TIME Media

See How Badly Television Is Doing When It Comes to Diversity

These charts show that the people who make television shows remain overwhelmingly white and male

This year’s Oscars was slammed for the nominees’ lack of diversity—and now the small-screen is coming under fire, too.

Over the last 13 TV seasons, staff writers have continued to be mostly white and male, according to an annual report on TV staffing from the the Writers Guild of America. That trend continues in the face of the rise of showrunners like Scandal‘s Shonda Rhimes, Girls‘ Lena Dunham and Transparent‘s Jill Soloway.

WGA has amassed over a decade’s worth of data from its annual briefs, giving us a picture of how gender and racial diversity has changed—or remained unchanged—over time. Take a look:

 

The report, which surveyed 2,724 writers on 292 TV shows during the 2013-2014 season, shows that 29% of TV writers during that period were female, a 2.2% increase over the last 12 years. Meanwhile, 13.7% of writers were non-white, a 4.9% increase over the last 12 years. For comparison, 50.7% of Americans are female, and 22.3% of Americans are non-white, according to the latest U.S. Census data.

“In fact, women and minorities have lost a little ground relative to their male and white counterparts since the WGA’s last report, both in terms of overall staff positions and in the all-important executive producer ranks,” writes report author University of California, Los Angeles sociology professor Darnell Hunt. “Indeed, research is beginning to confirm the common-sense notion that increasingly diverse audiences desire more diverse storytelling.”

 

TIME Gadgets

You Won’t Get Your Hands on Apple’s Giant iPad Any Time Soon

Apple iPad Tablet Suppliers
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images Apple CEO Tim Cook holds the new iPad Air 2 during a special event on Oct. 16, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Apple has reportedly told suppliers to delay until the second half of 2015

Bad news for those awaiting Apple’s rumored 12.9-inch iPad — you’ll have to wait even longer.

Apple has told suppliers to delay the iPad’s mass production from the first quarter of 2015 to the second half of the year, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday, citing people familiar with the matter. Apple hasn’t officially announced the bigger iPad, which would be its largest ever, but several leaks from the supply chain have suggested since last fall that the “iPad Air Plus” or “iPad Pro” is in the works.

The delay will reportedly allow Apple more time to finalize the iPad’s design, which may include USB ports and better synchronization software as Apple tries to break into the fast-growing enterprise market.

Apple’s tablet sales have struggled lately, with 2014 marking the first year in which worldwide iPad shipments declined, according to a report by IDC. But it’s not just Apple: the global tablet market has seen a “massive deceleration” in growth as big-screen smartphones cannibalize tablet sales, IDC said. In other words, the number of tablets shipped worldwide is still going up—but less and less each year.

Here’s a closer look at IDC’s tablet market forecast:

iCharts

[WSJ]

TIME 2016 Election

Everything We Know About Hillary Clinton’s Email

And what we don't know

The new political headache afflicting Hillary Clinton is all about email.

The New York Times reported Monday that the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate had exclusively used a private email account for her government business during her tenure as Secretary of State, rather than a government email account. And an Associated Press report Wednesday said Clinton used her own email servers, rather than a third-party provider like Gmail or Yahoo Mail. That’s raised questions about whether Clinton was making a deliberate attempt to prevent her messages from being disclosed by open records requests or subpoenas.

Clinton’s campaign has said she followed both “letter and spirit of the rules,” but the snafu has played into Republican criticisms of her as secretive and politically calculating. Clinton tried to contain the damage in a tweet late Wednesday saying she supports the release of more emails.

Here’s everything to know about the controversy.

Wait. What’s the big deal?

