Ideas
May 1, 2015 7:00 AM EDT

Mental models are tools for the mind.

In his talk: Academic Economics: Strengths and Weaknesses, after Considering Interdisciplinary Needs, at the University of California at Santa Barbara, in 2003, Charlie Munger honed in on why we like to specialize.

The more models you have from outside your discipline and the more you iterate through them when faced with a challenge in a checklist sort of fashion, the better you’ll be able to solve problems.

Models are additive. Like LEGO. The more you have the more things you can build, the more connections you can make between them and the more likely you are to be able to determine the relevant variables that govern the situation.

And when you learn these models you need to ask yourself under what conditions will this tool fail? That way you’re not only looking for situations where the tool is useful but also situations where something interesting is happening that might warrant further attention.

The Mind’s Search Engine

In Diaminds: Decoding the Mental Habits of Successful Thinkers, Roger Martin looks at our mental search engine.

Now for the final step in the design of the mentally choiceful stance: the search engine, as in ‘How did I solve these problems?’ ‘Obviously,’ you will answer yourself, ‘I was using a simple search engine in my mind to go through checklist style, and I was using some rough algorithms that work pretty well in many complex systems.’ What does a search engine do? It searches. And how do you organize an efficient search? Well, algorithm designers tell us you have to have an efficient organization of the contents of whatever it is you are searching. And a tree structure allows you to search more efficiently than most alternative structures.

So what’s Munger’s search algorithm?

(from an interview with Munger via Diaminds: Decoding the Mental Habits of Successful Thinkers:)

(via Diaminds: Decoding the Mental Habits of Successful Thinkers)

This piece originally appeared on Farnam Street.

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