The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades, which bring water 223 miles from the Owens River in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountains, and 137 miles from the Haiwee Reservoir, are a major source of water for Los Angeles. Seen here in Sylmar, Calif. on May 4, 2015.Lucy Nicholson—Reuters
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades are seen in Sylmar
A creek is seen in Northridge
A tractor ploughs a field next to a canal in Los Banos
A worker walks through farm fields in Los Banos
A canal runs through farm fields in Los Banos
"In the Central Valley, where most agricultural water use occurs, the failure to manage groundwater sustainably limits its availability as a drought reserve. The increase in perennial crops—which need to be watered every year—has made the region even more vulnerable," the Public Policy Institute of California states.
Water pours into a canal in Los Banos
Livestock products, including meat, dairy and eggs, account for more than a quarter of California's agricultural sector, a $12.5 billion industry, according to the USDA. Cattle are among the most water-hungry livestock, consuming an average of106 gallons per pound of beef. Cattle are seen at Harris Ranch in Coalinga, Calif. on May 5, 2015.
A wheat field is seen in Los Banos
A water protest sign is seen in Los Banos
The Los Angeles Aqueduct Cascades, which bring water 223 miles from the Owens River in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountai
... VIEW MORE

Lucy Nicholson—Reuters
1 of 11

See How California Is Using Its Diminishing Water Resources

May 06, 2015

California regulators imposed sweeping cuts to water usage across the state this week, ordering hundreds of government agencies to meet mandatory reduction targets and urging citizens to stop watering their lawns amid unrelenting drought conditions.

Governor Jerry Brown set a goal to cut urban water use by 25 percent, but the plan still leans heavily on citizens to adopt their own water conservation methods. Above are snapshots of the key players in this crisis, and the challenges they've faced as water supplies dwindle to historic lows, as detailed by the Public Policy Institute of California.

TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice.