TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 14, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Robin Hammond‘s work on sandmining in Lagos, Nigeria, an urban hub that is Africa’s most populous metropolitan area. Most of the sand for the concrete used in construction comes from the bottom of the Lagos Lagoon. The photographs follow a group of sand diggers, who work like miners, except underwater. They navigate the lagoon on small boats, their sails constructed of rice sacks, and dig by hand before bringing their haul back ashore. Hammond’s striking pictures offer us a glimpse into the lives of those who play a crucial role in Lagos’ booming growth.

Robin Hammond: Life in Lagos: Building the City, One Bucket at a Time (National Geographic PROOF)

Andrew Testa: An Ancient Pastime With a Modern Twist (The New York Times) Fascinating series on camel racing with robots on their humps.

Amos Chapple: The Coldest Towns on Earth (The Wired Raw File) Shivering pictures from Russia’s Oymyakon and Yakutsk.

Matt Black: Almonds Suck California Dry (Mother Jones) These photographs capture California’s nut boom—in the midst of an epic drought.

Rian Dundon: A Homecoming in Oakland (TIME LightBox) The photographer documents his native California after having spent years away.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 13, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marco Gualazzini‘s work from Haiti. Published by CNN, they document the country’s state five years after it was hit by devastating 7.0-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 160,000 people, and left 1.5 million homeless. The excellent photographs capture Haiti’s enduring scars and hopes, but also signs of recovery.

Marco Gualazzini: Five years after the quake: Haiti at a crossroads (CNN)

Gael Turine: Haiti Earthquake: Five Years After (TIME LightBox) The pictures made during the last two years provide another view at the struggling country. For more on Haiti by other photographers, including Alex Webb, Maggie Steber, Paolo Woods and Bruce Gilden, see the LightBox post: Haiti: Photographers’ Love Affairs With a Country on the Brink.

Lee Grant: Life in North Korea (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Unusually upbeat look at the hermit kingdom.

Capturing the faces and feelings of Paris (CNN) Photographer Peter Turnley shares his photographs and thoughts from this past Sunday’s show of solidarity on the streets of the French capital.

‘A Long Hungry Look’: Forgotten Gordon Parks Photos Document Segregation (The New York Times) Rare Parks photos to be exhibited at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts starting Jan. 17.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 12, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Andrea Bruce‘s work from Cuba, made on assignment for the New York Times. They accompany a text by a correspondent who made a 17-hour, nearly 600-mile road trip across the island in a battered 1956 Ford. The photographs, shot in the south of the country, capture a struggling country, where many continue to rely on money sent by relatives abroad, horses are used for transportation and billboards still trumpet revolutionary slogans. But, there are also hints of change to the political system, with budding entrepreneurship. The words and pictures are a fascinating sliver into contemporary, slowly changing Cuba.

Andrea Bruce: Revealing a Slowly Changing Cuba (The New York Times)

Jerome Sessini: Beneath the Front Lines of the War in Eastern Ukraine (TIME LightBox) The photographs capture the region’s struggling coal industry, which has been hit hard by the current conflict.

Fabrice Fouillet: Colosses (Wired Raw File) Some of the world’s most imposing statues, seen from unusual angles.

Four deaths on a Gaza Beach: The images unseen (Al Jazeera America) Photo editor Mark Rykoff writes about graphic Gaza images, that no one wanted to publish.

God’s flock (British Journal of Photography) Another review of Jordi Ruiz Cirera’s photobook, Los Menonos, which depicts the Mennonite communities of eastern Bolivia.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 9, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Alex Maclean‘s aerial photographs of Detroit. The work captures the contrasting fortunes and economic inequality between the depopulated areas (defined by vacant lots and boarded-up homes) and the wealth of some surrounding areas (mansions and manicured lawns). It can appear bleak, but there’s cause for optimism as Detroit’s worst decline appears to be slowing, evident by new green spaces and corporate investment. Maclean’s pictures offer an excellent and insightful bird’s-eye view on the struggles of Motor City and its fight to survive.

