TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 18, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Melissa Lyttle‘s work from the tiny southern Caribbean island of Curaçao, which has become an unlikely breeding ground of major league baseball players. The autonomous territory, which is linked to the Netherlands, is twice the size of Brooklyn, and has a population of 150,000. But in baseball, it’s a giant: in 2014 alone, it had seven players in the MLB, making Curaçao the land with the most major leaguers per capita in the world this last season. One of them, Didi Grigious, is likely to succeed Yankees legend Derek Jeter as the team’s new shortstop. Lyttle’s photographs capture a fascinating glimpse of the island; its notoriously rocky fields and future talent.

Melissa Lyttle: An Unlikely Source of Big Talent (The New York Times)

Lynn Johnson: The First Year (National Geographic) These compelling photographs document children’s early development.

Julian Röder: Mission and Task (Wired Rawfile) These pictures capture the officers and equipment that European Union uses to guard its borders.

Top 100 Photos of 2014 (TIME LightBox)

2014 Photos of the Year (Mashable)

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 17, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Tyler Hicks‘ work aboard the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf, one of the launch pads of the U.S.-led air campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS). More than a dozen warplanes take off from the carrier every day for missions over Iraq and Syria. The five-acre ship, with a crew of more than 5,000, has long played a role in the U.S.’s fight against terrorism. Some of the first air strikes of the Afghan war in 2001 were made by jets that took off from the Vinson, and it was on that same ship that, in 2011, Navy SEALs brought Osama bin Laden’s body after a raid in Pakistan, and buried it at sea. Hicks’ photographs offer an intriguing look at this massive symbol of American military power in the Middle East.

Tyler Hicks: A Desert War on ISIS, Fought From a Floating City (The New York Times)

Kirsten Luce: Documenting Immigration From Both Sides of the Border (TIME LightBox) Powerful photographs of migrants trying to enter the U.S. and the border patrols trying to catch them.

Robin Hammond: Lagos Portraits (National Geographic) Compelling portraits of Lagosians presented alongside their take on the city.

The Year in Pictures: 2014 (NBC News)

John Stanmeyer (Vogue Italy) Insightful interview with the World Press Photo of the Year 2013 winner.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 15, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Monique Jaques‘ work from the fourth annual World Muslimah Award in Indonesia. The award, informally known as Miss Muslimah, is seen as Islam’s answer to Miss World. Instead of bikini rounds, Miss Muslimah contestants take part in Koran recitals, Islamic shopping challenges and debates around approved fashion accessories, to find a personality that could serve as a role model for millions of Muslim women around the world. But as it turns out, it’s not completely unlike traditional beauty pageants. There might be hijabs, but also high heels, tiaras and trophies. Jaques’ photographs offer a fascinating look at the event, which strives to put piety over beauty.

Monique Jaques: High Heels and Hijabs (Al Jazeera America)

Year in Focus — The Year’s Best Photojournalism (Getty Images)

Photos of the Year 2014 (The Wall Street Journal)

Michel du Cille: A Photographer With Compassion and Respect (The New York Times Lens) Moving tribute by James Estrin to the Washington Post photographer who died while on assignment in Liberia last week. | Read also TIME LightBox remembrance by David von Drehle

Steve McCurry (Phaidon)It’s the journey not the destination,” says the legendary Magnum photographer.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 12, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Fernando Moleres‘ work on the rehabilitation of young Internet gaming addicts in China. There are more than 600 million web users in the country and around 10% of online minors are said to show signs of Internet-related addictions. Moleres documents a center in southern Beijing, which treats severely addicted youth — some have spent up to 20 hours a day online — using a tough-love approach with military discipline, drugs and psychotherapy. The excellent photographs capture the center’s 60-some boys and six girls (ranging from mid- to late-teens) going through soldier-like morning drills, group therapy sessions and neurological examinations, all in the hope of breaking their isolating web habits. It’s an intriguing look at a very modern problem.

Fernando Moleres: Inside an Internet gaming disorder rehab center in China (Al Jazeera America)

Natalie Keyssar: Ferguson in focus: A Look Back at a Community Upended (MSNBC) These photographs made in late August and late November show a community still coming to terms with the death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown.

Best photos of 2014 (European Pressphoto Agency)

William Daniels Wins 2014 Tim Hetherington Grant (TIME LightBox) The French photographer was awarded the grant for his ongoing work in Central African Republic.

Photography is art and always will be (The Guardian) Guardian’s photography critic Sean O’Hagan hits back at a commenter claiming photographs cannot be considered fine art.

Michel du Cille, Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist, dies at 58 (The Washington Post)

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 11, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Evgenia Arbugaeva‘s photographs of a weather man living in extreme solitude in northern Russia. The photographs follow Vyacheslav Korotki, a Polyarniki – a meteorologist specializing in the polar north, who mans a remote Arctic outpost in Khodovarikha, where he keeps track of the temperatures, snowfall and wind. The closest town to Khodovarikha is an hour away — by helicopter — and visitors are rare with supplies brought in only once a year. From the outside, Korotki’s existence appears to be a lonely one, but as Arbugaeva explains in her accompanying text, she found him to be anything but. This man is right where he wants to be. The pictures are stunning and the viewers can almost feel the Arctic cold. It’s truly extraordinary work.

Evgenia Arbugaeva: Weather Man (The New Yorker)

Larry Towell: Afghanistan (The New York Times Lens) Another look at the Magnum photographer’s Afghanistan work which was recently published as book.

How John Moore Covered the Ebola Outbreak (TIME LightBox) The Getty photographer talks about his assignment covering Ebola in Liberia.

China’s wild west: photographing a vanishing way of life (The Guardian) For her book Wild Pigeon, Carolyn Drake spent seven years exploring China’s Xinjiang and the Uyghurs living there. The work is collaborative as Drake asked the locals to draw on, reassemble and play with her photographs. The work was also published on TIME LightBox in November.

Sim Chi Yin – A Singaporean Abroad (Channel NewsAsia) A TV program on photographer Sim Chi Yin and her long term projects.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 10, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Kirsten Luce‘s work on vigilante justice in Guerrero, Mexico. The southern Mexican state has been in the news recently after the disappearance of 43 students, who were allegedly rounded up by police and killed by drug gangs. Guerrero is a poor region with the highest homicide rate in Mexico. In the worst areas, civilians have banded together to create self-defense groups called “autodefensas” to protect their communities from cartel related violence. One of the driving forces behind the autodefensas is the perceived lack of help from local, state and federal authorities. While not recent, Luce’s photographs from Ayutla de los Libres offer a compelling look at citizens taking the law into their own hands.

Kirsten Luce: Vigilante Justice in the Heart of Southern Mexico’s Drug War (The Washington Post In Sight)

Meridith Kohut: Vegetable Spawns Larceny and Luxury in Peru (The New York Times) These photographs show how a Peruvian vegetable, maca, and its growing demand is creating havoc in the farming communities.

Peter van Agtmael: The Art of Partying: Art Basel in Miami (MSNBC) The Magnum photographer looks at the party-happy art crowd in Miami.

TIME’s Best Photojournalism of 2014 (TIME LightBox) Collection of great photojournalism that has appeared in print and online during the past 12 months, by photographers such as James Nachtwey, Lynsey Addario, Yuri Kozyrev and others.

Anastasia Taylor-Lind: Fighters and Mourners of the Ukrainian Revolution (TED) Powerful TED talk by the British-Swedish photographer on her portraits from the Maidan square in Kiev.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 9, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Benjamin Lowy‘s photographs from one of the world’s most prestigious show-jumping competitions, Masters Grand Slam Indoor, which held its inaugural American edition in the City of Angels in September. The work is a fascinating look at the event that drew horses from around the world – some 50 were flown in from Europe – and where the VIP stands were full of champagne-sipping and caviar-eating celebrities (Note: The pictures that capture the horses before their long-haul Transatlantic flight, were taken by Maciek Nabrdalik).

Benjamin Lowy: Flying Horses Don’t Come Cheap (ESPN)

Minzayar: China’s Expanding Middle Class Fuels Poaching, Decadence in Myanmar (National Geographic News) These photographs show how endangered animals are being sold as aphrodisiacs, traditional medicines, and gastronomic delicacies in a remote Burmese city.

Top 10 Photos of 2014 (TIME LightBox) The most influential photos of the year as selected by the magazine’s photo editors.

New Photobooks (The New York Times Book Review) Luc Sante reviews some new photobooks for the holiday season, including ones on the works of Vivian Maier, Paul Strand, Henri-Cartier Bresson, and Eugene Richards.

John Moore on covering the Ebola epidemic in Liberia (Getty Images) Insightful and moving video about the Getty photographer’s Ebola coverage.

LIFE Photographer Ralph Morse Dies at 97 (LIFE.com)

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 8, 2014

Photojournalism Daily is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Carlos Javier Ortiz‘s work on gun violence in Chicago. While violent crime has fallen nationally, progress has proven difficult in the Windy City, with more than a murder a day on average this year. The number of shooting incidents has actually increased and minority communities continue to be disproportionally affected. Ortiz has covered the gun violence in his native city for nearly a decade and recently published a book on the subject, called We All We Got. These latest photographs, taken on assignment for Al Jazeera America, are a devastating testimony on this modern-day plague.


Carlos Javier Ortiz: 30 shootings in 3 days (Al Jazeera America)

Don Bartletti: Product of Mexico (The Los Angeles Times Framework) Powerful photographs on the hard work and deplorable living conditions of some of Mexico’s farm workers. | See also the entire article.

Robert Frank’s Photos of America Still Feel As Poignant As They Did 60 Years Ago (Mother Jones) A new exhibit at Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center shows more than 100 of more or less unknown of the Swiss master’s photographs from the 1950s, along with 22 from The Americans. A catalogue of the show is printed by Steidl under the title Robert Frank in America.

Arthur Leipzig, Photographer of Everyday Life in New York, Dies at 96 (The New York Times)

Stephen Crowley (Photo District News) Straight-talking interview with the New York Times‘ politics photographer.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 5, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Andrew Quilty‘s work on Pakistani refugees in Afghanistan. Some 100,000 civilians fled the Pakistani military’s offensive against insurgents in North Waziristan this past summer by seeking shelter across the border in Afghanistan. More than 3,000 families ended up at the Gulan Refugee Camp in Gurbuz District in Khost, only to find out another danger was lurking underneath their feet. It turned out the camp is located above a decades old minefield from the time muhajideen were fighting the Russians. Quilty’s compelling photographs capture these unfortunate refugees haunted by weapons of an old war.


Andrew Quilty: Finding Refuge on a Mine Field (Foreign Policy)

William Daniels: Fighting Over the Spoils of War in Central African Republic (Al Jazeera America) These photographs show how natural riches play a part in the conflict often seen purely in ethnic terms | Part of a series of posts on Central African Republic.

Best Photos of the Year 2014 (Reuters)

War’s effect on peace is examined in new Tate show (Phaidon) Tate Modern curator Shoair Mavlian talks about the new exhibition Conflict, Time, Photography.

Elena Chernyshova (Verve Photo) The World Press Photo award-winning Russian photographer writes about one of her photographs from Norilsk.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 4, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Associated Press photographer Rodrigo Abd’s work on illegal gold mining in Peru. The pictures are from La Pampa, located in the country’s Madre de Dios region, where mining has turned vast areas of untouched rainforest into a scarred, bare, and poisoned wasteland. The government is now trying to tackle the issue, but as Abd’s stunning monochrome panoramic photographs show us, even if they manage to curb illegal gold mining and halt deforestation, wounds inflicted on the land may never heal.

Rodrigo Abd: Peru’s Rainforest Turns to Wasteland From Illegal Gold Mining (NBC News)

Tim Matsui: Lisa: The Legacy of Human Trafficking (MSNBC) Incredibly intimate look at a young West Coast woman’s battle to leave a life of sex work and addiction. | Related feature film: The Long Night.

Souvid Datta: Documenting Drug Addiction in Kabul (TIME LightBox) A look at Afghanistan’s heroin epidemic through addicts and law-enforcement.

AP Photos of the Year 2014 (The Associated Press Images)

Photographing the Moments Between War and Peace (The New York Times Lens) Another look at James Hill’s new book, Somewhere Between War and Peace.

In other news, the 2015 World Photo Photo Contest is now open for entries.

Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.

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