Amy Toensing for The National Geographic
By Mikko Takkunen
May 20, 2013

Features and Essays

Fan TV has a simple proposition for Time Warner customers: For $99, it will make your cable TV-watching experience better. You buy the box and stick it in your living room, in place of a regular cable box. Instead of the the regular guide--cluttered with row upon row of channels you never watch--you get personalized recommendations, not just for stuff that's on cable, but for shows and movies from other streaming video sources like Crackle and Redbox Instant. And instead of a huge, clunky remote, you use a touchscreen pad that responds to swipes and taps. But as CNet points out, Fan TV also makes the experience worse in a few significant ways: You can only watch what's available through Time Warner Cable's mobile app, which means some channels may not be available. You also can't record live shows for later viewing or watch recordings from another DVR. A full cable box stand-in this is not. No disrespect to Fan TV, which has created what appears to be a pleasant interface and concept. But whole setup is preposterous. Here we have a cable company that is unwilling to reinvent its stodgy old system for watching television, but continues to increase prices year after year for basically the same service. To justify these higher prices, Time Warner and other providers point out how they're offering more channels than ever, regardless of whether subscribers asked for these channels. Meanwhile, the licensing costs to carry all these channels keeps going up, and all subscribers get is more clutter in an increasingly mind-boggling TV guide interface. So now, we have a company that promises to fix the clutter--not for the same exhorbitant prices you've been paying, mind you, but for an extra $99. Oh, but no DVR allowed. Sorry. No wonder an increasing number of people have dropped cable in favor of cheaper, smarter, more convenient online video services. And no wonder companies like Google and Apple have delayed or given up on plans to make cable TV better. It's a lost cause. On a section of Fan TV's website, the company wonders aloud whether it's crazy to compete with the tech giants and instead cozy up to pay TV providers like Time Warner. Now we know the answer.
Amy Toensing for The National Geographic

Amy Toensing: First Australians (National Geographic) Aboriginals had the continent to themselves for 50,000 years. Today they make up less than 3 percent of the population, and their traditional lifestyle is disappearing. Almost. In the homelands the ancient ways live on. | From the June 2013 issue of the National Geographic magazine.

Marcus Bleasdale: Last of the Viking Whalers (National Geographic) Norway reserves the right to hunt minkes. But kids don’t want to grow up to be whalers.

Dmitry Kostyukov: Dagestan (LightBox) After the FBI announced that two brothers from southern Russia had bombed the Boston Marathon, the world’s attention quickly turned to where these brothers had come from — a lush strip of highlands called Dagestan. Photographer Dmitry Kostyukov reports from the Russian republic.

Arthur Bondar: Signatures of War (The Huffington Post) Soviet Veterans Of World War II

Ivan Sigal: White Road (NYT Lens) Trek through Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan

Fan TV has a simple proposition for Time Warner Cable customers: For $99, it will make your cable TV-watching experience better. You buy the box and stick it in your living room, in place of a regular cable box. Instead of the the regular guide--cluttered with row upon row of channels you never watch--you get personalized recommendations, not just for stuff that's on cable, but for shows and movies from other streaming video sources like Crackle and Redbox Instant. And instead of a huge, clunky remote, you use a touchscreen pad that responds to swipes and taps. But as CNet points out, Fan TV also makes the experience worse in a few significant ways: You can only watch what's available through Time Warner Cable's mobile app, which means some channels may not be available. You also can't record live shows for later viewing or watch recordings from another DVR. A full cable box stand-in this is not. No disrespect to Fan TV, which has created what appears to be a pleasant interface and concept. But the whole setup is preposterous. Here we have a cable company that is unwilling to reinvent its stodgy old system for watching television, but continues to increase prices year after year. To justify these higher prices, Time Warner Cable and other providers point out how they're offering more channels than ever, regardless of whether subscribers asked for these channels. Meanwhile, the licensing costs to carry all these channels keep going up, and all subscribers get is more clutter in an increasingly mind-numbing TV guide interface. So now, instead of addressing those problems, Time Warner Cable turns to another company that promises to fix the clutter--not for the same exorbitant prices you've been paying, mind you, but for an extra $99. Oh, but no DVR allowed. Sorry. No wonder more people are ditching or skipping cable in favor of cheaper, smarter, more convenient online video services. And no wonder companies like Google and Apple have delayed or given up on plans to make cable TV better. It's a lost cause. On a section of Fan TV's website, the company wonders aloud whether it's crazy to compete with the tech giants and instead cozy up to pay TV providers like Time Warner Cable. At last, we know the answer.
Eric Thayer / Reuters

Eric Thayer: Along the Southern border (Reuters) Border Patrol agents are recording a rise in deaths and apprehensions in south Texas,where the Rio Grande River separates the U.S. from Mexico. | Thayer on working on the series

Erin Trieb: Faces of the NRA: Inside America’s gun club (NBC News)

Matt Mills McKnight: The Klansman (CNN Photo blog)

That time has come again when everyone wanting to save money on their air conditioning expenses flocks to the movie theaters for the big blockbuster hits. And with the Cameron Diaz vehicle The Other Woman premiering Friday, it's time to see what Hollywood's take on 51 percent of the population will be this summer. It's no secret that women aren't getting a fair share of worthwhile screen time in Hollywood: only 30 percent of all speaking roles belonged to women in 2013, even with huge hits starring women like Gravity and The Hunger Games. And summer tends to be the worst when the best roles a woman can ask for is playing a superhero's damsel in distress. But after The Heat's success last summer, it looks like we're getting more women on screen this year. Some are kick-ass, like Scarlett Johansson in Lucy, others look to be the same old ditzy, slutty or moon-eyed stereotypes that Hollywood just keeps churning out. I've gone through the trailers for the big summer films starring women. (Films like 22 Jump Street, Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Hercules didn't have enough women in the trailers to even qualify. I'm also skipping disaster films like Godzilla and Into the Storm because the trailers, at least, show equal opportunity destruction.) I have rated them "good," bad" or "ugly" from a woman's standpoint based on the following factors. 1. How prominently the woman is featured in the trailer 2. How likely the movie looks based on the trailer to pass the Bechdel test—a handy test that asks if a. two women talk to each other in a film about b. something other than a man 3. How original or unoriginal the female role looks I have not seen any of these films, so I cannot judge them based on their quality. I also cannot tell if a movie like Walk of Shame is secretly a feminist manifesto but is just being advertised as a movie full of prostitute jokes. (It's not.) I am just basing my analysis on the trailers. Here we go: MAY The Other Woman https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlHMHLuJWbo Ruling: BAD It's like they tried to write a script in violation of the Bechdel test by stuffing as many blondes as possible in one movie and having them only talk about one (extremely sexy, plucked right from Game of Thrones) man the whole time. Sure, they're getting their vengeance—but can't they all just dump him? Does Cameron Diaz's high powered lawyer have time for this? The Amazing Spider-Man 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DlM2CWNTQ84 Ruling: BAD I watched three different Spider-Man 2 trailers to find one where Emma Watson had more than one line to say. I was unsuccessful. At least in this trailer her and Peter have a "meaningful" interaction where he traps her with his web so she can't follow him into a dangerous situation and then she accidentally yells out his secret identity. Adhering to the damsel in distress trope much? Please, someone give Emma Stone an Easy A-like script again. Free her! Belle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wtdk6owFj2o Ruling: GOOD The movie celebrates the story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the mixed-race daughter of Admiral Sir John Lindsay who helped influence her uncle Lord Mansfield—the man responsible for paving the way for slavery's abolition in England. The movie features a strong young woman who has things on her mind other than love (though, this being 18th Century England, that Jane Austen-esque aspect is of course a part of it too). X-Men: Days of Future Past https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsjtg7m1MMM Ruling: BAD The X-Men franchise really lucked out, signing Jennifer Lawrence on before she got too big. I imagine now she'll have an enhanced role in the ensemble film (she gets more air time than Halle Berry in the trailer and Ellen Page is nowhere to be seen). Still, nothing in this trailer indicates that this movie will pass the Bechdel test. Plus, we can't forget Lawrence's superhero "costume" is just a bunch of blue body paint. Maleficent JUNE Edge of Tomorrow Fault of Our Stars Transformers: Age of Extinction JULY Tammy Begin Again Jupiter Ascending Sex Tape AUGUST Guardians of the Galaxy Lucy Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles The Giver Sin City: A Dame to Kill For
Daniel Shea

Daniel Shea: Chicago Fire (The Fader) On the ground, navigating the city’s epidemic of youth violence. | Related on HuffPost Live: Lens on Chicago Violence

Phillip Toledano: Beatitude’s Dementia Ward (Photo Booth) Retirement community in Phoenix, Arizona.

Ilona Szwarc: A Daughter-in-Law’s Tale (LightBox) Photographer Ilona Szwarc’s camera has brought her closer to her mother-in-law than she could ever imagine.

Brandon Thibodeaux: When Morning Comes (Esquire Russia) Life in the Mississippi Delta

Jeffrey Milstein: Flying (Slate Behold photo blog) Airports from the flying viewpoint

Ruth Prieto Arenas: In Color, the Waitresses in a Restaurant for Lonely Men (NYT Lens) Photos of Mexican women in The United States

Jay L. Clendenin: A Coachella Double Take (LA Times Framed photo blog)

Mae Ryan: Imported Filipino Brides (AudioVision) United States

After the birth of her daughter, Restaurateur Alice Waters decided she had to do something to improve the way children everywhere ate and thought about food. She teamed up with Martin Luther King Middle School in Berkley, CA and the Edible Schoolyard Project was born.
Massimo Berruti / Agence VU

Massimo Berruti: On Pakistan’s Election Trail (LightBox) Photographs of the build-up to Pakistan’s elections, which were held May 11.

Tyler Hicks: Preparing for Watershed Elections in Pakistan (NYT)

Andrea Bruce: Pakistan, as Seen Through its Railways (NYT)

Zhang Kechun: Chinese Dream (MoST)

Philip Cheung: Shifting Sands: Surreal Landscapes of the United Arab Emirates (LightBox)

Cedric Arnold: Thailand’s Magical Tattoos (Slate Behold photo blog)

GMB Akash: Factories of Death (Panos Pictures) Bangladesh

Behrouz Mehri: Sister battles breast cancer (AFP Correspondent blog) Tehran photographer Behrouz Mehri documents his sister’s battle against terminal breast cancer

Hajime Kimura: Life And Death Of A Japanese Racehorse (NPR)

How can women rise to the top if they don't believe they belong there?
Mauricio Lima for The New York Times

Mauricio Lima: Brazilian Military’s Crucible: Jungle Warfare Instruction (NYT)

Miquel Dewever-Plana: Guatemala, trial of a genocide (Agence Vu)

Helge Skodvin: Norway, 240 Landscape (Agence Vu) 2 850 000 Volvo 240 cars were made between 1974 and 1993. It became the car of choice of the Nordic countries. 84 287 were sold in Norway. More than any other car, the 240 became a symbol of Norwegian and Nordic values.

Maja Daniels: Monette and Mady (Slate Behold photo blog) The identical life of identical twins, Monette and Mady

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Summoning the Caretos (Firecracker) Portugal

Piotr Malecki: Disco Polo Fever (Panos Pictures) Poland

Warrick Page: London Burlesque (Stern)

Hector Mediavilla: The Surprising Sartorial Culture Of Congolese ‘Sapeurs’ (NPR)

Alexia Webster: South African Village Still Grappling with Apartheid (NYT Lens)

Guillaume Herbaut: Benin: Independence Day Parade (Institute)

Siegfried Modola: Ethiopia’s ancient salt trails (Reuters)

Riverboom: Maternity in Cameroon (Institute)

