TIME Photojournalism Links

The 10 Best Photo Essays of the Month

A compilation of the 10 most interesting photo essays published online in April, as curated by Mikko Takkunen

This month’s Photojournalism Links collection highlights 10 excellent photo essays from across the world, including The New York Times staff photographer Damon Winter’s stunning aerial pictures documenting the ongoing drought in California.

Damon Winter: California Drought (The New York Times)

Bryan Denton: 100 Years Later, a Genocide Haunts the Armenian Psyche (The New York Times) These compelling pictures capture sites related to the Armenian genocide that took place one hundred years ago.

Newsha Tavakolian: Women Taking the Battle to ISIS (TIME LightBox) Powerful series on a cadre of female Kurdish soldiers fighting Islamic militants in Syria.

David Guttenfelder: Harnessing the Mekong (National Geographic) National Geographic Photography Fellow Guttenfelder’s work documents life along the Mekong River in five different countries.

Adriane Ohanesian: Inside Sudan’s War-Torn Darfur (TIME LightBox) These rare pictures capture rebels and fleeing civilians in Darfur.

Wayne Lawrence: Taking Back Detroit (National Geographic) Portraits and audio of Motor City residents.

James Mollison: Playground (Wired) Fascinating, insightful photographs of children’s playgrounds around world.

Moises Saman: Digging for Gold in the Andes (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Magnum photographer documents the unregulated gold mining in the Peruvian Andes.

Katie Orlinsky: Taken at the Border (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Orlinsky documents the U.S.-Mexico border from empty stash houses to young migrants who have been extorted.

Christopher Griffith: Foot Soldiers (The New York Times Magazine) Excellent photographs of Manhattan shoe shiners’ hands.

TIME Photojournalism Links

The 10 Best Photo Essays of the Month

A compilation of the 10 most interesting photo essays published online in March, as curated by Mikko Takkunen

This month’s Photojournalism Links collection highlights 10 excellent photo essays from across the world, including Matt Black‘s work from Guerrero state in Mexico. Black has documented impoverished indigenous communities in southern Mexico for years. This latest work captures communities affected by rampant crime and poverty, including the disappearance of the 43 students from a school in Iguala. The black-and-white photographs are extraordinary and the accompanying short-film, which includes a moving letter from a mother to his lost son, is definitely worth watching. The reporting was supported by a grant from the Pulitzer Center.

Matt Black: Guerrero and the Disappeared (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Watch “The Monster in the Mountains,” a short film based on Black’s work in Guerrero.

Adam Ferguson: The Deadly Global War for Sand (Wired) These stunning photographs document sand mining in India.

Lynsey Addario: India’s Insurgency (National Geographic) Addario’s pictures capture mineral-rich eastern Indian states, plagued by poverty and a continuing Maoist insurgency.

Josh Haner: The Ride of Their Lives (The New York Times) A fantastic year-long project that follows three generations of one rodeo-mad family | More on the Lens blog

Yuri Kozyrev: Cuba (TIME LightBox) TIME contract photographer’s beautiful work from the Cuban capital.

Mathias Depardon: Gold Rivers (TIME LightBox) Construction of the hydroelectric Ilisu Dam in Turkey threatens a cultural treasure.

Lynsey Addario: Afghan Policewomen Struggle Against Culture (The New York Times) A compelling series on Afghani women determined to make a difference.

Newsha Tavakolian: Stress and Hope in Tehran (The New York Times) These excellent portraits paired with insightful quotes give us a peek inside the minds of Iranians.

Eugene Richards: Lincoln (National Geographic) Richards’ photographs trail the assassinated president’s last journey home in 1865 and raise questions about his life and legacy.

Matteo Bastianelli: Young Syrian Refugee’s Journey Through Europe (MSNBC) The Italian photographer has documented a Syrian refugee’s life in Bulgaria and journey to Germany. | More on his agency’s website

TIME Photojournalism Links

The 10 Best Photo Essays of the Month

A compilation of the 10 most interesting photo essays published online in February, as curated by Mikko Takkunen

This month’s Photojournalism Links collection highlights 10 excellent photo essays from across the world, including Stephanie Sinclair‘s work on child and underage brides in Guatemala in the latest installment of her decade-long project spanning 10 countries to document the issue of child marriage around the world. In Guatemala, over half of all girls are married before 18, and over 10% under 15. Many girls marry men far older than themselves, end up withdrawing from school and become mothers long before they are physically and emotionally ready. Sinclair’s powerful pictures and accompanying video capture Guatemalan girls trying to come to terms with the harsh realities of early motherhood, especially for those who have been abandoned by their husbands.

