Visitors head to Red Rocks to get in a workout and to visit the rocks, Creation, Ship Rock and Stage Rock, on Aug 4, 2015, in Morrison, Colo.
John Leyba—The Denver Post via Getty Images
By Jack Linshi
August 4, 2015

Colorado’s Red Rocks Park, famed for its amphitheater and naturalistic landscape design, has been named a national historic landmark, the National Park Service announced on Tuesday.

The status also extends to the nearby Mount Morrison Civilian Conservation Corps Camp, where New Deal-era workers stayed while working on the Red Rocks Amphitheater, where thousands have gathered to listen to performers including The Beatles and Sting, the Denver Post reports.

“This designation reinforces Red Rocks Park and its remarkable landscape of red sandstone monoliths as a true icon for Colorado,” Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said in a statement. “The Mount Morrison CCC camp is another historical treasure in the park, and one of the few surviving camps in the nation.”

The park’s amphitheater regularly big-name acts, including prior shows by The Beatles and The Grateful Dead.

Colorado has 25 designated national historic landmarks, including Red Rocks.

[Denver Post]

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