Articles

Is your online dating profile failing to attract “the one?” It may be because of the words you’re using, a new analysis from dating site PlentyOfFish reveals. In the study, a team of PhD scientists analyzed the words used by the 1.2 million profiles on PlentyOfFish. According to the company, very clear trends arose amongst those who were successful in finding love and those who were still looking. Those who have found love, unsurprisingly, use the word “love” the most in their profiles. Successful daters of both sexes frequently used the words “time,” “life,” “friend” and “music,” as well. Men are more likely to find love using words in their online dating profile that suggest an interest in a long-term relationship. The words “heart,” “children,” “romantic” and “relationship” are all markers of a man most likely to see success in love. The advice holds true for women, as well: Women who found relationships used the word “relationship” 16% more often than those who are still single. Those still looking for love tend to use words that describe shorter term activities, like "travel," "dinner" and "shop" for women and "hang" and "humor" for men. Want to learn more about saucing up your online dating profile? Check out this more detailed word analysis of successful OKCupid and Match.com profiles. Then be sure to read up on these online dating red flags so you know what – and who – to avoid online. This article was written by Fox Van Allen and originally appeared on Techlicious. More from Techlicious: The Best Web Browser Cobra CWR200 Weather Radio Offers 'Tornado Mode' AT&T Prepaid GoPhone Plans Get More Data, Hotspot Capability How Activity Monitors Could Cut Your Future Health Insurance Bills 5 Tips for Creating Strong Passwords
Taslima Akhter

Final Embrace: The Most Haunting Photograph from Banglandesh(LightBox) Many powerful photographs have been made in the aftermath of the devastating collapse of a garment factory on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh. But one photo, by Bangladeshi photographer Taslima Akhter, has emerged as the most heart wrenching, capturing an entire country’s grief in a single image.

Not So Long Ago, In Iraq (Vanity Fair) Images and captions excerpted from Photojournalists on War: The Untold Stories from Iraq, by Michael Kamber, with an introduction by Dexter Filkins. The book came out on May 15, 2013, via University of Texas Press.

Tomás Munita: 2013 Recipient of the Chris Hondros Fund Award (LightBox)

Honoring a Fallen Photographer’s Spirit (NYT Lens) Tomás Munita Wins Chris Hondros Fund Award

Iconic war photography – audio slideshow (Guardian) War/Photography has won the prestigious Kraszna-Krausz best photography book award at this year’s Sony world photography awards. Here, author Anne Wilkes Tucker explains the meaning and history of photography in armed conflict and what constitutes an iconic war photograph

Robert Fisk on War Reporting (Indepedent)

Enhanced Reality: Exploring the Boundaries of Photo Editing (Spiegel Online) Even top news photographers have their work digitally enhanced these days. Mounting competition in the market for news images is forcing photo-journalists to make their output as dramatic as possible. But where are the limits of cosmetic improvement? | Related: The Story Behind a Photo: How Prize-Winning Images Are Edited (video)

Is the ‘Press Photo of the Year’ Actually Photoshop Art? (The Atlantic Wire)

Digital photography experts confirm the integrity of Paul Hansen’s image files (World Press Photo)

Super-reality of Gaza funeral photo due to toning technique says contest winner (Guardian)

No Sense of Irony In Hansen “Fake” Journalism Accusation (PDN)

Hansen’s World Press Winning Photo Not Fake… Just Unbelievable (BagNewsNotes)

Arko Datta / Reuters

The Rhetoric of Prize-Winning Photographs (No Caption Needed)

When Words are Photoshopped (No Caption Needed)

Who believes photographs? (David Campbell blog)

Tattoo Removal on the Photo Desk (NYT)

Ethics? What ethics? State-of-the-art photo retouching tips from 1946 (American Copy Editors Society)

Everybody Street (Nowness) A New Documentary Turns the Lens on New York’s Luminary Curbside Photographers

Revisiting Some Well-Eyed Streets (NYT) Garry Winogrand Retrospective in San Franscisco

Garry Winogrand – Nonstop and Unedited (NYT Lens)

Garry Winogrand, edited by Leo Rubinfien et al – review (Guardian) Winogrand’s photos on the Guardian website here

Supporting Photographers, Moving Walls (LightBox) The Open Society Foundations mark their 20th group exhibition of “Moving Walls” — a project reflecting the group’s support for long-term documentary photography.