Stephanie Sinclair: Child, Bride, Mother (The New York Times) See also the Too Young To Wed website.

Sebastian Liste: The Media Doesn’t Care What Happens Here (The New York Times Magazine) These photographs capture a group of amateur journalists trying to cover the violence in one of the largest urban slums in Brazil, Complexo do Alemão in Rio de Janeiro.

Ross McDonnell: Inside the Frozen Trenches of Eastern Ukraine (TIME LightBox) The Irish photographer documented the Ukrainian soldiers in the week preceding the most recent, fragile cease-fire.

Sergey Ponomarev: Pro-Russian fighters in the ruins of Donetsk airport (The Globe and Mail) Haunting scenes of the Pro-Russian held remains of Donetsk airport.

Alex Majoli: Athens (National Geographic) The Magnum photographer captures the people of Greece’s struggling capital for the magazine’s Two Cities, Two Europes feature on Athens and Berlin.

Gerd Ludwig: Berlin (National Geographic) Ludwig documents Germany’s booming capital for the magazine’s Two Cities, Two Europes feature on Athens and Berlin.

John Stanmeyer: Fleeing Terror, Finding Refuge (National Geographic) These photographs show the desperate conditions facing Syrian refugees in Turkey.

Edmund Clark: The Mountains Of Majeed (Wired RawFile) The British photographer’s latest book is the Bagram Airfield U.S. Military base in Afghanistan, which one held the infamous detention facility. Also published on TIME LightBox.

Sarker Protick: What Remains (The New Yorker Photo Booth) This moving, beautiful series documents the photographer’s grandparents. The work was recently awarded 2nd Prize in the Daily Life stories category in the World Press Photo 2015 contest.

Muhammed Muheisen: Leading a Double Life in Pakistan (The Washington Post In Sight) The Associated Press photographer captures a group of cross-dressers and transgender Pakistani men to offer a glimpse of a rarely seen side of the conservative country.

TIME Photojournalism Links

The 10 Best Photo Essays of the Month

A compilation of the 10 most interesting photo essays published online in January, as curated by Mikko Takkunen

This month’s Photojournalism Links collection highlights 10 excellent photo essays from across the world spanning five continents, including Pete Muller‘s powerful work shot in the Ebola-ridden Sierra Leone. His two sets of photographs, featured below, were made on assignment for National Geographic, and are the first two in a four-part series examining the epidemic in West Africa. Muller’s pictures document the battle fought by medical workers, body collectors, and burial teams to bring the crisis ravaging Freetown and the country, under control. The story and images from the city’s King Tom cemetery are particularly harrowing; in just a few months, it has been expanded to three times its former size and the large number of fresh burial mounds make it look more like a construction site than a typical graveyard.

Pete Muller: How Ebola Found Fertile Ground in Sierra Leone’s Chaotic Capital | How the Fight Against Ebola Tested a Culture’s Traditions (National Geographic News)

Uriel Sinai: In Africa, Mosquito Nets Are Putting Fish at Risk (The New York Times) These stunning photographs by Uriel Sinai from Kenya, Tanzania, and Zambia, show how mosquito nets meant for Malaria protection have ended up being widely used in fishing, since they are cheaper than actual fishing nets and can be even more effective, especially in shallow waters.

Andy Spyra: The enemy within: Boko Haram’s reign of terror across Northern Nigeria | The enemy within: A closer look at survivors of Boko Haram attacks across Northern Nigeria (The Washington Post In Sight) The German photographer has spent more than three years documenting the northern Nigeria. His pictures provide a rare view into communities under Boko Haram’s terror.

Mosa’ab Elshamy: Exploring the Mawlids of Egypt (TIME LightBox) These excellent photographs capture spiritual celebrations within Egyptian Sufism.

