TIME space

Watch Tonight’s Orionid Meteor Shower On This Livestream

A shower of 20 meteors-per-hour begins at 8 p.m. ET

Watch live Tuesday night as 20 meteors-per-hour light up the night sky as part of the Orionid Meteor Shower, a spectacle that occurs each year as the earth moves through debris left behind by a comet.

“Earth is passing through a stream of debris from Halley’s Comet, the source of the Orionids,” said Bill Cooke of NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office in a press release. “Bits of comet dust hitting the atmosphere should give us a couple dozen of meteors per hour.”

While this shower may not be the strongest of the year, the position of nearby stars makes it one of the best to watch, Cooke added.

The show will be livestreamed from the Slooh Community Observatory beginning at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT and will be hosted by expert astronomer Bob Berman.

TIME ebola

U.S. Will Restrict Travel From Ebola-Hit West African Countries to 5 Airports

IINTERNATIONAL PASSENGERS BEING SCREENED FOR MEDICAL CONDITIONS RELATED TO EBOLA AT  THE CHICAGO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT BY MEMBERS OF THE US CUSTOMS AND BOARDER PATROL AND A US COAST GUARD MEDICAL TEAM, BOTH PART OF THE US DEPARTMENT HOMELAND SECURITY. THE
U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers conduct enhanced screening at JFK International Airport in New York City on October 11, 2014. Donna Burton—UPI/CBP/Landov

Fliers from Ebola-affected countries must travel to New York, Newark, Washington, Atlanta or Chicago

The Department of Homeland Security announced Tuesday that airline passengers traveling to the United States from the the countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak must travel through one of five U.S. airports, where they will undergo screening.

The new restrictions take effect Wednesday and expand on a previous requirement that passengers whose travel plans originate in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone must undergo screening if they arrive at airports in New York, Newark, Washington, Atlanta or Chicago. Now, passengers must modify their itinerary to ensure they arrive at one of the five airports where they can be screened.

Though the tighter security measure is symbolically significant, it will likely only impact a small minority of travelers who arrive in the U.S. from West Africa. More than 9o% of passengers from the affected countries already arrive at those five airports via air connections in Europe or elsewhere in Africa. There are currently no direct flights from Liberia, Guinea or Sierra Leone to the U.S.

In a statement, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said that the agency would continue monitoring the situation to determine whether additional restrictions are necessary.

Read next: Texas Tells Ebola Health Care Workers Not to Travel

TIME Cancer

Study Links Latina Women With Gene That Lowers Breast Cancer Risk

Some Latina women have a gene that significantly lowers the risk of getting breast cancer, according to a new study.

The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that the gene is most effective at protecting against the variations of the disease that lead to the worst prognosis.

Researchers at the University of California San Francisco reported that 20% of self-identified Latinas had one copy of the gene, which led to 40% reduced risk of breast cancer. The 1% of Latinas who had two copies of the gene were about 80% less likely to have breast cancer, the study found.

Other medical research has shown that Latina women have lower a incidence of breast cancer than women with other backgrounds, but it wasn’t clear from what caused the disparity.

“After our earliest studies, we thought there might be a genetic variant that led to increased risk in European populations,” said UCSF professor and study author Elad Ziv in a press release. “But what this latest work shows is that instead there is a protective variant in Native American and Latina populations.”

Mammograms conducted for the study showed that women with the genetic variation had less dense breast tissue, which is thought to correlate with reduced breast cancer risk.

“We have detected something that is definitely relevant to the health of Latinas,” said Laura Fejerman, UCSF assistant professor and an author of the study, in a press release. “As a Latina myself, I am gratified that there are representatives of that population directly involved in research that concerns them.”

TIME ebola

Ebola Vaccine Testing Could Start Soon

WHO hopes for clinical trials to begin in January

An Ebola vaccine could begin testing in the next few weeks and be ready for clinical trials in West Africa by January, the World Health Organization announced Tuesday.

Still, questions remain about when the drug may be available for the public at large and how many doses will be available, according to CNN.

“It will be deployed in the form of trials,” said WHO official Marie Paule Kieny, noting the number of available trials would be in the tens of thousands, not millions.

Initial tests will be available in countries like the United States and England before moving to West Africa, CNN reported.

Currently, there is no vaccine for Ebola, which has killed more than 4,500 people, almost entirely in West Africa, in the latest outbreak. Health officials have been working on a vaccine for years, and now have expedited their efforts in the face of the current crisis.

