Prince Harry chats with Coach Core graduates during a Coach Core Graduation event at St James's Palace on Jan. 14, 2015 in London, England.
Chris Jackson—Getty Images
By Megan Gibson
March 17, 2015

It’s official: Prince Harry is looking for a new job.

The 30-year-old royal is set to end his 10-year military career, Kensington Palace confirmed in a statement on Tuesday. That career has seen Harry qualify as an Apache pilot and complete two tours of Afghanistan. Yet come June, when he will leave the armed forces, the prince will be “actively considering other longer term employment opportunities.”

In the statement, Harry said that, “After a decade of service, moving on from the Army has been a really tough decision. I consider myself incredibly lucky to have had the chance to do some very challenging jobs and have met many fantastic people in the process.” He added, “I am considering the options for the future and I am really excited about the possibilities…. So while I am finishing one part of my life, I am getting straight into a new chapter.”

Harry, who already serves as the patron of several charities, already lined up volunteering stints that could very well lead to a full-time gig.

The prince will be be spending part of the summer volunteering with field-based conservation experts in Africa and spending time learning how local communities in sub-Saharan Africa are working to protect and conserve natural resources and wildlife.

Following his time in Africa, Harry will head back to London, where he is slated to volunteer with the U.K.’s Ministry of Defense’s Recovery Capability program, which supports wounded, injured and sick military staff. He’ll also continue to work with case officers at London District’s Personnel Recovery Unit, which he has been doing since last year, alongside both those who are administering and receiving physical and mental care. According to Kensington Palace, this work “will enable him to continue developing his knowledge of the entire recovery process, placing him in an informed position to further support wounded, injured, or sick servicemen and women into the future.”

Working with veterans makes sense for Harry, who last year founded the Invictus Games, a multi-sport event for wounded military men and women. In Harry’s statement on Tuesday, he revealed his plans to continue his work with the event, saying he was set on “making sure the next few Invictus Games are as amazing as the last.”

Finding a suitable working role can be challenging for a royal, especially one wanting to avoid a fully packed schedule of official royal appearances and overseas tours—and one who has a reputation as a party boy. Many royals, past and present, have spent their time working with charities. Harry’s late mother, Princess Diana, was particularly known for her charity work, serving as president or patron of more than 100 charities. Similarly, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, serves as the patron of various charities, including the East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices and the National Portrait Gallery. Then there’s Harry’s older brother William, the Duke of Cambridge, who has opted for service-based work. After seven years in the military himself, William is now gearing up to work as an air ambulance helicopter pilot, based in Cambridge and Norwich. (William, who is second in line to the throne, after his father Charles, has said he’ll donate his salary to charity.)

No matter what job Harry eventually chooses, he’ll have to balance it with his other lifelong work as a member of the royal family. The prince knows this. According to Kensington Palace, Harry will continue to support his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, attending official engagements in her honor, including embarking on a royal tour to New Zealand in May.

Read next: Prince Harry: Behind ‘My Tough Decision’ to Leave the Army

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