mobile-bannertablet-bannerdesktop-banner

Judge Judy Without Dialogue Is Just One Big Staring Contest

Feb 03, 2015

People watch Judge Judy for a number of reasons, but chief among them is her extraordinary bluntness. So it's especially interesting to watch an edited clip uploaded by YouTube user "Bill Smith" that shows part of an episode without dialogue. Instead, we just see the show's star, Judith Sheindlin, the plaintiff and the defendant listening and reacting to one another. The funniest part is when Judge Judy waves her hand at the 1:23 mark as if she is putting a "spell" on the two, as Digg joked.

The video is entertaining, but we suspect most people tune in to her program because they want to hear her zingers, so maybe in the end, the show is better off with dialogue.

LIFE Watches TV: Classic Photos of People and Their Television Sets

Radio Corporation of America (RCA) executives watch a brand new invention called television, their New York offices before introducing the product to the public, 1939.
Radio Corporation of America (RCA) executives watch a brand new invention called television, their New York offices before introducing the product to the public, 1939.Carl Mydans—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
Radio Corporation of America (RCA) executives watch a brand new invention called television, their New York offices before introducing the product to the public, 1939.
Writer Russell Finch enjoys a smoke, a bath and a TV show in 1948
Men gather to watch TV through a store window in Pennsylvania in 1948.
A boy watches TV in an appliance store window in 1948.
Sisters at St. Vincent's Hospital in Erie, Penn., watch a program on a new local TV station, 1949.
Watching a Western on TV in 1950.
A group of swimmers at an indoor pool watch the Russian ambassador to the United Nations, Jacob Malik, filibustering in the UN Security Council in 1950.
Grade school kids in Minneapolis watch a video "classroom lesson" on TV while the city's public schools are on strike in 1951.
A rapt audience in a Chicago bar watches the 1952 World Series between the Dodgers and Yankees. (The Yankees won.)
Six-year-old girls use a "Winky Dink" drawing kit on their home TV screen as they watch the kids' program, 1953. The show, which aired for four years in the 1950s, has been cited as "the first interactive TV show," especially in light of its "magic drawing screen" — a piece of plastic that stuck to the TV screen, and on which kids (and, no doubt, some adults) would trace the action on the screen.
A performing chimpanzee named Zippy watches TV in 1955.
An adopted Korean war orphan, Kang Koo Ri, watches television in his new home in Los Angeles in 1956.
Milwaukee fans watch the 1957 World Series, when their Braves beat the Yankees in seven, behind three complete-game victories by the gutsy Lew Burdette.
A railroad worker's family watches TV in a trailer at a camp for Southern Pacific employees in Utah in 1957.
An awe-struck baseball fan is seized with utter delight as he watches the Braves win their first and only World Series while based in Milwaukee in 1957.
A traveling businessman watches TV in a hotel room in 1958.
Tenant farmer Thomas B. Knox and his family watch Ed Sullivan and ventriloquist Rickie Layne on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1958.
Picketers watch TV in a tent outside the gates of a U.S. Steel plant in Gary, Indiana, during a strike in 1959.
Vice President Richard Nixon and his wife, Pat, watch the 1960 GOP convention in Chicago from their hotel suite.
The Kim Sisters — a Korean-born singing trio who had some success in the U.S. in the 1960s — watch television in Chicago in 1960.
LBJ watches TV during the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles.
A "Three-Eyed TV Monster" created by Ulises Sanabria which permits simultaneous two- and three-screen viewing, 1961.
Astronaut Scott Carpenter's wife, Rene, and son, Marc, watch his 1962 orbital flight on TV.
Die-hard New York Giants fans watch the 1962 NFL championship game against the Packers outside a Connecticut motel, beyond the range of the NYC-area TV blackout, December 1962. Green Bay won, 16-7.
A crowd watches John F. Kennedy address the nation during the Cuban Missile Crisis, October 1962.
Frank Sinatra watches his son, Frank Jr., 21, emcee a TV show, 1964.
Different CATV (Community Antenna Television) stations available to subscribers in Elmira, New York, in 1966.
Actress Diahann Carroll and journalist David Frost watch themselves on separate talk shows. Carroll and Frost were engaged for a while, but never married.
Radio Corporation of America (RCA) executives watch a brand new invention called television, their New York offices befo
... VIEW MORE

Carl Mydans—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images
1 of 28
All products and services featured are based solely on editorial selection. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website.