By Talia Avakian
January 31, 2018

Millions of people who got up early or stayed up late Wednesday morning were treated to a rare natural spectacle – a Super Blue Blood Moon eclipse swept over the skies for the first time since 1982.

But if you opted to sleep in – or were cursed by cloudy skies – during the lunar eclipse, you’re still in luck.

Video taken from around the world (above) shows what the eclipse looked like for sky gazers.

The rare event brought a supermoon (a full or new moon that occurs within 90 percent of its closest approach to Earth), a blue moon (the second full moon of the month), and a total lunar eclipse together at the same time to make for a rare view.

As the moon emerged into the Earth’s shadow, it emitted a reddish tone that created a stark contrast against the backdrop of the sky.

The U.S. will see another lunar eclipse on Jan. 21, 2019. It will be visible throughout the country, though it won’t also be a blue moon.

Contact us at editors@time.com.

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