TIME Television

Tina Fey Moves New Show to Netflix

Tina Fey and Ellie Kemper
Tina Fey and Ellie Kemper on May 12, 2014 in New York. Slaven Vlasic—Getty Images

Fey's relationship with NBC has extended more than a decade

Tina Fey is taking her show away from NBC.

The writer-actor-producer’s new series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt will now appear on Netflix instead, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Kimmy Schmidt stars Ellie Kemper from The Office as a woman who starts over in New York City after living in a cult.

Fey’s relationship with NBC has extended more than a decade. The television star first became famous as a performer on the channel’s Saturday Night Live program. She eventually became that show’s head writer before creating 30 Rock, another NBC show.

[THR]

TIME movies

Hear Jennifer Lawrence Sing in Mockingjay

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1
Jennifer Lawrence stars as ‘Katniss Everdeen’ in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 Murray Close—Lionsgate

The Academy Award-winning actress is pretty good

Jennifer Lawrence reportedly had so much trouble getting past her nerves that she cried when she had to sing “The Hanging Tree” in the latest installment of The Hunger Games.

“She’d probably tell you it was her least favorite day,” said Francis Lawrence, the movie’s director. “She was horrified to sing, she cried a little bit in the morning before she had to sing.”

But, as it turns out, the Academy Award-winning actress is pretty good.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 opens in theaters on Nov. 21.

 

 

 

TIME movies

Channing Tatum to Direct Young Adult Adaptation Leonard Peacock

Channing Tatum
Channing Tatum at the 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Jan. 12, 2014. George Pimentel—WireImage/Getty Images

Tatum has been moving toward more dramatic movies

Channing Tatum is set to co-direct and produce a film version of the young adult novel Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock with his filmmaking partner Reid Carolin, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The novel, written by Silver Linings Playbook author Matthew Quick, tells the story of Leonard Peacock and his plans to kill himself alongside his former best friend. There’s no word yet on who will adapt the novel for the screen.

MORE: Channing Tatum’s body of work

Made famous for his portrayal of hunky lead characters, Tatum has been moving toward more dramatic roles. In his new movie Foxcatcher, Tatum plays Olympic wrestler Mark Schultz. He may also take an acting role in Leonard Peacock.

[THR]

 

TIME Opinion

Ask an Ethicist: Can I Still Watch The Cosby Show?

Bill Cosby, Camille Cosby
Bill Cosby sits for an interview about the exhibit, Conversations: African and African-American Artworks in Dialogue, at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art in Washington on Nov. 6, 2014. Evan Vucci—AP

I can get over the fact that Martin Luther King, Jr. cheated on his wife, but I don’t care that the Nazis made the trains run on time. Making that call is a moral calculus: when do the negative aspects of a public figure outweigh the positive? Granted, in Bill Cosby’s case, we’re talking about a comedian, but the question is relevant for The Cosby Show‘s legacy. Should I think less of The Cosby Show‘s power to teach and to change perceptions of race in America if it turns out Bill Cosby is a rapist?

Like most people, when I first heard word of allegations that Bill Cosby had raped multiple women, I impulsively pushed them to the back of my mind. For me, The Cosby Show’s legacy is personal. As a kid, the young Huxtables were among the few children on television with faces that looked like mine living well-adjusted upper middle class existences that resembled my own. When I considered my Cosby experience alongside the actor’s on-screen persona, a doctor and family man who combined life lessons with old-fashioned humor, I intuitively knew that he couldn’t be a serial rapist.

But eventually emotion gave way to reason. Seven women with little to gain have reported that Cosby committed the same heinous crime, rape, in the same way. So if someone like me, a life long fan, believes these women, where does that leave The Cosby Show? Are all of Cosby’s indelible life lessons suddenly moot? Does secretly watching an episode when no one is around condone sex crimes?

To help me think through these questions, I turned to ethicists and academics.

First, there’s the question of morality versus art. To condemn his actions, do I also have to repudiate the man and his work? I took this up with Jeremy David Fix, a fellow at Harvard’s Safra Center for Ethics who studies moral philosophy: Would continuing to watch The Cosby Show harm anyone, even indirectly?

(MORE: So What Do We Do About The Cosby Show?)

On the one hand, watching the show helps in some small way line Bill Cosby’s pockets via residuals. On the other hand, with an estimated net worth of over $350 million at the age 77, he can already rest assured that he’ll live the rest of his life comfortably. But Harvard’s Fix asks a good question: What about the women who have been assaulted—what sort of message does it send if I keep supporting Cosby, even indirectly? I had to give up watching, I started to conclude. Otherwise, I might inadvertently send the signal that I think sexual assault is something that can be treated flippantly.