A top U.S. diplomat working only on a personal email account raises an obvious question: Did Clinton stay off government email to hide something? Federal regulations are meant to prevent a situation in which officials, by keeping emails “off the record,” could thwart information requests made by the public or the government. When Clinton took office in 2009, federal rules required that government employees using a non-government email account “must ensure that Federal records sent or received on such systems are preserved in the appropriate agency recordkeeping system.” (It was only last year, one year after Clinton’s tenure had ended, that President Obama signed a explicitly limiting U.S. officials’ use of private email accounts for business matters.) But Clinton aides are the only ones who have determined what amounts to official correspondence and what doesn’t, and others might come to different conclusions.

Did Clinton break the law?

Probably not, but we’re still in a legal grey area. The Federal Records Act—passed in November, after Clinton left the State Department—requires government officials’ emails that are sent from personal account to be forwarded to an official account within 20 days. But during Clinton’s tenure, it was never explicitly required that top-level officials like Clinton use government-issued accounts. “What she did was not technically illegal,” Patrice McDermott, a former National Archives staffer and the head of the transparency group Open The Government coalition, told The Hill newspaper. But, she said, “it was highly inappropriate and it was inappropriate for the State Department to let this happen.”

Because her official emails were sequestered on her private email address, much of her correspondence was not openly available via the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which gives the public right to access information from the federal government.

Will we ever see Clinton’s official emails? Or have they simply disappeared?

Clinton’s team turned over more than 50,000 pages of emails from her personal email account to the State Department late last year, when the Federal Records Act was passed, at the department’s request.

How do we know that she turned over all required emails?

We don’t. For several years, media outlets have filed requests for Clinton’s official correspondences during her tenure under FOIA. These requests have remained unreturned or unfulfilled, though the State Department has acknowledged their receipt. Theoretically, all of Clinton’s emails concerning government matters during her tenure fall under FOIA’s domain—but they are inaccessible if they were sent between Clinton’s private account and a third-party agency, such as a nonprofit foundation or a private consultancy. Clinton would need to provide these emails herself.

Have other U.S. officials used private email accounts?

Yes. Several officials in the Bush Administration, such as Karl Rove, were heavily criticized for using personal e-mail accounts to send emails from the White House. While Clinton herself has not commented on the situation, Nick Merrill, a Clinton spokesman, noted that former Secretaries of State in both parties had also used their own email accounts when engaging with U.S. officials.

Were they punished?

We don’t know. There haven’t been reports outlining specific repercussions against those officials who used private accounts for business emails. The White House has repeatedly made its e-mail policy clear each time the issue arises. “Very specific guidance has been given to agencies all across the government, which is specifically that employees in the Obama administration should use their official e-mail accounts when they’re conducting official government business,” White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest said Wednesday.

How much do high-ranking officials like Clinton really use email?

It varies. Janet Napolitano, the former Secretary of Homeland Security, was known for never using email at all. It’s unclear exactly how often Clinton emailed, but certainly enough for her team to turn over 50,000 pages worth of emails. During her time as Secretary of State she was often spotted looking down at her BlackBerry—the image of her doing so in sunglasses inspired a Texts from Hillary meme.

So what Internet service did she use?

Clinton used a private email server registered back to her family’s home in Chappaqua, N.Y., the AP reports. That means she or someone working for her physically ran her own email, giving her wide-ranging control over her message archives. It also could have made her emails more vulnerable to hackers or physical disasters like fires or floods. The Secret Service would have been able to protect an email server in Clinton’s home from physical theft, however.

Clinton reconfigured her email account in November 2012 to use Google servers as a backup . Five months after she resigned as Secretary of State, her email server was reconfigured again, switching her backup provider to a Denver-based email provider called MX Logic.

Who’s this Eric Hoteham figure?

Eric Hoteham is the mysterious name associated with Clinton’s private server account. But no public records of “Eric Hoteham” appear to exist, and the name wasn’t found in campaign contribution records or elsewhere, the AP reports. Politico reported on Wednesday that Hoteham is a Washington stockbroker and former aide to the Clintons.

What email address did she use?

One of her private email addresses was hrd22@clintonemail.com. HRD appears to stand for her premarital initials (Hillary Diane Rodham, as opposed to now Hillary Rodham Clinton). But it’s unclear what the 22 is for. She was sworn in on Feb. 2—or 2/2.