Manu Brabo: In Ukraine, The Frozen Tears of Donetsk (Paris Match L’Instant) The Spanish photographer, known for his work in Syria, is now in Ukraine to document the upsurge in fighting. | See also Brabo’s work on the MSNBC and Al Jazeera America websites

Lynn Johnson: Healing Soldiers (The National Geographic) Compelling portraits of U.S. soldiers treating their war traumas by participating in art therapy, where they create painted masks to express how they feel. The images painted on them symbolize themes such as death, physical pain, and patriotism.

George Steinmetz: Treading Water (The National Geographic) These pictures from Florida’s southeastern coastline capture a region with a lot to lose as sea levels continue to rise.

Álvaro Laiz: Ninjas: Gold Rush In Mongolia (Wired Raw File) These photographs document the hard and dangerous work of amateur gold miners.

Mark Abramson: An Immigrant’s Dream for a Better Life (The New York Times Lens) Extraordinary, in-depth photo essay that follows the life of a young Mexican immigrant woman and her family in California.

Emanuele Satolli: In the Bag for North (TIME LightBox) Revealing still life images of Central American migrants’ sparse belonging on their journey toward the United States.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 14, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Robin Hammond‘s work on sandmining in Lagos, Nigeria, an urban hub that is Africa’s most populous metropolitan area. Most of the sand for the concrete used in construction comes from the bottom of the Lagos Lagoon. The photographs follow a group of sand diggers, who work like miners, except underwater. They navigate the lagoon on small boats, their sails constructed of rice sacks, and dig by hand before bringing their haul back ashore. Hammond’s striking pictures offer us a glimpse into the lives of those who play a crucial role in Lagos’ booming growth.

Robin Hammond: Life in Lagos: Building the City, One Bucket at a Time (National Geographic PROOF)

Andrew Testa: An Ancient Pastime With a Modern Twist (The New York Times) Fascinating series on camel racing with robots on their humps.

Amos Chapple: The Coldest Towns on Earth (The Wired Raw File) Shivering pictures from Russia’s Oymyakon and Yakutsk.

Matt Black: Almonds Suck California Dry (Mother Jones) These photographs capture California’s nut boom—in the midst of an epic drought.

Rian Dundon: A Homecoming in Oakland (TIME LightBox) The photographer documents his native California after having spent years away.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 13, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Marco Gualazzini‘s work from Haiti. Published by CNN, they document the country’s state five years after it was hit by devastating 7.0-magnitude earthquake that killed more than 160,000 people, and left 1.5 million homeless. The excellent photographs capture Haiti’s enduring scars and hopes, but also signs of recovery.

Marco Gualazzini: Five years after the quake: Haiti at a crossroads (CNN)

Gael Turine: Haiti Earthquake: Five Years After (TIME LightBox) The pictures made during the last two years provide another view at the struggling country. For more on Haiti by other photographers, including Alex Webb, Maggie Steber, Paolo Woods and Bruce Gilden, see the LightBox post: Haiti: Photographers’ Love Affairs With a Country on the Brink.

Lee Grant: Life in North Korea (The New Yorker Photo Booth) Unusually upbeat look at the hermit kingdom.

Capturing the faces and feelings of Paris (CNN) Photographer Peter Turnley shares his photographs and thoughts from this past Sunday’s show of solidarity on the streets of the French capital.

‘A Long Hungry Look’: Forgotten Gordon Parks Photos Document Segregation (The New York Times) Rare Parks photos to be exhibited at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts starting Jan. 17.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 12, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Andrea Bruce‘s work from Cuba, made on assignment for the New York Times. They accompany a text by a correspondent who made a 17-hour, nearly 600-mile road trip across the island in a battered 1956 Ford. The photographs, shot in the south of the country, capture a struggling country, where many continue to rely on money sent by relatives abroad, horses are used for transportation and billboards still trumpet revolutionary slogans. But, there are also hints of change to the political system, with budding entrepreneurship. The words and pictures are a fascinating sliver into contemporary, slowly changing Cuba.

Andrea Bruce: Revealing a Slowly Changing Cuba (The New York Times)

Jerome Sessini: Beneath the Front Lines of the War in Eastern Ukraine (TIME LightBox) The photographs capture the region’s struggling coal industry, which has been hit hard by the current conflict.