Moving Walls — and Minds (NYT Lens) Open Society Foundation’s 20th ‘Moving Walls’ Exhibition

Donna DeCesare captures children in a world of gangs (AudioVision)

Jon Lowenstein on the South Side: Shots Fired (BagNewsNotes)

Featured photographer: Chiara Tocci (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Sam Wolson (Verve Photo)

Featured photographer: Lorenzo Tugnoli (Verve Photo)

David Moore’s best photograph – children on a Derby estate (Guardian)

There are certain things one might assume you're supposed to have mastered as a columnist. One is how to start a column. But if you're me, you can spend hours writing and rewriting and deleting and restructuring a piece before coming to the conclusion that you have no business having a column at all. Crumpled over your sad desk in your living room, in your freelance uniform (pajamas), you are pretty sure your new writing contract will be revoked by the end of the week. Then you realize: you're doing precisely what it is you're supposed to be writing about -- doubting yourself, over and over again, to the point of crippling paralysis. The perils of feminine self-doubt -- and how they impact women's professional aspirations -- are the subject of a new book, The Confidence Code, by journalists (and recovering self-doubters) Katty Kay and Claire Shipman. Through dozens of interviews, scientific research and even experiments in genetic testing, The Confidence Code takes on the science and art of self-assurance, as well as the fact that women (like me) tend to struggle with it disproportionately. Why it matters? Well, by now most of us have heard the stories about how women are climbing the corporate ranks, dominating the workforce and graduating in higher numbers than men. "Lean In" has become part of the pop lexicon. But what does any of that matter if women can't have the confidence to own their accomplishments and strive for their goals? How can women equal the ranks of the professional world, the authors ask, if we don’t even believe we’re supposed to be there? “I think there’s a mainstream recognition now that organizations are better off with a diverse group of women at the top​ -- and a focus on how to get more women in the pipeline and in power,” says Shipman. “But there’s also something inside of us that’s holding us back.” Longtime friends Kay and Shipman realized over dinner one night that each struggled with the same problem of self-doubt. Kay, a news anchor for the BBC, has covered three presidential elections, the wars in Kosovo, Afghanistan and Iraq, and speaks several languages. And yet she spent her career convinced she wasn’t smart enough to compete for the top jobs. Shipman, a contributor to ABC and Good Morning America, had a habit of telling people she’d gotten “lucky” when she asked how she got into journalism. She began her career as a foreign correspondent at CNN, reporting from Moscow. But the confidence problem wasn’t just limited to them. In two decades covering American politics, the two journalists had interviewed some of the most powerful women in the nation -- lawmakers and CEOs, professional athletes, leaders of social movements. Time and again, they saw the same self-doubt: bright women with ideas afraid to raise their hands, speak up, ask for a raise or a promotion; that inexplicable feeling that they don’t own the right to rule at the top. “If they are feeling all that,” the authors write, “imagine what it is like for the rest of us.” What it’s like looks something like this. When a professional endeavor goes wrong, women are more likely to blame themselves. Yet when something goes right, they credit circumstance – or other people – for their success. (Men do the opposite.) Women are more likely than men to be perfectionists, holding themselves back from answering a question, applying for a new job, asking for a raise, until they're absolutely 100 percent sure we can predict the outcome. (Women applied for a promotion only when they met 100 percent of the qualifications. Men applied when they met 50 percent.) Women are a quarter as likely as men to negotiate a raise. We doubt our opinions and begin our sentences with “I don’t know if this is right, but—.” We are more prone to “rumination” than men – which causes us to overthink and overanalyze. (Sound familiar?) I was watching Hillary Clinton up on stage recently, at a conference for women. She was asked to give the younger generation career advice. “At this point in my career, I’ve employed so many young people,” Hillary began. "One of the differences is that when I say to a young woman, ‘I want you to take on this extra responsibility,” almost invariably she says, ‘Do you think I’m ready?’ But when I ask a man, he goes, ‘How high, how fast, when do I start?!’” “Too many young women,” Clinton continued, “are harder on themselves than circumstances warrant. They are too often selling themselves short.” In other words, they lack confidence. And confidence, as the authors make clear, is as important to professional success as competence. Now naturally, there are plenty of ways that women can gain confidence. And in fact, it's not quite so simple as learning those skills. (In many cases, it's the same qualities that make women good for business -- they are more collaborative, for example -- that holds them back from touting their accomplishments or taking credit.) We also need to address structural changes that hold women back -- as, naturally, there's only so much leaning in a person can do. But perhaps the most useful aspect of all of this talk about confidence is recognizing that it's a problem at all. Knowing that it’s there, that it’s backed by science, that it's not just you – and then trying to correct for it. “I think it's important for women to recognize that it's totally normal for us to feel nervous, particularly in situations in which we're so often the only woman in the room,” says Kay. "That realization -- for me, anyway -- has helped me work to overcome it."   Jessica Bennett is a former Newsweek editor and freelance journalist in New York City. She is a contributing editor for Sheryl Sandberg’s women’s foundation, Lean In. You can follow her @jess7bennett
FT Weekend Magazine, May 11/12 2013