Read next: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Using Personal Email at Work

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Apple watch

See How Your Favorite Apps Will Look on the Apple Watch

Apple Watch Apps WatchAware
Justin Sullivan—Getty Images The new Apple Watch is displayed during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on Sept. 9, 2014 in Cupertino, Calif.

Get a sneak peek before Apple dishes more Apple Watch info

Can’t wait to get your Apple Watch? A new website is making it easier to pass the time until the device’s April release.

WatchAware has rounded up mockups of over 20 Apple Watch apps, allowing you to get an interactive feel of how each app might look on the device. Most of the mockups are Apple fans’ best guesses at what the apps will look like, but others—like Twitter and Facebook—are the official app designs as shown during the Apple Watch’s unveiling last fall.

More information about the Apple Watch will likely be revealed during Apple’s March 9 event, which is expected to focus on how apps function on the device.

TIME Food & Drink

The Cruffin Is the New, More Delicious Version of the Cronut

Cruffin Foxcroft & Ginger
Foxcroft & Ginger

Heaven on earth

The latest competitor to Dominique Ansel’s cronut has arrived.

London artisan bakery Foxcroft & Ginger will start selling on Friday the “cruffin,” a hybrid croissant-donut pastry, Business Insider reported Wednesday. The cruffins are hand-folded in-house with French butter and a “secret sourdough mix,” and then baked into a muffin shape with fillings such as chocolate ganache, custard and jam.

Foxcroft & Ginger isn’t the first to unveil the cruffin, though. Mr. Holmes Bakehouse in San Francisco, for example, already has its own cruffin, and it’s so popular the bakery says someone may have stolen their recipe. Other outlets have tried to cash in on the hybrid pastry craze, with chains like Dunkin’ Donuts offering a croissant-donut pastry.

[Business Insider]

 

TIME Education

Virginia Women’s College to Close Due to ‘Insurmountable’ Financial Challenges

Sweet Briar College on Oct. 25, 2006 in Sweet Briar, Virginia.
Charles Ommanney—Getty Images Sweet Briar College on Oct. 25, 2006 in Sweet Briar, Virginia.

Amid declining interest in single-sex higher education

Sweet Briar College, a private women’s college in rural Virginia, announced Tuesday it will close in August due to “insurmountable financial challenges.”

The school’s board of directors came to the decision after a year-long study concluded there was no viable way for the women’s college to continue its operations, the Richmond Times-Dispatch reports. The college’s president, James F. Jones, said the school had been offering tuition discounts to buffer against decreasing enrollment, as interest in single-sex education declines, and as small liberal arts colleges continue to face financial pressures.

According to the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Sweet Briar enrolled 700 women this year, 93 fewer than two years ago.

“The liberal arts college sector is embattled now on so many different fronts,” Jones told the Times-Dispatch. “The diversity of American higher education—the fact that there are so many different schools of all sorts of hues—is really imperiled right now.”

Sweet Briar will provide an on-campus college fair to help students in the transfer process, while also offering assistance to students admitted to Sweet Briar for this fall.

[Richmond Times-Dispatch]

TIME Retail

Target to Cut ‘Several Thousand’ Jobs Over the Next 2 Years

A sign for a Target store is seen in the Chicago suburb of Evanston, Illinois on Feb. 10, 2015.
Jim Young—Reuters A sign for a Target store is seen in the Chicago suburb of Evanston, Illinois on Feb. 10, 2015.

The company is restructuring to save $2 billion

Target announced on Tuesday that it plans to cut “several thousand” jobs over the next two years as part of the retail giant’s restructuring and $2 billion savings plan.

The Minneapolis-based company, which employs 350,000 people globally and has roughly 1,800 box stores, said in a statement it will eliminate the positions while creating “centralized teams based on specialized expertise.”