But how do I weigh the message that watching the show might send victims against the still-needed message that it sends to America at-large about race? I had finally stumped Fix. So I turned to historians and other thinkers to talk about the show’s legacy and whether it still has a positive role to play in discussions about race.

Joe Feagin, a sociologist who has written about The Cosby Show, talks eloquently about the indelible impression the show left on the country. Black Americans tend to celebrate the achievement of a top-rated show featuring a black cast in a positive light. They will probably keep doing that even if they condemn its creator. White Americans tend to celebrate the show as evidence that African-Americans can succeed in middle class life, Feagin said. While that view leaves society’s entrenched racism unaddressed, I’d still take Cosby over the Sanford and Son. Let’s face it, American residential communities are still largely racially homogenous, and it would certainly benefit future generations to see black families like the Huxtables.

So I tried to convince myself that somehow we could condemn Cosby’s rape message while continuing to watch the show. That is, I hoped we could separate Cliff Huxtable from Bill Cosby. But in the end, I don’t think we can any more. The two are so closely linked that as I tried to watch an episode of The Cosby Show this week, the image of Cliff kept reminding me of the actor’s pathetic silence in response to questions about the accusations him. If that distracted me, I can only imagine how an assault survivor would feel. The show has positively affected millions of Americans, and that legacy remains intact, but maybe it’s time for a new show to teach us about race. It’s a little overdue anyway.

TIME Crime

Los Angeles Schools to Pay $139 Million in Child Abuse Scandal

Mark Berndt, right, a former South Los Angeles-area elementary school teacher at Miramonte Elemenary during his arraignment in Los Angeles Municipal Court Metropolitan Branch on Feb. 21, 2012.
Mark Berndt, right, a former South Los Angeles-area elementary school teacher at Miramonte Elemenary during his arraignment in Los Angeles Municipal Court Metropolitan Branch on Feb. 21, 2012. Al Seib—AP

The settlement affects about 150 children

The Los Angeles public school system said Friday that it will pay $139 million to settle legal claims from students subjected to lewd sexual acts committed by a third-grade teacher.

The settlement with the Los Angeles Unified School District comes in a grisly case that has been ongoing since an employee at a photo development store uncovered inappropriate pictures of the teacher, Mark Berndt, with students in 2010. Berndt, a former teacher at Miramonte Middle School, pleaded no contest to charges of child abuse in 2013 and was sentenced to 25 years in prison. Parents of about 150 students filed legal claims arguing that the school district was negligent in protecting children.

“Throughout this case, we have shared in the pain felt by these children, their families and the community,” school superintendent Ramon C. Cortines said in a statement. “Each day, we are responsible for the safety of more than 600,000 students. There is a sacred trust put in us to protect the children we serve.”

TIME Crime

Michael Brown’s Family Calls for Calm as Ferguson Grand Jury Nears Decision

Police form a line opposite of protesters in front of the police station on Nov. 19, 2014.
Police form a line opposite of protesters in front of the police station on Nov. 19, 2014. Huy Mach—St. Louis Post-Dispatch/Polaris

"They do not advocate any violence, any looting, any rioting"

The family of the unarmed black teenager whose shooting death at the hands of a white police officer sparked violent protests in Ferguson, Mo., earlier this year appealed for calm Friday as a grand jury nears its decision on whether or not to charge the officer.

“They do not advocate any violence, any looting, any rioting,” Anthony Gray, an attorney for Michael Brown’s family, said during a news conference. The family called on Ferguson residents to keep their protests peaceful regardless of whether or not the grand jury charges Officer Darren Wilson in Brown’s death.

Ferguson has been on edge ahead of the grand jury’s decision, which is expected to come in a matter of days if not sooner, with sporadic protests breaking out and isolated arrests.

Brown’s family members aren’t the only ones calling for calm as the St. Louis County grand jury deliberates. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a preemptive state of emergency Tuesday, and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder made a plea for any protests to be peaceful in a video Friday.

“History has also shown that the most successful and enduring movements for change are those that adhere to nonaggression and non-violence,” Holder said. “I ask all those who seek to lend their voices to important causes and discussions and seek to elevate these vital conversations… to do so in a way that respects the gravity of their subject matter.”

TIME celebrities

Cosby Performances Canceled As Rape Allegations Grow

Comedian/actor Bill Cosby performs at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino on Sept. 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Comedian/actor Bill Cosby performs at the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino on Sept. 26, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller—Getty Images

He was scheduled to perform in Nevada, Arizona and Virginia

At least five upcoming Bill Cosby performances across the country were canceled Friday as the number of allegations that the comedian drugged and raped women continues to grow.