Vanessa Winship : Looking for America (FT Magazine) On her road trip across the US, British photographer Vanessa Winship captured the smallness of ordinary lives set against a vast backdrop of land, sky and the illusion of escape

Each picture paints 1,000 words in Vanessa Winship’s US photos (BBC)

Vanessa Winship: she dances on Jackson (Nowness)

Book review: Control Order House by Edmund Clark (Rationalist Association)

Publisher Bets on Big Collectible Books (WSJ) While many book publishers are heavily investing in the digital frontier, Benedikt Taschen is looking to corner the market in oversize collectible books.

JR’s Times Square Photo Booth (Photo Booth)

Alexandra Avakian’s revolutionary photography (AudioVision)

Documenting Quiet, Deadly Hardship in Sierra Leone (American Photo magazine) Mustafah Abdulaziz’s series “Water Is Gold” takes us to a place where access to clean water is a matter of life and death

Luigi Ghirri’s Kodachromes Revisited (LightBox) Jeffrey Ladd writes for LightBox about a recently re-released edition of Luigi Ghirri’s 1978 book, ‘Kodachrome’.

Is Nobuyoshi Araki’s photography art or porn? (Guardian) Araki’s pictures of trussed-up women in various states of undress – currently on show in London – explore the hidden eroticism beneath Japan’s polite society

Precious, by Jane Hilton, review (Telegraph) Precious, by Jane Hilton, captures intimate scenes in the brothels of Nevada.

This Week In Photography Books – Walker Evans (A Photo Editor)

Don McCullin to headline Visa pour l’Image’s 25th edition (BJP)

Image Singulières festival presents Cédric Gerbehaye’s Winter in Sète (BJP) Documentary photographer Cédric Gerbehaye received carte blanche to document Sète, which hosts, each year, the Image Singulières photography festival

Tom Waits – through the lens of photographer Anton Corbijn (Guardian)

America in Color by Martin Parr (Photo Booth)

Anarchy, Attitude and Outrage: When Punk was Young and Dangerous (LightBox)
TIME looks back, through the work of three photographers—Alex Levac, Steve Johnston and Ray Stevenson—to the early days of Punk, by reproducing their gritty images in the photocopied aesthetic of the era.

Rhiannon Adam’s Seaside Polaroids (BBC)

Terry O’Neill, Photographing the icons of the ‘60s (CNN photo blog)

Pete Pin captures Cambodian diaspora in the US (AudioVision)

David Emery’s best photograph: an Andalucian brothel (Guardian)

Polaroid: The pioneering instant art (CNN Photo blog)

South Korean Newspaper May Have Just Printed the Worst Photoshop Ever (Gizmodo)

Meet the photographer behind those ‘simple’ Apple product images (Connect.dpreview.com)

Hipstamatic launches Oggl, a new social network for creative photographers (BJP)

How Photographers ‘Photoshopped’ Their Pictures Back in 1946 (PetaPixel)

Smartphones captured 2 iconic shots of new World Trade Center (Poynter)

Interviews and Talks

With our lives being so connected these days, most of us spend more time using our web browser than any other computer program. A great browser makes for the best Internet experience, so choosing the right one is a necessity. And right now both PC and Mac owners have a lot of choices. There are the default browsers, Safari and Internet Explorer, plus dozens of others that work on both platforms. What makes any of them better than the others? The best browsers are simple to use, speedy, hog as few computer resources as possible and keep you safe from malware and third-party tracking. On top of that, browsers should offer a wealth of customization options, tight integration with sites and services you use often, robust tab and window management, and syncing across computers and mobile devices. There are five browsers that have most or all of these qualities: Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, and Opera. Of these, Chrome and Firefox offer the best experiences across the board and have the advantage of being available for all major operating systems and many mobile devices. After using both browsers extensively for over six months, I found Firefox to be the superior browser. Read on to find out why. Firefox: The browser to beat If you're familiar with Firefox from years past, you might balk at my recommendation at first. Firefox was once a top browser alternative but lost a lot of popularity and users to Chrome because it grew too slow while hogging a ton of memory. It took a while, but Mozilla's developers finally turned this problem around. It's secure, fast, easy to use, customizable, uses few computer resources and makes switching between computers and mobile devices easy. Browser add-ons [caption id="attachment_72650" align="alignnone" width="560"] Mozilla[/caption] Firefox has the most robust and useful library of add-ons for its browser, making it the most customizable and useful browser. It has all of the most popular extensions and plugins—ad blockers, adjuncts to popular services like Evernote and Pocket, social network integration, etc.—plus some very useful add-ons that are only available for Firefox. For instance the Heartbleed checker for Firefox, Heartbleed-Ext, adds a red warning at the top of vulnerable sites. Plus, all of the add-ons you find in the official Mozilla repository (found under Firefox >> Add-ons) are checked for compatibility and malware, unlike Google Chrome's extension library. Add-ons won't add new or malicious functionality behind your back the way some Chrome Extensions have been accused of. By default, add-ons update automatically as the browser checks for new versions and security patches, but you can disable that so you can approve all updates. [caption id="attachment_72652" align="alignnone" width="300"] To create a Tab Group, you use the Tab Group short cut--"Ctrl + Shift + E" for PCs and "Command + Shift + E" for Macs. Then drag the tab you want to use to create a group out of the main Group Your Tabs box to create a new group. Mozilla[/caption] Tab and window management If you like to keep multiple sites open in multiple windows or tabs, Firefox's built-in tools for managing them are the best. The Tab Groups feature makes keeping tabs organized much easier and clears away the clutter that comes with having dozens of tabs open in one window. You can group tabs any way you like and even name the groups so you remember which websites you have stored inside. Switching between groups is as easy as switching between windows, but everything stays under one icon. In Firefox you can also "pin" a tab (right click on a tab to pin it), which moves it to the left of other tabs and keeps it in place permanently, even after you restart. This is useful for websites I keep open and check often, such as Gmail and Facebook, because I can always find them and see notifications. Security Besides keeping your plug-ins updated, there are other ways Firefox keeps you secure. The browser is automatically updated to ensure you have the freshest protection while surfing. And, if you come across a malware-infected site or a fake site designed for phishing, the browser will warn you before loading. This list of bad sites is kept up to date as new fakes and infections pop up. Private browsing Mozilla improved on Firefox's private browsing experience. Now it works similarly to Chrome--private windows open alongside normal ones, so you don't have to close down what you're doing to go incognito. However, you can't open multiple sessions in private windows as you can with Internet Explorer. If you're signed into one Yahoo Mail account in private, you can't sign into a second account in another private window. [caption id="attachment_72658" align="alignnone" width="300"] Mozilla[/caption] Syncing across devices The ability to sync browser data is increasingly important for people who spend their day switching between devices, be they mobile phones, tablets, or computers. It's nice to be able to reopen tabs from your computer on your phone, especially if the tab has needed information. I also appreciate having all my bookmarks, passwords, and add-ons on both my work and home computer. Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer and Safari all have some syncing capability, though the first two have the best and most comprehensive implementation. Setting up Chrome's sync is easier and faster than Firefox because all you have to do is sign in to your Google account and you're done. Firefox has a code verification system that requires using an existing synced device to authorize another, which is a minor pain. Syncing works on Android smartphones and tablets, too, since both Chrome and Firefox have mobile versions on that platform. However, there's no Firefox for iOS. Chrome is available for iPhone and iPad, though Safari is naturally more integrated with those devices and you can't change the default browser to Chrome in iOS. Final call Firefox is now back to being the best browser choice, thanks to recent updates and added features. It's secure, streamlined, customizable and makes switching between computers and mobile devices easy. This article was written by K.T. Bradford and originally appeared on Techlicious. More from Techlicious: Cobra CWR200 Weather Radio Offers 'Tornado Mode' The Words Most Likely to Find You Online Dating Success AT&T Prepaid GoPhone Plans Get More Data, Hotspot Capability How Activity Monitors Could Cut Your Future Health Insurance Bills 5 Tips for Creating Strong Passwords
Peter van Agtmael / Magnum