[CNN]

TIME Research

Scientists Pinpoint Why Some People Are ‘SAD’ in Winter

"We believe that we have found the dial the brain turns when it has to adjust serotonin to the changing seasons"

Difficulty regulating a chemical in the brain may explain why some people suffer from season affective disorder (SAD), according to new research.

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, who studied brain scans from more than 30 subjects, found that SAD patients had different levels of a neurotransmitter that regulates serotonin in their brains during winter and summer months, the BBC reports. Serotonin is thought to signal happiness in the brain, and, during the winter, the neurotransmitter that removes serotonin was present at higher levels.

“We believe that we have found the dial the brain turns when it has to adjust serotonin to the changing seasons,” lead researcher Brenda McMahon told the BBC.

The research confirms what other studies have suggested. “SERT fluctuations associated with SAD have been seen in previous studies,” European College of Neuropsychophar­macology professor Siegfried Kasper said. “But this is the first study to follow patients through summer and winter comparisons.”

[BBC]

TIME Aviation

Airlines Hike Prices on Domestic Flights

JetBlue initiated the $4 fare increase

The five biggest U.S. airlines all increased their base fare on domestic flights in the past week, despite declining fuel prices and apprehension over the potential spread of Ebola.

JetBlue initiated a $4 fare increase last Thursday, and United, Delta, American and Southwest followed suit, the Associated Press reports.

Though the airlines are trying to boost revenue with an across-the-board price increase, the effect it will have on the average consumer is less clear. Even with a base fare increase, airlines change prices frequently to adjust for evolving demand.

The move comes despite a slip in fuel prices (one of an airline’s largest expenses) and worldwide fear over Ebola. Both factors might seem to give airlines reasons to cut fares.

Wall Street seemed to reward the price increase with shares in the major airlines all gaining by at least 3%.

[AP]

TIME Bizarre

Russian Artist Cuts Off Earlobe in Government Protest

He previously nailed his scrotum to the stones in Red Square

Less than a year after nailing his scrotum to the cobblestones of Red Square, a Russian artist cut off his earlobe Sunday in protest of the Russian government’s treatment of dissidents.

The artist, Pyotr Pavlensky, was hospitalized following the incident and will be released from the hospital soon, The Guardian reported.

In a Facebook post, Pavlensky said that he was protesting the government’s alleged detention of dissidents under the false pretense of insanity.

“Armed with psychiatric diagnoses, the bureaucrat in a white lab coat cuts off from society those pieces that prevent him from establishing a monolithic dictate of a single, mandatory norm for everyone,” he wrote, according to the Guardian.

[Guardian]

TIME Race

State Senator Arrested in Ferguson Protest

Video shows her leading protest chants

A Missouri state senator was arrested during a protest in Ferguson Monday night following the continued outrage over a white officer’s shooting of an unarmed black teen in August.

State Senator Jamilah Nasheed, who represents sections of St. Louis, can be seen leading a protest chant in footage aired on local news channel KSDK, Reuters reports. “No Justice,” she yells in the video. The crowd replies, “No peace.”

On Aug. 9, police officer Darren Wilson shot multiple times and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown. The town has been on edge with near-daily protests since news first broke, but tensions have run especially high in recent days as a grand jury weighs whether to indict Wilson.

[Reuters]

TIME apps

Ads Are Coming to Snapchat for the First Time

Viewing the ads will be optional

Snapchat users will see ads on the messaging app starting this weekend, the social media company announced Friday.

“Understandably, a lot of folks want to know why we’re introducing advertisements to our service. The answer is probably unsurprising—we need to make money,” the company said in a blog post. “Advertising allows us to support our service while delivering neat content to Snapchatters.”

The company promised the ads wouldn’t display in people’s messages. “That would be totally rude,” Snapchat said. Instead, users will be able to choose whether to view the ads.

TIME celebrities

Justin Bieber Gets Boxing Lessons from Floyd Mayweather

Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a "good time"

Justin Bieber is getting boxing tips from world champion fighter Floyd Mayweather.

The 20-year-old singer posted a shirtless video to his Instagram account, in which he tosses practice punches in Mayweather’s direction and ducks the boxer’s slow returns.

No word on why Bieber is training to fight or why a world champion boxer would give lessons to a pop star, but given the celebrities’ numerous posts to social media, they both seemed to enjoy it. Mayweather wrote on Twitter that he had a “good time.”

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