Google Holds Event For Creators At YouTube Tokyo Space
Google Inc.'s YouTube logo is displayed behind the reception desk at the company's YouTube Space studio in Tokyo, Japan, on Saturday, March 30, 2013. Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images

This Is Google's Plan to Save YouTube

Nearly ten years after purchasing it for $1.65 billion, Google has a plan to make YouTube way better than ever before.

In order to compete in an increasingly crowded marketplace of digital video content — from upstart live streamers like Meerkat and Periscope to growing streaming service Netflix to newly digital HBO — YouTube has to differentiate itself. To do that, Google is tapping into the Google Brain service, which may someday be more complex than the human brain. For now, though, it's going to help wayward web wanderers find the best new videos to watch on YouTube, Fast Company reports.

Google Brain will collect huge amounts of data about how many people watch videos, how long they watch them, and other points of interest to spit out which videos a user should watch.

There are other avenues by which Google is pushing YouTube as well: advertisements for content partners on public transport, for example, and an upcoming ad-free subscription service.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com.

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