Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder addresses the media during a news conference in Detroit on Nov. 7, 2014.
Carlos Osorio—AP
By Josh Sanburn
January 15, 2015

Citing domestic violence concerns, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder vetoed two bills on Thursday that would have allowed people subject to personal protection orders the ability to obtain a concealed weapon permit.

The bill included some measures that the Republican governor supports, including doing away with county concealed weapon licensing boards and moving those responsibilities to police departments and county clerks.

But in a letter explaining his veto, Gov. Snyder said that the measures would do away with current law that automatically denies concealed carry permits to the subjects of personal protection orders. These civil orders are issued by courts to protect people threatened or harmed by another person, and are often used in domestic abuse cases.

“Victims of domestic abuse may not know to ask the court for a specific restriction on the subject’s ability to purchase and possess firearms,” Gov. Snyder wrote, adding that one of the Senate bills would remove blanket protection in cases where court-ordered protection does not specifically address firearms.

(Read next: The 1919 Theory That Explains Why Police Officers Need Their Guns)

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