The Boeing 727 home of Bruce Campbell is seen in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014.
Steve Dipaola / Reuters
By Samantha Grossman
June 9, 2014

In a move that feels straight out of a Zach Braff movie, a former electrical engineer named Bruce Campbell decided to take a Boeing 727 and convert it into his home.

It all began when Campbell spent $23,000 for 10 acres of land in the Oregon woods, Reuters reports. He originally planned to make a home from freight vans, but then decided to up the stakes and use a jet instead. So he spent about $220,000 to purchase an aircraft and convert it into a home, where he now spends six months of the year.

Though the home is fully-functional, Campbell does not live lavishly. He sleeps on a futon, cooks with a microwave or toaster and bathes in a makeshift shower, Reuters explains. But still, he’s living ON A JET.

Here are some pictures of the interior:

Steve Dipaola / Reuters
A fully functional lavatory is seen in the Boeing 727 home of Bruce Campbell, in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. In 1999, the former electrical engineer had a vision: To save retired jetliners from becoming scrap metal by reusing them. Campbell, 64, is one of a small number of people worldwide who have transformed retired aircraft into a living space or other creative project, although a spokesman for the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association was unable to say precisely how many planes are re-used this way. Picture taken May 21. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY TRANSPORT REAL ESTATE) - RTR3SP8O
Steve Dipaola / Reuters
The cockpit, which Bruce Campbell is currently renovating, is seen in his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. In 1999, the former electrical engineer had a vision: To save retired jetliners from becoming scrap metal by reusing them. Campbell, 64, is one of a small number of people worldwide who have transformed retired aircraft into a living space or other creative project, although a spokesman for the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association was unable to say precisely how many planes are re-used this way. Picture taken May 21. REUTERS/Steve Dipaola (UNITED STATES - Tags: SOCIETY TRANSPORT REAL ESTATE) - RTR3SP90
Steve Dipaola / Reuters

 

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