Fabrice Fouillet: Colosses (Wired Raw File) Some of the world’s most imposing statues, seen from unusual angles.

Four deaths on a Gaza Beach: The images unseen (Al Jazeera America) Photo editor Mark Rykoff writes about graphic Gaza images, that no one wanted to publish.

God’s flock (British Journal of Photography) Another review of Jordi Ruiz Cirera’s photobook, Los Menonos, which depicts the Mennonite communities of eastern Bolivia.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 9, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Alex Maclean‘s aerial photographs of Detroit. The work captures the contrasting fortunes and economic inequality between the depopulated areas (defined by vacant lots and boarded-up homes) and the wealth of some surrounding areas (mansions and manicured lawns). It can appear bleak, but there’s cause for optimism as Detroit’s worst decline appears to be slowing, evident by new green spaces and corporate investment. Maclean’s pictures offer an excellent and insightful bird’s-eye view on the struggles of Motor City and its fight to survive.

Alex S. MacLean: Detroit by Air (The New York Times)

In Memoriam: Remembering the Photographers We Lost in 2014 (TIME LightBox)

An Intern Learns to Swim in the Deep End (National Geographic PROOF) Sara Lewkowicz won a three-month internship at National Geographic when she came out on top at last year’s College Photographer of the Year competition. She talks about her experience and shares photographs she made during her internship project in Mexico.

John Moore (BBC Radio 4 World at One) The Getty photographer is interviewed about his Ebola coverage in Liberia. See TIME LightBox interview as well.

David Burnett (Photo Brigade) The legendary photographer talks about his career at length.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 8, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Charles Mostoller‘s series on teen horseback riders in urban Philadelphia. The photographer documented young men, working at the stables southwest, who take care of the horses, clean the facilities and earn a little bit of pocket money by offering cheap pony rides. Their main reward, though, is the right to take the horses out themselves. Mostoller’s pictures offer a fascinating glimpse into these young cowboys, riding in one of the most unexpected settings: the concrete jungle.

Charles Mostoller: The Concrete Cowboys of Philadelphia (The Wall Street Journal)

Anonymous and Meridith Kohut: Cuba’s Economic Fortunes May be Slow to Turn (The New York Times) These photographs capture Cuba’s capital, desperately awaiting change.

Celebrating 80 Years of Associated Press’ Wirephoto (TIME LightBox) A look back at the history of Associated Press’ Wirephoto.

Why it pays to work the fringes (Columbia Journalism Review) Insightful look at Lynsey Addario’s biography, It’s What I Do.

2014 and Beyond: Philip Montgomery (American Photo) The magazine picks Montgomery as one of the top talents to follow in the years to come.

TIME Photojournalism Links

Photojournalism Daily: Jan. 7, 2015

A compilation of the most interesting photojournalism found on the web, curated by Mikko Takkunen

Today’s daily Photojournalism Links collection highlights Adam Dean‘s work on opium poppy farming in the valleys of eastern Burma. The country, which used to be the world’s largest supplier of heroin until the 1980s, is experiencing a resurgence in cultivation. Conflict, corruption and poverty have driven an increasing number of farmers back to growing the plants’ opium sap, the key ingredient of the drug. The United Nations is trying to persuade them to switch their focus to other crops such as coffee, but it faces a difficult task: opium is far more profitable and an easier way for smalltime farmers to pad their incomes. Dean’s photographs offer a poignant glimpse to the boom that gives so many of Burma’s poor a hard fought livelihood, one that they know isn’t good for society but one that they aren’t eager to give up.

Adam Dean: Poppies Bloom Again in Myanmar (The New York Times)

Timothy Fadek: Rebuilding Haiti (Bloomberg Businessweek) These pictures take a different look at Haiti by showing how five years after the massive earthquake, businesses are working to rebuild the country

Muhammed Muheisen: Young Survivors of the Peshawar School Attack (TIME LightBox) Portraits and words of the students who survived

Glenna Gordon (BBC Radio 4 World at One) Gordon talks about photographing the clothes of missing Nigerian school girls.

Jane Bown obituary (The Guardian) The English photographer known for her portraits, died in December 2014 aged 89

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