Airport
People stand in the main terminal at Washington Dulles International Airport is shown October 2, 2014 in Dulles, Virginia. Mark Wilson—Getty Images

Why Airlines Don't Talk About Safety In Their Ads

Jan 20, 2015

Looking around at modern airlines' slogans, you might notice a common trend: Few of them stress safety. Not Delta's "Keep Climbing," not American Airlines' "The new American is arriving," not JetBlue's "You Above All."

There was a time when this wasn't the case. Safety was often mentioned in air travel ads when the aviation industry was still nascent in the 1920s and 1930s — back then, airlines had the tricky task of convincing travelers to try a then-unproven means of getting about.

The trend lasted until the late 1980s, when Pan Am launched reassuring ads amidst terrorist threats targeting American airliners flying across the Atlantic. Those threats, however, eventually took form as that year's fatal bombing of Pan Am Flight 1o3, which claimed 270 lives in the air and on the ground.

The Pan Am attack, says aviation security expert Glen Winn, is ultimately what convinced airlines to quit bragging about safety.

"Leading up the destruction of Pan Am 103, [Pan Am] had advertised themselves as not only the safest, but also the most secure," Winn said. "Airlines since then have been really careful how they say what they say."

Safety has since all but disappeared from airlines' advertisements. And when airlines are required to discuss safety during on-board safety demonstrations, major brands are trying to make them more fun, revamping their in-flight safety videos to transform mandatory prepare-for-the-worst briefings into informative musicals and short films.

Why the shift? Yes, Worldwide commercial aviation deaths per year have declined. But no airline can guarantee passengers total immunity from harm. And several high-profile disasters over the past few months, like Malaysia Airlines Flights 370 and 17 as well as AirAsia Flight 8501, have put travelers especially on edge. Putting the "S-Word" in slogans or commercials, airlines have found, doesn't reassure passengers — it just reminds them of the random chance of danger their next trip might bring, however slight it may be.

"When you talk about safety, you bring up a bad taste in people’s mouths," said Andy Trinchero, executive director of marketing at aviation marketing firm. "It’s something that people don’t even want to hear about, really."

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