Alex S. MacLean: Detroit by Air (The New York Times)

In Memoriam: Remembering the Photographers We Lost in 2014 (TIME LightBox)

An Intern Learns to Swim in the Deep End (National Geographic PROOF) Sara Lewkowicz won a three-month internship at National Geographic when she came out on top at last year’s College Photographer of the Year competition. She talks about her experience and shares photographs she made during her internship project in Mexico.

John Moore (BBC Radio 4 World at One) The Getty photographer is interviewed about his Ebola coverage in Liberia. See TIME LightBox interview as well.

David Burnett (Photo Brigade) The legendary photographer talks about his career at length.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 8, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Charles Mostoller‘s series on teen horseback riders in urban Philadelphia. The photographer documented young men, working at the stables southwest, who take care of the horses, clean the facilities and earn a little bit of pocket money by offering cheap pony rides. Their main reward, though, is the right to take the horses out themselves. Mostoller’s pictures offer a fascinating glimpse into these young cowboys, riding in one of the most unexpected settings: the concrete jungle.

Charles Mostoller: The Concrete Cowboys of Philadelphia (The Wall Street Journal)

Anonymous and Meridith Kohut: Cuba’s Economic Fortunes May be Slow to Turn (The New York Times) These photographs capture Cuba’s capital, desperately awaiting change.

Celebrating 80 Years of Associated Press’ Wirephoto (TIME LightBox) A look back at the history of Associated Press’ Wirephoto.

Why it pays to work the fringes (Columbia Journalism Review) Insightful look at Lynsey Addario’s biography, It’s What I Do.

2014 and Beyond: Philip Montgomery (American Photo) The magazine picks Montgomery as one of the top talents to follow in the years to come.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 7, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Adam Dean‘s work on opium poppy farming in the valleys of eastern Burma. The country, which used to be the world’s largest supplier of heroin until the 1980s, is experiencing a resurgence in cultivation. Conflict, corruption and poverty have driven an increasing number of farmers back to growing the plants’ opium sap, the key ingredient of the drug. The United Nations is trying to persuade them to switch their focus to other crops such as coffee, but it faces a difficult task: opium is far more profitable and an easier way for smalltime farmers to pad their incomes. Dean’s photographs offer a poignant glimpse to the boom that gives so many of Burma’s poor a hard fought livelihood, one that they know isn’t good for society but one that they aren’t eager to give up.

Adam Dean: Poppies Bloom Again in Myanmar (The New York Times)

Timothy Fadek: Rebuilding Haiti (Bloomberg Businessweek) These pictures take a different look at Haiti by showing how five years after the massive earthquake, businesses are working to rebuild the country

Muhammed Muheisen: Young Survivors of the Peshawar School Attack (TIME LightBox) Portraits and words of the students who survived

Glenna Gordon (BBC Radio 4 World at One) Gordon talks about photographing the clothes of missing Nigerian school girls.

Jane Bown obituary (The Guardian) The English photographer known for her portraits, died in December 2014 aged 89

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 6, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marcus Bleasdale‘s work from Central African Republic for an in-depth account of the country’s spiral into bloodshed by Peter Bouckaert of Human Rights Watch, with whom the photographer has covered the country since November 2013. The most recent conflict erupted after the now-disbanded Séléka coalition of Muslim rebels ousted the Christian president in early 2013 and began a vicious campaign of looting, torture and murder, mostly against non-Muslims. Two days of street violence in December 2013 left hundreds dead and shocked the global community into action, with French and African peacekeepers sent in to restore security. But the retaliation by armed militia groups known as anti-balaka bred even more death and, in many cases, targetted the Muslim minority, prompting an exodus into the eastern region and neighboring countries. Bleasdale’s images provide an important and harrowing documentation of turmoil that has, in recent months, largely been ignored.

