British Prime Minister David Cameron (L) Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg (C) Leader of the Labour Party Ed Miliband (R) walk through the Members' Lobby of Parliament on June 4, 2014 in London, England.
Dan Kitwood—Getty Images
By Dan Kedmey
September 9, 2014

Three British leaders who have a history of butting heads in Parliament set aside their differences Tuesday to make a joint plea to Scottish voters: Don’t vote for independence.

Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nicholas Clegg and Labour party leader Ed Miliband decided to pay an unscheduled visit to Scotland to underscore their cross-party support for a union.

“There is a lot that divides us,” said the ministers in a joint statement on Facebook. “But there’s one thing on which we agree passionately: the United Kingdom is better together.”

The surprise visit comes amid new polls indicating a tight race between Scottish supporters and opponents of independence.

“We want to be listening and talking to voters about the huge choice they face,” the ministers said.

Scotland will hold a vote for independence on Sept. 18.

Contact us at editors@time.com.

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