Cosby, who has denied claims of sexual harassment and rape dating back decades, was scheduled to perform at Treasure Island Resort and Casino in Las Vegas next week. In a statement, the resort said the decision to cancel the show came “by mutual agreement,” and ticket holders would be refunded. Performances in Arizona, Illinois and South Carolina, scheduled for 2015, were also canceled.

Cosby took the stage in the Bahamas Thursday, and a theater in Melbourne, Fla. said Cosby’s show would proceed Friday night.

“While we are aware of the allegations reported in the press, we are only in a position to judge him based on his career as an entertainer and humanitarian,” management at the King Center for the Performing Arts said in statement.

At least three women have come forward this week to claim the entertainer had abused them sexually. Cosby’s lawyer has dismissed the allegations as a “media-led feeding frenzy.”

TIME NFL

Adrian Peterson Promises Never to Beat His Kid With a Tree Branch Again

From right: Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson and his attorney Rusty Hardin speak to the media after pleading no contest to an assault charge on Nov. 4, 2014, in Conroe, Tx.
From right: Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson and his attorney Rusty Hardin speak to the media after pleading no contest to an assault charge on Nov. 4, 2014, in Conroe, Tx. Pat Sullivan—AP

'I won't ever use a switch again'

Adrian Peterson, the Minnesota Vikings running back suspended over child abuse charges, has apologized for using a switch to discipline his son, and promised never to do it again.

“I won’t ever use a switch again,” the player said in a USA Today interview published Thursday. “There’s different situations where a child needs to be disciplined as far as timeout, taking their toys away, making them take a nap. There’s so many different ways to discipline your kids.”

Peterson pled no contest to misdemeanor reckless assault earlier this month, and was subsequently suspended from the NFL for the remainder of the season. In the interview, Peterson said he planned to speak with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to discuss his suspension. The league said that Peterson would have to undergo rehabilitation and counseling before he can return to the league.

“Ultimately, I know I’ll have my opportunity to sit down with Roger face to face, and I’ll be able to say a lot of the same things that I’ve said to you,” Peterson said. “I regretted everything that took place. I love my child, more than anyone could ever imagine.”

[USA Today]

TIME Obesity

You Exercise Less When You Think Life Isn’t Fair

The 'why try' effect gets in the way of weight loss

People who have been the target of weight discrimination—and who believe the practice is widespread—are more likely to give up on exercise than to try to lose weight, according to a new study published in Health Psychology.

The online study of more than 800 Americans specifically looked at whether participants believed in “a just world,” or in this case, the belief that their positive actions will lead to good results. People who experienced weight bias in the past and didn’t believe in a just world were more likely to say they didn’t plan to exercise than those who did believe the world is just. In a separate part of the study, participants primed with anecdotes designed to suggest that the world is unjust were more likely to say they didn’t plan to exercise.

Experiencing discrimination leads some people to adopt a pessimistic view of the world, and they accept negative stereotypes about themselves, including the belief that they’re lazy, said study author Rebecca Pearl. “When someone feels bad about themselves and is applying negative stereotypes to themselves, they give up on their goals,” said Pearl, a researcher at Yale University, referring to a phenomenon known as the “why try” effect.

It’s an area of conflicting research. Some previous studies found that weight discrimination leads to weight loss, while others concluded that weight discrimination discourages exercise. Belief in a just world may be the factor that distinguishes between the two, Pearl said. People who think their exercise will pay off are more likely to try.

Because believing in a just world is key to losing weight, Pearl said that legislation and other public policy efforts could act as a “buffer against loss of sense of fairness.”

“It’s important for doctors to be aware of what people are experiencing, to know that these experiences might have real effects on people’s confidence,” Pearl said.

TIME Television

Peter Pan Live Updates Songs to Remove Slurs

A lyricist worked on new material with a Native American consultant

Fans of the original live musical Peter Pan know that its portrayal of Native Americans would not fly in today’s world, not even with all the happy thoughts in the world.

Which is why the producers of NBC’s upcoming special Peter Pan Live! have taken out all the offensive slurs, Entertainment Weekly reports.

A lyricist hired to expand and revise the production’s music reportedly consulted with a Native American consultant to change the lyrics. Most strikingly, the song “Ugg-a-Wugg,” a made-up word supposed to sound Native American, has been renamed “True Blood Brothers.” References to “brave noble red skin” have been removed, as have other nonsense phrases like “gugg-a-bluck.

“Now and forever, this will hopefully be the version [in the show],” executive producer Neil Meron told EW.

[EW]

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