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San Francisco Bans Chewing Tobacco at Sports Venues

May 09, 2015
TIME Health
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On Friday, San Francisco became the first American city to ban smokeless tobacco—chewing tobacco and "moist inhalable snuff"—at sports venues.

The new ordinance, signed by Mayor Ed Lee, goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2016. Violators will be asked to leave the playing fields (where cigarette and cigar smoking is already banned), the Associated Press reports.

Anti-smoking groups argue that a ban on smokeless tobacco—which has been linked to cancer and nicotine addiction—sends the right message to kids who look up to the players. But San Francisco Giants pitcher Matt Cain said the measure may be hard to enforce, noting that coffee pouches resemble tobacco pouches, according to an article on the team's website.

The state Assembly is still considering a bill banning tobacco use—electronic cigarettes included—wherever there's a baseball game, the AP reports.

Read next: Why Lawmakers Want Smokeless Tobacco Thrown Out of the Homes of a National Pastime

See The Tobacco Leaves That Could Cure Ebola

An worker inspects the Nicotiana benthamiana plants at Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City
Tobacco plants are grown for six weeks in the Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City so their leaves are large enough to serve as a factory for making antibodies. The plants are not modified or genetically altered in any way during this time.Mathieu Belanger—Reuters
An worker inspects the Nicotiana benthamiana plants at Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City
Icon Genetics Provides Technology For Possible Ebola Treatment
Nicotiana benthamiana plants are dipped in a solution during the infiltration process at Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City
An worker shows the difference between the leaf of the Nicotiana benthamiana plant before (top) and after (botom) the infiltration process at Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City
Icon Genetics Provides Technology For Possible Ebola Treatment
Icon Genetics Provides Technology For Possible Ebola Treatment
Tobacco plants are grown for six weeks in the Medicago greenhouse in Quebec City so their leaves are large enough to ser
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Mathieu Belanger—Reuters
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