no clothes—the candidate has no answers.”

Read more about how Republicans are preparing here.

 

TIME

Watch These Adorable Baby Lions Take Tiny Little Baby Steps

Awwwwww

What do you get when you put four newborn lion cubs in a basket and record their antics? One adorable video.

The baby white lions were born in a zoo in Crimea recently and although they can hardly walk or stay awake, they are quite adept at stealing hearts. We let out an “awwwwww” for you in advance.

Watch their cuddly antics below.

 

TIME Planned Parenthood

Activists Release Fourth Planned Parenthood Video

Planned Parenthood President Feldt
Mario Tama—Getty Images

The video shows a Colorado-based doctor

A group of anti-abortion activists released another video featuring a Planned Parenthood representative talking about fetal tissue donations.

The fourth video released by the Center for Medical Progress shows Colorado-based Dr. Savita Ginde discussing and later demonstrating the procurement of fetal tissue. In the video,which was secretly recorded, Ginde can also be seen discussing reimbursement costs.

A Los Angeles court had issued a temporary restraining order against the group from releasing any further footage surreptitiously taken of officials with a California company, but the new video was recorded in Colorado and is not affected by that order.

The video was produced in an the same vein as three others released by the group which claim Planned Parenthood is involved in the illegal sale of fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood, however, has repeatedly denied that is the case. In an op-ed for the Washington Post Wednesday responding to the other videos, Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards apologized for the tone used by employees featured in them, but said they show nothing illegal.

“While predictably these videos do not show anything illegal on Planned Parenthood’s part, medical and scientific conversations can be upsetting to hear, and I immediately apologized for the tone that was used, which did not reflect the compassion that people have come to know and expect from Planned Parenthood,” Richards wrote.

The release of the video came Thursday as the Senate sought to vote to defund the medical services provider, though the measure is unlikely to pass a key legislative hurdle.

TIME Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton Criticizes Proposals to Defund Planned Parenthood

Secretary Hillary Clinton tours the DART Central Station, before taking questions from journalists, to highlight her climate change policy announcement, in Des Moines, Iowa on Monday, July 27, 2015.
The Washington Post—The Washington Post/Getty Images Secretary Hillary Clinton tours the DART Central Station, before taking questions from journalists, to highlight her climate change policy announcement, in Des Moines, Iowa on Monday, July 27, 2015.

Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton may agree with Republicans that recent undercover videos taken of Planned Parenthood employees are disturbing, but she disagrees with what they want to do next.

Speaking to reporters after a meeting with AFL-CIO leaders in Silver Spring, Maryland, Clinton said the organization has “provided essential service for women in our country” for more than a century.

“I think it is regrettable that Republicans are once again trying to undermine, even end those services that so many women have needed and taken advantage of,” she said. “I think that it’s another effort by the Republicans to try to limit the health care options of women and we should not let them succeed once again.”

The Center for Medical Progress released several secretly recorded videos this month showing Planned Parenthood officials discussing fetal tissue extraction and the costs involved. Republicans have alleged that the videos show the organization is illegally selling fetal parts and called for publicly defunding the group. Planned Parenthood has defended itself, saying it only receives reimbursements for associated costs, which is allowed.

Eighteen House Republicans have already said they will not support any government funding resolutions this fall that contain any funding for Planned Parenthood. Under the long-standing Hyde Amendment, none of the federal money that goes to Planned Parenthood can be spent on abortions.

On Tuesday, Clinton told the New Hampshire Union Leader that she had seen pictures from the videos and found them “disturbing,” adding that they raise broader questions about the process of fetal tissue donation.

TIME Science

Scientists Identify Long-Lost Remains of Early Virginia Settlers

A stone cross marking the grave of a 17t
Mladen Antonov—AFP/Getty Images A stone cross marking the grave of a 17th-century British settler is seen at the archaeological site of Jamestown, Va., on November 22, 2011.

The bodies were buried in the 17th century

Scientists used technology to identify the remains of four early residents of Jamestown, Va., the first permanent English settlement in what would become the United States.

The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation at Historic Jamestowne and the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History announced on Tuesday that the settlers lived—and held high positions—in early English America as far back at 1608. About 100 people settled along the James River in what would become the first English settlement in 1607. The colony, however, was nearly wiped out due to conflict—with Native Americans in the area and with each other—as well as famine and disease. Among the identified remains were those of Rev. Robert Hunt, Jamestown’s first Anglican minister, and Captain Gabriel Archer, a leader among the early settlers and a rival of Captain John Smith. The remaining two, Sir Ferdinando Wainman and Captian William West, were relatives of the governor Lorde De La Warr.

Archeologists with Jamestown Rediscovery have been working to identify the remains since they were found in November of 2013. Scientists from both the Smithsonian and the Rediscovery Foundation examined artifacts from the graves, forensic evidence and technology like CT scans to determine who they were. (There’s a video explaining how here, on their website.) The discovery of the burial site, however, dates back to 2010 when Jamestown Rediscovery uncovered what the organization says is the earliest known Protestant Church in North America. Within that church— in the chancel, considered the holiest part of the building—scientists found the four burial sites that held the remains of these early settlers.

“This is an extraordinary discovery, one of the most important of recent times,” said James Horn, President of the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation, in a press release. “These men were among the first founders of English America. They lived and died at a critical time in the history of the settlement — when Jamestown was on the brink of failure owing to food shortages, disease, and conflict with powerful local Indian peoples, the Powhatans.”

The church they were buried in is significant, too. According to Jamestown Rediscovery, Pocahontas and John Rolfe were married there.

TIME justice

Obama Administration Could Expand Pell Grant Eligibility to Prisoners

Arne Duncan Obama prisoners pell grants
Brendan Smialowski—AFP/Getty Images Secretary of Education Arne Duncan with President Obama at the White House, in March 2015.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan hinted recently that administration is “developing experimental sites” that would make Pell Grants available to prisoners

The Obama administration could soon unveil a plan that would make federal college grants available to prisoners.

On Monday, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan hinted during a policy speech that the administration is “developing experimental sites” that would, among other things, make Pell Grants available to “incarcerated adults seeking an independent, productive life after they get out of jail.”

The Wall Street Journal reports the announcement could come as soon as Friday, when Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch are slated to make a joint appearance at a prison in Maryland on Friday.

The move would be the latest attempt by the Obama administration to provide opportunities to prisoners that could help reduce the national recidivism rate. According to Inside Higher Ed, six House Democrats introduced a bill in May that would expand Pell Grant eligibility to those behind bars. Congress blocked prisoners from Pell Grant eligibility in the 1990s.

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