Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the taping of "The Kalb Report" at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. on April 17, 2014.
Alex Wong—Getty Images
By Maya Rhodan
February 12, 2015

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg doesn’t think there would be widespread backlash if the high court decides to legalize same-sex marriage across the country this year.

“I think it’s doubtful that it wouldn’t be accepted,” Ginsburg said in an interview with Bloomberg. “The change in people’s attitudes on that issue has been enormous.”

About 72% of Americans live in the 37 states and Washington, D.C., where gay and lesbian couples are free to marry, and soon the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments that will decide whether that freedom carries over to the rest of the U.S.

“I think that as more and more people came out and said ‘This is who I am,’ the rest of us recognized that they are one of us,” Ginsburg said. “We discovered it’s our next-door neighbor; we’re very fond of them. Or it’s our child’s best friend or even our child.”

[Bloomberg]

 

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