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NASA: September Was Warmest on Global Record

This September was the warmest on record since 1880--the year scientists first began to track global data on temperatures.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's announcement clips on the heels of what was also the warmest August on record, which NASA said suggests an unfortunate trend in global heating.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration anticipates that an El Niño will start by the end of the year, due to warmer temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, and continue into spring 2015. An El Niño can have devastating impact across the globe, with repercussions that include abnormal temperatures and extreme weather. The last strong El Niño occurred in 1997-98.

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PHOTOS: This Astronaut's Images of Earth Look Like Beautiful Abstract Paintings

Harsh land. Windswept valleys in northern #Africa
"Harsh land. Windswept valleys in northern #Africa"—Alexander Gerst via Twitter on July 6, 2014Alexander Gerst—ESA
Harsh land. Windswept valleys in northern #Africa
Land use in South Africa, you can see where water is.
Irrigation in the #Sahara #Desert looks like a challenging task from up here... #BlueDot
An open history book of our planet: the #Sahara Desert
An open history book of our planet: the # Sahara Desert
Close-up of gigantic Salar of Uyuni in Bolivia. You can even see the salt fields and the 'Cactus Island'
The #Moon was still behind the horizon. A #FataMorgana of atmospherical refraction #BlueDot
When I took this photo, I was sure these are clouds. But now I'm not so sure... #BlueDot
Nasa: Astronaut Alexander Gerst pictures
An open history book of our planet: the #Sahara Desert
Human-made fires in East Africa. Can you spot them?
"Harsh land. Windswept valleys in northern #Africa"—Alexander Gerst via Twitter on July 6, 2014
Alexander Gerst—ESA
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