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Older worker
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Old People Should Be Part of NYC Workforce: Report

Mar 20, 2015
TIME Health
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A skilled-labor shortage has left small businesses across the country scrambling to fill positions and New York City health organizations say there's a simple solution: hire older workers.

"Hiring, retaining and using older workers strategically can solve a variety of pressing problems that employers in our city face," said Shauneequa Owusu, a health policy expert at the New York Academy of Medicine, which co-produced a new report with the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center at Columbia University and the Mayor's office's Age-Friendly New York City.

Read more: The New Age of Much Older Age

The report, published Wednesday, suggests that workers 55 or older can bring skill and expertise while only requiring minimal adjustment on the part of small businesses (technology training can get older workers up to speed quickly, the report found). At the same time, research suggests the workplace can benefit from age diversity, too. "There is evidence that mixed age teams in the workplace are more productive than teams of workers of the same age," the authors write.

"Many of the older adults that we speak with want and need to work. Furthermore, there’s growing evidence that it’s helpful to their healthy aging and wellbeing to continue working," said report author Ruth Finkelstein at Columbia's aging center. Recent research points to a clear association between being employed and improved mental, physical and emotional health, she said.

The finding comes as more and more Americans want to avoid a traditional work-free retirement. According to the new research, 700,000 workers are older than 55 in New York City alone, and many say they do not plan to retire conventionally.

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