June 28, 2014 9:00 AM EDT

Since the kickoff of the 2014 FIFA World Cup, TIME has partnered with the Photographic Museum of Humanity to curate #Teamphotogs, a team of 11 photographers from around the world using Instagram to document this year’s biggest sporting event.

TIME looks at a selection of work posted to Instagram over the past two weeks by #teamphotogs that captures the atmosphere from the streets to the stadiums in Brazil and beyond. As the competition enters the knockout stage, the collaboration continues.

Someone wrote the names of four people on the wall of a women's bathroom on Columbia's campus under the heading "sexual assault violators on campus." Each name was written in a different handwriting. The university confirmed reports by the Columbia Spectator and the Columbia Lion, that the graffiti had been found and since removed. The incident has further fueled tensions on campus over student safety. Last month 23 Columbia and Barnard students filed a Title IX complaint against the University claiming that Columbia mishandles sexual assault cases reported on its campus. Columbia is just one of 55 schools currently be investigated by the federal government for violations of Title IX, which say that college have a responsibility to protect their students from sexual violence on campus. In fact, complaints of campus rapes and assaults are so prevalent across the United States, that the White House has established a task force to address the issue with new guidelines for universities on how combat the problem. At Columbia, students complain that the university doesn't provide enough education about what constitutes consent to their students, hands down too-lenient sentences to alleged assailants and prioritizes its reputation over the safety of its students. Students have accused the school of burying cases so as not to be known as a campus plagued by sexual assault. [caption id="attachment_98071" align="alignnone" width="225"] The Columbia Lion[/caption] It's within this tense environment that someone seems to have taken matters into their own hands attempting to use public shame as a tool by revealing the names of alleged assailants that are normally kept private unless criminal charges are filed. The list could be meant to help women protect themselves against potential rapists. (According to one study, the majority of rapists are repeat offenders, averaging 5.8 rapes each.) But revealing the names could also pressure those listed—whether they are guilty or innocent—to leave campus. The strategy of shaming—whether intentional or not—has drawn press at another Ivy League campus. Lena Sclove, a student at Brown University, went to the school when an assailant allegedly sexual assaulted her and choked her. Even though the University found the assailant guilty of misconduct, they allowed him back on campus after just one semester. Sclove started a Facebook page and held an informal protest when her assailant returned. And though she did not publicly name Kopin, according to the Daily Beast, the Brown Daily Herald did when they covered a Sclove press conference. That coverage was picked up by the likes of Jezebel and Slate, who used the assailant's name. And though Kopin's attorney released a statement asserting that "these claims are false," it also said that Kopin does not plan on returning to Brown in the fall. Whether innocent or guilty—and it's important to note that the university did find him guilty—Kopin has been shamed off his campus. If universities do not improve the way in which they handle cases of sexual assault to the satisfaction of students and activists soon, more people may try to circumvent the authorities entirely.
Oliver Weiken—EPA

Felipe Dana @felipedana – An Associated Press photographer based in Rio de Janerio, Dana began taking photographs at 15 years old as a photo assistant in commercial studios. Since then, his work has appeared in Newsweek, The Atlantic, The Guardian, and the Wall Street Journal, among many others.

Rodrigo Abd @abdrodrigo – Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Abd has been a staff photographer with the Associated Press since 2003, covering political unrest in Bolivia, Venezuala’s 2007 presidential elections and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. He was part of a team of AP photographers to be awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News in 2013 for work covering the Syrian civil war.

Damir Sagolj @damirsagolj – Currently based in Bangkok, Thailand, Sagolj began taking photographs while serving in the Bosnian army during the Balkan wars. In 1997, he became Reuters’ chief Bosnia photographer and was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of coalition forces in Iraq following Sept.11. His work has been published in TIME, The Washington Post, Newsweek, The New York Times and Le Monde, among others.

Oliver Weiken @oliverweiken – Born in Germany, Weiken joined the European Pressphoto Agency in 2005 after working for two years with Deutsche Presse-Agentur. He has covered the G8 summit, Pope Francis and international sports events. He is currently based in Tel Aviv covering the Israel/Palestine conflicts.