“The restructuring will be concentrated at Target’s headquarters locations and focus on driving leaner, more efficient capabilities, removing the complexity and allowing the organization to move with greater speed and agility,” the statement continued.

The savings are intended to drive sales and earnings growth as the company recovers from the 2007-08 financial crisis and a major data breach in late 2013, while investing heavily in technology to improve its e-commerce offerings.

TIME Law

Tamir Rice’s Family Says Cleveland’s Response to Lawsuit Is ‘Very Disrespectful’

The city's response blamed the boy's death partly on his failure to avoid injury

The family of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old boy fatally shot by a Cleveland police officer in November, said Tuesday they felt disrespected by the city’s response to a lawsuit over his death.

The city’s response, filed on Friday, had blamed the boy’s death partly on his own actions, stating it had been caused “by the failure … to exercise due care to avoid injury.”

“The city’s answer was very disrespectful to my son, Tamir,” Samaria Rice, the boy’s mother, said at a news conference alongside attorneys, according to Cleveland.com. “I have yet not received an apology from the police department or the city of Cleveland in regards to the killing of my son. And it hurts.”

The family’s attorney, Walter Madison, said the response as written places an adult-like responsibility on children. Cleveland officials have remained mostly silent about the lawsuit, aside from Mayor Frank Jackson, who on Monday apologized for the way the response’s phrasing made it seem like the boy was at fault over his own death.

Rice was killed Nov. 22 after officers responded to reports of someone in a park with a gun, shooting him less than two seconds after their arrival. The boy was later found to have been holding a pellet gun.

[Cleveland.com]

TIME technology

New Report Says Apple Is Now the World’s Biggest Smartphone Maker

Apple Samsung Sales
Chris McGrath—Getty Images The Apple iPhone 6 and 6 Plus at their launch at the Apple Omotesando Store on Sept. 19, 2014 in Tokyo, Japan.

According to data from research firm Gartner

Apple is now the world’s biggest smartphone maker in terms of worldwide sales at the end of last year, according to a new estimate that puts its fourth quarter figures ahead of rival Samsung’s numbers.

While Apple reported worldwide sales of 74.8 million smartphones during the fourth quarter of 2014, a report by research firm Gartner published Tuesday estimates Samsung sold 73 million units during the same period. If accurate — Samsung doesn’t report out its smartphone sales — that would mean Apple overtook Samsung as the world’s top smartphone maker by global sales for the first time since late 2011.

The new figures come on the heels of a recent report by Strategy Analytics that said Apple tied Samsung in worldwide shipments during the fourth quarter, which includes sold and unsold smartphones.

Apple’s strongest sales tend to occur during Q4 due to its fall iPhone releases. Last year’s iPhone 6 and 6 Plus offered the sales push Apple needed to beat out Samsung, per Gartner’s data:

But Apple still has a ways to go if it wants to beat Samsung in annual global smartphone sales — a goal that seems possible given how Apple’s annual sales are rising faster than Samsung’s:

Here’s a look at the history of Apple’s iPhone:

TIME Money

Here Are the Most Expensive Places to Book a Hotel in the U.S.

Most Expensive CIties to Stay In
Stan Badz—US PGA Tour A course scenic shot at sunrise on the 17th hole during the first round of the Sony Open in Hawaii at Waialae Country Club on January 9, 2014 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

From Butte, Montana., to Panama City, Florida

Planning a spring trip within the United States? You might want to budget a bit more money for a hotel.

The 20 most expensive American cities to stay in are surprisingly scattered across the nation, from Butte, Montana, to Panama City, Florida, according to Hotel.com’s Hotel Price Index, which ranked U.S. metro areas by average nightly hotel prices.

Honolulu, Hawaii, tops the list ($236), with New York, New York, in second ($221), and Boston, Massachusetts, and Miami, Florida tied for third ($187).

Click on the map below to take a closer look at all 20 cities:

For other rankings based on hotel prices, check out Hotel Price Index’s full report.

 

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser