TIME

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 5, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Dai Kurokawa’s work on poaching in Kenya, where elephants and rhinoceroses are targeted for their tusks and horns. The ivory and keratin are then used in souvenirs and jewelry, as well as medicine, particularly in Asia. This photograph of the mutilated corpse of a pregnant black rhinoceros is devastating. Fortunately, as Kurokawa’s other images show us, there are also efforts to protect them.


Dai Kurokawa: Poaching in Kenya (European Pressphoto Agency)

Simon Roberts: Tacloban: a year after typhoon Haiyan (The Guardian) A series of transition landscapes tracking the change in Tacloban, taken soon after the typhoon, and eight months later.

Brett Van Ort: Imaginary Battlefields (Wired Raw File) These photographs of paintball arenas in the United Kingdom and the U.S. resemble foreign battlefields from Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan, raising the issue of looking at war as entertainment.

Portraits of Those Braving Ebola (The New York Times Lens) Background information on how Daniel Berehulak executed his powerful portrait series that we highlighted in our post on Monday.

Ore Huiying (Verve Photo) The Singaporean photographer writes about her picture from Laos showing a part of the country’s one and only two-mile railway line.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 4, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marcus Bleasdale’s work on child marriage in Tanzania, East Africa, where four out of 10 girls marry before their 18th birthday. The photographs, made on assignment for Human Rights Watch, draw attention to young girls and women who have been pressured or forced to marry as adolescents and undergo female genital mutilation. It’s a blunt, compelling look at the hardships these girls face.


Marcus Bleasdale: Child Marriage in Tanzania (Human Right Watch)

Lynsey Addario: Amid Record Waves of Refugees, Italy Finding Limits to Its Compassion (National Geographic News) These photographs from Sicily show how the island has become the entry point for migrants trying to reach Europe by sea.

Tanya Habjouqa: Widows of Syrian ‘Freedom Fighters’ (The New York Times Lens) These pictures document the poverty and uncertainty faced by Syrian widows and their families in Jordan.

Luca Locatelli: Where Ferraris Are Born (Wired Raw File) Inside the famed car factory in Maranello, Italy.

Twelve Views on Israel (Le Monde) Pictures from a project, This Place, for which 12 international photographers were invited to document Israel. NB The post is in French. Also published on TIME LightBox in April 2014.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Nov. 3, 2014

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Daniel Berehulak’s extraordinary set of portraits of survivors and health workers at an Ebola treatment center in Suakoko, Liberia. The stunning and intimate black-and-white photographs, accompanied by telling quotes from his subjects, make for a powerful series and put a human face on the fight against this deadly virus.


Daniel Berehulak: Braving Ebola (The New York Times)

Kim Badawi: Gare du Nord in Disrepair (Bloomberg Businessweek) These photographs from Paris’s main train station show how it has become a magnet for homeless people, drug addicts, and illegal immigrants.

Ryan Lowry: Inside an American Steel Mill (Time.com) Documenting a rekindling American industry.

Muhammed Muheisen (The Guardian) The Associated Press photographer explains what it’s like to document Afghan refugees in Pakistan.

Sebastião Salgado (WNET) The photographer and his wife Lélia Wanick Salgado talk about the Genesis project, currently on display at New York’s International Center of Photography.


Photojournalism Links is a compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen, Associate Photo Editor at TIME. Follow him on Twitter @photojournalism.


TIME Middle East

U.N. Says 1 Million Syrian Refugees Are in Lebanon

The influx of Syrians, who now account for one-fourth of Lebanon's population, has immensely strained the nation’s political, economic and health care systems, reduced the quality of its infrastructure and pushed some schools past capacity

The Syrian civil war marked a grim milestone on Wednesday as the number of people who have fled into Lebanon and registered as refugees surpassed one million, according to the United Nations Refugees Agency.

The spiraling conflict that began in March 2011 has killed at least 150,000 people and uprooted more than nine million others. An estimated 1.6 million of them are spread between Turkey, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt. But it is fragile Lebanon that has by far taken the brunt.

One-quarter of the country’s residents are now Syrian, according to the U.N. There were almost 18,000 refugees in Lebanon in April 2012, about 13 months after the demonstrations, but that swelled to nearly 356,000 as the revolution turned into civil war. Now the organization registers 2,500 refugees each day.

UNHCR
UNHCR

Lebanon’s generally open-door policy for Syrians has immensely strained the tiny country’s political and economic systems, as well as its overall stability. There’s less trade, tourism and investment. Many schools are at full capacity—520,000 of the million refugees are children, but of the 400,000 of them who are school-aged, only 90,000 are in classrooms—and its infrastructure is stretched thin.

Bombings along the border serve as a reminder that even those who leave Syria in search of safety or better opportunities aren’t guaranteed anything.

(MORE: Ordeal of a Dying Child Captures the Tragedy of Syria)

Your browser, Internet Explorer 8 or below, is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites.

Learn how to update your browser