Joao Pina @joaopinaphoto – A freelance photographer from Lisbon, Portugal and based in Buenos Aires, Pina’s work covering gang violence, the Arab Spring and the war in Afghanistan has appeared in The New Yorker, Human Rights Watch, The New York Times and Visao.

Logitech is onto something with the Case+, a modular iPhone case with a set of magnetic attachments. The magnetic backing on the Case+ allows for three separate attachments, all of which are included in the $199 package. There's a folding kickstand that doubles as an earbud wrap, a battery case with 2300 mAh of power and a minimalist wallet with two slots for cards and cash. The Case+ also includes a magnetic car mount, so you can place the phone on your dashboard with no clamps or connectors. On their own, the attachments work as expected. The kickstand and the wallet make a strong magnetic connection with the main case, and you can even stack these two attachments on top of one another. The battery case doesn't attach with magnets, but instead clasps around the main case, with a plastic arm on top and a U-shaped Lightning plug on the bottom. The car mount attaches to car windshields with a suction cup, and includes an extra plastic suctioning surface for sticking onto a dashboard. It's only when you try to use these attachments in conjunction with one another that the cracks in Logitech's system start to show. For instance, I liked the idea of carrying the kickstand and wallet together, at least in theory. When going to lunch, I carried them both as a single unit, paid for my food, stuck the wallet piece in my pocket and used the kickstand to prop up my phone while eating. It was fun the first time, but having to swap back and forth quickly became tiresome. And because the wallet doesn't have any outward-facing magnets, you can't keep it attached while using the car mount. While being able to slim down from a traditional wallet seemed appealing, juggling Logitech's wallet as a modular accessory was more trouble than it was worth. It's the weakest link in the package, not just from a practical standpoint, but from an aesthetic one; if you're don't care for the wallet's woven grey fabric design, you're simply out of luck. The battery case's lack of magnets is also an issue, as it prevents you from using the kickstand or wallet in tandem. And if you want to use the battery case with the car mount, you must attach another small magnetic plate, which sticks to the case with adhesive. It's an inelegant solution, and only underscores how Logitech should have made the battery case play nice with the other attachments from the start. All gripes aside, I love the underlying concept of Case+, and this is coming from someone who usually loathes smartphone cases. I've never accidentally caused major damage to a phone, so the extra protection has never been necessary for me. A case that allows me to use the phone in new ways would be much more valuable. In addition to improving the existing pieces, there's clearly room for Logitech to expand the Case+ line with more attachments. This could be the start of a new accessory platform, where you choose the handful of tools that you find the most useful. (Keyboard cases, camera lenses and beefier speakers come to mind.) But right now, Case+ seems more like a proof of concept than an actual product, and $200 is a lot to ask for a case system that doesn't work as well as it could. If Logitech were to flesh out the line and let users choose from a wider range of attachments, Case+ could be more than just a great idea. It'd be a killer product that even case haters like myself might consider.
Damir Sagolj—Reuters

Alejandro Kirchuk @akirchuk – Kirchuk produces long-term documentary projects in Latin America and is currently based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He won a 2012 World Press Award for his series ‘Never Let You Go,’ that explored Alzheimer’s disease. His photos have been published in the New York Times, The Guardian, The Wall Street Journal and ESPN Magazine.

Tommaso Protti @tomprotti – Born in Italy and based in Brazil, Protti is an award winning documentary photographer who’s work has been featured in Esquire, Le Monde, The New Yorker, National Geographic and The New York Times. He has recently exhibited photos at the Prix Bayeux-Calvados festival in France and Fotoleggendo in Italy.

Mario Tama @mario_tama – Tama joined Getty Images in 2003 and has won multiple awards for his coverage of Hurricane Katrina, Sept.11, the war in Afghanistan. His work has been exhibited at Visa Pour l’Image in France and he’s been featured in National Geographic and Newsweek.

