Monica Lewinsky attends the 'Cannes Lions Festival' on June 25, 2015 in Cannes, France.
Marc Piasecki—Getty Images
By Charlotte Alter
June 25, 2015

Monica Lewinsky is back in the spotlight, this time as an activist working to end cyberbullying and online shaming.

Almost two decades after she was thrust into international infamy for her affair with then President Bill Clinton, Lewinsky has emerged as a fierce advocate for victims of online shaming, arguing that her experience as a 22-year-old intern made her “patient zero” of online internet shaming, perhaps the earliest example of what internet shame can do to someone’s life.

In a series of articles and speeches, including a TED Talk earlier this year, Lewinsky says that we all need to work together to create what she calls a “compassionate society.” On Thursday, Lewinsky delivered the Ogilvy + Inspire speech at the Cannes Lions advertising festival on the relationship between the media and public shaming, and what advertising can do about it.

Here are extensive excerpts from her remarks, provided exclusively to TIME:

 

Write to Charlotte Alter at charlotte.alter@time.com.

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