TIME Television

Netflix Sets Date for Orange is the New Black Season 3 Premiere

Taylor Schilling in a scene from Netflix’s “Orange is the New Black” Season 2. Photo credit: JoJo Whilden for Netflix
Jojo Whilden—Netflix Taylor Schilling in a scene from Orange is the New Black

The streaming company also gave a release date for the Wet Hot American Summer sequel

The wait is almost over for Orange is the New Black fans eager to reunite with Piper, Red, Crazy Eyes and Taystee.

Netflix announced Monday the third season of its award-winning comedy drama would premiere on the streaming service June 12. The prison-set show will return about a month before the service premieres the long-awaited sequel to Wet Hot American Summer, on July 17.

Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp will reunite the movie’s original cast for an eight-episode series, all of which will take place on the first day of summer camp.

Can’t stand the wait? Get your teaser clip here.

TIME White House

Bill Clinton’s Portrait Includes Symbolic Nod to Lewinsky Affair

Former President Bill Clinton gestures after the portraits of his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton and him, were revealed on April 24, 2006 at the Smithsonian Castle Building in Washington D.C.
Haraz N. Ghanbari—AP Former President Bill Clinton gestures after the portraits of his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton and him, were revealed on April 24, 2006, at the Smithsonian Castle Building in Washington, D.C.

The artist who created the portrait of President Clinton that hangs in the National Portrait Gallery admitted he sneaked a subtle reference to the Lewinsky scandal into the background of the painting. The shadow is "a metaphor in that it represents a shadow on the office he held"

The artist who created the portrait of President Bill Clinton that hangs in the National Portrait Gallery has admitted he sneaked a subtle reference to the Lewinsky scandal into the background of the painting.

Painter Nelson Shanks told the Philadelphia Daily News on Friday that a shadow in the 2006 painting, which can be seen falling on the mantle of the Oval Office fireplace, was more than it appeared:

“It actually literally represents a shadow from a blue dress that I had on a mannequin, that I had there while I was painting it, but not when he was there,” Shanks said. “It is also a bit of a metaphor in that it represents a shadow on the office he held, or on him.”

Shanks claimed that the Clintons “hate” the painting and have lobbied for its removal from the National Portrait Gallery, a claim the museum’s spokesperson denied.

Read more at the Philadelphia Daily News.

Read next: Here’s How Much the Home of the Next President Is Worth

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Gadgets

Microsoft Reinvented the Keyboard — Yes, the Keyboard

It folds down the middle and uses Bluetooth

For heavy-duty writing on the go, regular keyboards are too big, while touchscreen keyboards are too small. But Microsoft is betting that is new, foldable keyboard will be just right.

Microsoft unveiled the Universal Foldable Keyboard on Monday, a thin, lightweight keypad that folds down the middle. Unfold the keyboard and it automatically powers on and connects wirelessly to Bluetooth-enabled phones or tablets. The battery lasts upwards of three months on a single charge, according to Microsoft.

The keyboard will go on sale at the Microsoft Store and various retailers this July for $99.95.

Read next: See Why Samsung Needs the Galaxy S6 To Be a Massive Hit

Listen to the most important stories of the day.

TIME Gadgets

This Magic Button Delivers Pizza to You and That’s It

Click N' Pizza
La Comanda Click N' Pizza

Dial "P" for pizza

Ever wish you could order a pizza in a click of a button? Your ship has finally come in, thanks to an enterprising Italian startup gambling on an explosion of buttons for popular takeaway items.

The Click’N’Pizza button, which is made by the Milan-based La Comanda, clasps to any refrigerator door and requires a little programming up front. Users can select up to four favorite topping orders on a circular screen. A tap of the button will wirelessly transmit the number one ranked order to a local pizza joint. Users with a bit more patience can use a scroll wheel to select lower ranked orders.

In either case, the button excitedly confirms orders with the message, “Pizza is coming!”

La Comanda founder Carlo Brianza says the company already has a distribution partnership to sell the button at Pizza Hut locations in North America, Yahoo News reports.

“We are starting out in the Pizza delivery market,”says Carlo Brianza, CEO of La Comanda, “but the Click’N’ . . . family can provide a new e-commerce experience for customers in a variety of services, such as coffee pods (Click’N’Coffee), meal options (Click’N’Food), and beverages (Click’N’Drink),”

But they better move fast, because even in this niche market, they already have a competitor: the Pie Pal, a single click button that communicates with Domino’s ordering system.

TIME technology

Why This Company Wants to Stop You From Buying an iPhone

SWEDEN-ERICSSON-BUSINESS-LAYOFFS-TELECOMUNICATIONS
Jonathan Nackstrand—AFP/Getty Images Ericsson logo at the Ericsson headquarters in Stockholm's suburb of Kista on November 7, 2012.

A fight between heavyweights

Ericsson AB has asked US regulators to block all domestic sales of Apple products as part of an escalating patent dispute between the two tech giants.

The request came as Ericsson filed seven separate lawsuits against Apple, alleging that Apple’s highly popular devices infringed on upwards of 41 patents, Bloomberg News reports.

Apple suspended royalty payments to Ericsson in January, after the two companies failed to renew an agreement over licensing fees. Apple accused Ericsson of “abusive” pricing that attempted to skim profits off of unrelated innovations. Ericsson has countered that its licensing terms did not “extract more than the value we put on the table.”

Read more at Bloomberg News.

TIME Innovation

Watch How Dust Makes an Amazing Journey From Africa to South America

This NASA footage shows show dust from the Sahara winds up in the Amazon rainforest

The Amazon rainforest might be a little less green if not for a massive plume of Saharan dust that drifts across the Atlantic Ocean each year, according to a new, multi-year study by NASA scientists.