Laura El-Tantawy @laura_eltantawy – A member of the VII Photo Mentor program, El-Tantawy is an Egyptian photographer who began her career in 2002 with the Milwaukee Journal and Sentinel and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. She is currently a freelance photographer based in Cairo, Egypt and London, U.K.

Alice Martins @martinsalicea – Based in the Middle East, Martins has been reporting on the Syrian civil war since 2012. A freelance photojournalist covering conflict and crises in Africa, the Gaza Strip, Brazil, her work has appeared in National Geographic, Al Jazeera, Vice, Newsweek, The Daily Beast, The Washington Post and The New Yorker.

Meeri Koutaniemi @meerimatildakouta – Covering human rights issues in over 20 countries, Koutaniemi is a freelance photojournalist and documentary film maker who is currently based in Helsinki. In 2012 she won Press Photographer of the Year in Finland and is now working on a long-term project on female mutilation.

Logitech is onto something with the Case+, a modular iPhone case with a set of magnetic attachments. The magnetic backing on the Case+ allows for three separate attachments, all of which are included in the $199 package. There's a folding kickstand that doubles as an earbud wrap, a battery case with 2300 mAh of power and a minimalist wallet with two slots for cards and cash. The Case+ also includes a magnetic car mount, so you can place the phone on your dashboard with no clamps or connectors. On their own, the attachments work as expected. The kickstand and the wallet make a strong magnetic connection with the main case, and you can even stack these two attachments on top of one another. The battery case doesn't attach with magnets, but instead clasps around the main case, with a plastic arm on top and a U-shaped Lightning plug on the bottom. The car mount attaches to car windshields with a suction cup, and includes an extra plastic suctioning surface for sticking onto a dashboard. It's only when you try to use these attachments in conjunction with one another that the cracks in Logitech's system start to show. [caption id="attachment_98198" align="alignright" width="300"] Jared Newman for TIME[/caption] For instance, I liked the idea of carrying the kickstand and wallet together, at least in theory. When going to lunch, I carried them both as a single unit, paid for my food, stuck the wallet piece in my pocket and used the kickstand to prop up my phone while eating. It was fun the first time, but having to swap back and forth quickly became tiresome. And because the wallet doesn't have any outward-facing magnets, you can't keep it attached while using the car mount. While being able to slim down from a traditional wallet seemed appealing, juggling Logitech's wallet as a modular accessory was more trouble than it was worth. It's the weakest link in the package, not just from a practical standpoint, but from an aesthetic one; if you're don't care for the wallet's woven grey fabric design, you're simply out of luck. [caption id="attachment_98199" align="alignright" width="300"] Jared Newman for TIME[/caption] The battery case's lack of magnets is also an issue, as it prevents you from using the kickstand or wallet in tandem. And if you want to use the battery case with the car mount, you must attach another small magnetic plate, which sticks to the case with adhesive. It's an inelegant solution, and only underscores how Logitech should have made the battery case play nice with the other attachments from the start. All gripes aside, I love the underlying concept of Case+, and this is coming from someone who usually loathes smartphone cases. I've never accidentally caused major damage to a phone, so the extra protection has never been necessary for me. A case that allows me to use the phone in new ways would be much more valuable. [caption id="attachment_98200" align="alignright" width="300"] Jared Newman for TIME[/caption] In addition to improving the existing pieces, there's clearly room for Logitech to expand the Case+ line with more attachments. This could be the start of a new accessory platform, where you choose the handful of tools that you find the most useful. (Keyboard cases, camera lenses and beefier speakers come to mind.) But right now, Case+ seems more like a proof of concept than an actual product, and $200 is a lot to ask for a case system that doesn't work as well as it could. If Logitech were to flesh out the line and let users choose from a wider range of attachments, Case+ could be more than just a great idea. It'd be a killer product that even case haters like myself might consider. [video id=wJgBpXzb ]
Mario Tama—Getty Images

The Photographic Museum of Humanity is an online museum dedicated to contemporary photography.

Krystal Grow is a contributor to TIME LightBox. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @kgreyscale.

Phil Bicker is a senior photo editor at TIME.


 

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