Donald Trump Says He Didn't Expect Response to Immigration Comments to Be 'Quite This Severe'

Jul 05, 2015

Business mogul and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said Saturday that he wasn't expecting such harsh corporate backlash to his incendiary comments about Mexican immigrants.

Trump, who lost a string of business partners after saying that Mexican immigrants are "bringing drugs, bringing crime, they’re rapists," conceded during a Fox News interview that he "didn't know it was going to be quite this severe, but I really knew it was going to be bad."

Among those who have cut ties with the billionaire include Macy's, NBC Universal, Ora TV, Serta and Univision, the last of which Trump has sued for $500 million after the Spanish-language network cancelled plans to air the July 12 Miss USA pageant. Some other GOP candidates, including Marco Rubio, himself the son of immigrants from Cuba, have blasted Trump for his "offensive and divisive" comments.

The real estate mogul continued to voice his controversial views this week, when a young woman was gunned down at a San Francisco tourist spot in an apparent random shooting by a suspect whom police said is an undocumented immigrant.

"We have many cases like this, but nobody wants to talk about it," Trump said of the incident. "It seems like I'm sort a whipping post because I bring it up."

LIFE's Best Convention Photos: The GOP

Scene at the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.
Scene at the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.Ralph Crane—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Scene at the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.
Scene at the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.
Go-go girl and delegates during the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.
Arizona politician and future U.S. Attorney General Richard Kleindienst (left) confers with Nebraska's Richard Herman during the 1964 GOP National Convention in San Francisco.
Ronald Reagan at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco.
Scene during the 1960 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
Not originally published in LIFE. During the 1960 Republican National Convention in Chicago, Martin Luther King Jr. leads a demonstration calling for a strong Civil Rights plank in the GOP campaign platform.
Scene during the 1960 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
Scene during the 1960 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
Scene at the 1956 Republican National Convention, San Francisco, California.
Left to right: President Dwight D. Eisenhower, his wife Mamie, Richard M. Nixon and his wife, Pat, at the 1956 GOP National Convention, San Francisco, California.
Scene at the 1956 Republican National Convention, San Francisco.
Chairman of the Republican National Committee Arthur E. Summerfield on the telephone during the 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Control booth, 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Bertha Baur, a prominent figure at conventions for decades and a long-time member of the Republican National Committee, in an elephant hat at the 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Pennsylvania Governor John Fine (left) and Arthur Summerfield chat in private during the 1952 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
Republicans hold an informal conference in a kitchen during the 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Vice-presidential nominee Richard Nixon and his wife Pat talk with photographers during the 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Scene at the 1952 GOP National Convention in Chicago.
Scene at the 1948 GOP National Convention in Philadelphia.
Scene at the 1948 GOP National Convention in Philadelphia.
Pennsylvania delegates to the 1944 Republican National Convention in Chicago pull cold beers from a tub of ice after a caucus meeting.
Delegates listen to Herbert Hoover during the 1944 Republican National Convention in Chicago.
A model wears a bathing suit in a fashion show at Ohio senator Robert Taft's headquarters during the 1940 GOP National Convention in Philadelphia.
A young Republican rests on a sofa in the Hotel Adelphi during the 1940 GOP National Convention in Philadelphia. ("Van" is Sen. Arthur Vandenberg of Michigan, long considered a front-runner for the GOP nomination; instead, the Republicans nominated Indiana's Wendell Willkie, who lost the election to the Democratic incumbent, FDR.)
Scene at the 1968 Republican National Convention, Miami Beach, Florida.
Ralph Crane—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
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