Marcus Bleasdale: The Unravelling – Journey Through The Central African Republic Crisis (Human Rights Watch)

Lucas Jackson: U.S. Military’s Last Days of Combat in Afghanistan (TIME.com) The Reuters photographer documented the final days of the U.S.’s official combat campaign in the country

The Influencers: Lynsey Addario (American Photo) The magazine features Addario as one of the five most influential photographers of the last 25 years

2014 The Year in Pictures (The New York Times) See also the Lens blog article, Choosing the Pictures of the Year, in which photo editors Meagham Looram and Jeffrey Scales explain the thinking behind the selection

Cartier-Bresson’s classic is back – but his Decisive Moment has passed (The Guardian) Sean O’Hagan writes somewhat critically about the re-printing of Cartier-Bresson’s seminal book, six decades on

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 5, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Daniel Berehulak‘s stunning work from Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone for a comprehensive New York Times account that charts the devastating resurgence of Ebola in West Africa last year. One of the photographs captures the Guinean village where a one-year-old boy, considered to be Patient Zero of the outbreak, died just over a year ago. It’s both painterly yet haunting, as it captures the birth place of a health crisis that has led to thousands of deaths.

Daniel Berehulak: How Ebola Roared Back (The New York Times) See also the slideshow: Ebola Ravages Economies in West Africa

Ross McDonnell: Notes from Underground (TIME LightBox) Pictures show civilians in eastern Ukraine sheltering in Cold War era bunkers

Brendan Hoffman (BBC Radio 4 World at One) Hoffman about his work in Ukraine and on the MH17 crash site

Toward A New Documentary Expression (Aperture) Stephen Mayes reflects on documentary photography’s shifting terrain

PhotoBooks 2014 (Vogue Italia) The magazine asked photo editors, artists, photographers and photography experts to choose the photobooks that defined the year

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 18, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Melissa Lyttle‘s work from the tiny southern Caribbean island of Curaçao, which has become an unlikely breeding ground of major league baseball players. The autonomous territory, which is linked to the Netherlands, is twice the size of Brooklyn, and has a population of 150,000. But in baseball, it’s a giant: in 2014 alone, it had seven players in the MLB, making Curaçao the land with the most major leaguers per capita in the world this last season. One of them, Didi Grigious, is likely to succeed Yankees legend Derek Jeter as the team’s new shortstop. Lyttle’s photographs capture a fascinating glimpse of the island; its notoriously rocky fields and future talent.

Melissa Lyttle: An Unlikely Source of Big Talent (The New York Times)

Lynn Johnson: The First Year (National Geographic) These compelling photographs document children’s early development.

Julian Röder: Mission and Task (Wired Rawfile) These pictures capture the officers and equipment that European Union uses to guard its borders.

Top 100 Photos of 2014 (TIME LightBox)

2014 Photos of the Year (Mashable)

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Dec. 17, 2014

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Tyler Hicks‘ work aboard the USS Carl Vinson aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf, one of the launch pads of the U.S.-led air campaign against the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS). More than a dozen warplanes take off from the carrier every day for missions over Iraq and Syria. The five-acre ship, with a crew of more than 5,000, has long played a role in the U.S.’s fight against terrorism. Some of the first air strikes of the Afghan war in 2001 were made by jets that took off from the Vinson, and it was on that same ship that, in 2011, Navy SEALs brought Osama bin Laden’s body after a raid in Pakistan, and buried it at sea. Hicks’ photographs offer an intriguing look at this massive symbol of American military power in the Middle East.

Tyler Hicks: A Desert War on ISIS, Fought From a Floating City (The New York Times)

Kirsten Luce: Documenting Immigration From Both Sides of the Border (TIME LightBox) Powerful photographs of migrants trying to enter the U.S. and the border patrols trying to catch them.

Robin Hammond: Lagos Portraits (National Geographic) Compelling portraits of Lagosians presented alongside their take on the city.

The Year in Pictures: 2014 (NBC News)

John Stanmeyer (Vogue Italy) Insightful interview with the World Press Photo of the Year 2013 winner.

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