NASA used light pulses from its CALIPSO satellite to measure the transatlantic dust cloud in three dimensions. They found that wind carries roughly 182 million tons of Saharan dust out to sea each year. The cloud sheds roughly 50 million en route to South America, but the remainder fans out over the Amazonian basin and the Caribbean Sea, dusting the soil with 22,000 tons of phosphorus, a nutrient commonly found in commercial grade fertilizer.

Amazingly, the special delivery of plant food almost perfectly matches the amount of phosphorous the Amazonian jungle loses through heavy rains and run-off water.

“This is a small world,” said study author Hongbin Yu, “and we’re all connected together.”

 

TIME Innovation

See the Men Who Got Their Hands Cut Off and Replaced With Bionic Ones

Milorad Marinkovic holds an egg with his bionic arm with his bionic arm in Vienna, Austria on Feb. 24, 2015.
Ronald Zak—AP Milorad Marinkovic holds an egg with his bionic arm with his bionic arm in Vienna, Austria on Feb. 24, 2015.

"I can do almost everything with it. I just don't have any feeling in it."

Three Austrian men who lost motor control over their hands volunteered for a breakthrough surgical procedure to amputate their lifeless appendages and replace them with bionic hands.

Doctors hailed the operations as the first cases of “bionic reconstruction,” in which the mechanical hand is hardwired directly into the patient’s arm, enabling the patient to open and close the fingers without external controls, the Associated Press reports.

Milorad Marinkovic demonstrates writing with his bionic hand as he poses for a photograph at his home in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015. Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The three men are the first to undergo what doctors refer to as “bionic reconstruction,” which includes voluntary amputation, transplantation of nerves and muscles and learning to use faint signals from them to command the hand. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
Ronald Zak—AP

Nerves and muscles transplanted from the patient’s legs run signals from the brain directly into the prosthetic arm. “I can do almost everything with it,” one patient, Milorad Marinkovic, 30, told the Associated Press. “I just don’t have any feeling in it.”

Milorad Marinkovic shows his bionic arm as he poses for a photograph at his home in Vienna, Austria, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015. Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The three men are the first to undergo what doctors refer to as “bionic reconstruction,” which includes voluntary amputation, transplantation of nerves and muscles and learning to use faint signals from them to command the hand. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
Ronald Zak—AP

TIME Security

SIM Card Company Says the NSA Probably Hacked It

Mobile phone SIM card
David Gould—Getty Images

But it denies the NSA got access to billions of people's mobile communications

One of the world’s largest manufacturers of SIM cards has acknowledged evidence of security agency attacks on the company’s internal networks, but it’s denying that American and British intelligence agents were able to get access to billions of mobile phone users’ secure data.

Gemalto, a French-Dutch supplier of SIM cards, found “reasonable grounds” of an attack by U.S. National Security Agency and its British counterpart, the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) following an internal investigation into a series of security incidents. The audits came after online publication The Intercept reported on what it said was a joint British-American operation to covertly hack Gemalto’s stash of SIM encryption keys, based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

SIM cards are small encrypted devices inside cell phones that carry users’ unique identifier codes on a network. Breaking their encryption could allow intelligence agencies or hackers easier access to targets’ mobile communication.

In particular, Gemalto cited two “sophisticated intrusions” in 2010 and 2011, one of which involved sending malware-infected attachments from faked company email addresses. Gemalto acknowledged that the breaches may have enabled a third party such as the NSA to spy on internal communications from company employees, but denied the breach led to a massive loss of encryption keys. The Intercept previously reported that the NSA and GCHQ stole encryption codes as Gemalto sent them to device makers like China’s Huawei.

“The attacks against Gemalto only breached its office networks and could not have resulted in a massive theft of SIM encryption keys,” read a statement from the company.

TIME Innovation

Saying ‘Open Sesame’ Actually Unlocks Doors Now

A new app wirelessly unlocks doors by a classic spoken command

The expression “open sesame” was popularized by a folk tale in One Thousand and One Nights, but it’s taken roughly three centuries for the expression to start opening doors in real life.

MIT graduate student Dheera Venkatraman calls his “Sesame” app for Android Wear smartwatches an “exceedingly simple project” to unlock a door using spoken commands. The wearer simply needs to shout into the watch face, “OK Google, open sesame” to open the app. It then wirelessly transmits a command via Bluetooth to turn an Internet-connected lock.

Of course, the lock itself has to be outfitted with a fair amount of hardware. Venkatraman fastened a small rotating cuff to a deadbolt handle. The apparatus is still very much an early build with a few exposed wires running along the door. Still, Venkatraman has shared instructions on his website so hobbyists can gather up the components, copy the code and add their own refinements to an idea that’s been some 300 years in the making.

TIME europe

European Officials Suggest Ban on Cloned Meat

Genetically Cloned Calves
Erik S. Lesser—Getty Images The first herd of eight genetically identical cloned calves are presented during a press conference June 26, 2001 at the University of Georgia in Athens.

A ban on consuming meat or dairy from cloned livestock has been on hold since 2013

European officials said Monday that they want to bar cloned livestock, amid debate over a proposed ban that has been stalled since 2013.

“Consumers don’t want it, farmers don’t need it and the suffering of all animals involved is severe and extreme,” Anja Hazekamp, a Dutch representative to the European Union’s parliament, said during a public hearing in Brussels. Her remarks were reported by the trade publication Global Meat News.

The E.U. drafted a proposal to ban cloned meat sales in 2013, but passage has been stalled amid questions of how to impose the ban on meat imported from abroad. European farmers do import semen from cloned animals for breeding, and industry advocates have rejected labels on cloned meat products as too onerous and costly to implement.

Read more at Global Meat News

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