Peter van Agtmael (Vice) van Agtmael Won’t Deny the Strange Allure of War

Peter van Agtmael (NYT Lens) A Photographer’s Unfiltered Account of the Iraq War

Michael Kamber (Aperture blog) Photojournalist Michael Kamber, a recipient of the World Press Photo Award, has worked in the field for more than twenty-five years. He covered the war in Iraq as a writer and photographer for the New York Times between 2003 and 2012, and he was the paper’s principle photographer in Baghdad in 2007, the war’s bloodiest year. His new book, Photojournalists on War: The Untold Stories from Iraq, includes illustrated interviews with three dozen of the world’s leading photojournalists about their experiences in Iraq.

Mike Kamber (BBC) On the new book – Photojournalists on War: The Untold Story from Iraq

Platon (Fora TV) Photographer Platon Reveals Power Through Portrait | video from WIRED Business Conference 2013

Larry Towell (World Press Photo) World Press Photo 2013 Sam Presser lecture

Don McCullin (Dunhill)

Sebastião Salgado and Edward Burtynsky (Globe and Mail) The world according to the photography masters

Mark Seliger (New York Magazine : The Cut) Photographer Mark Seliger on Shooting Barack Obama, Cindy Sherman, Kurt Cobain, and More

Mario Tama (Lomography)

Paul Shambroom (Minnesota Orginal)

Nic Dunlop (dvb) ‘It is no longer useful to view Burma through the prism of Suu Kyi’

Andrea Gjestvang (NYT Lens) On her project on Utoya massacre survivors

Claudio Palmisano (DE Akademie) Digital photo editing and the ethical line between aesthetics and truth?

Louie Palu (In The Tank)

Stacy Pearsall (NYT Lens) Still Shooting After the End of War

Mitch Dobrowner (LA Times Framed photo blog) In conversation with fine art photographer Mitch Dobrowner

Camille Seaman (PW)

Maja Daniels (The Stare Show Tumblr)

Brad Smith (Inside Sports Illustrated) Sports Illustrated Director of Photography Brad Smith Discusses this Week’s Leading Off

Frank Meo (PDN) Meo Weighs In on iPad vs Print Portfolio Presentation


Mikko Takkunen is an associate photo editor at TIME.com.


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