By Sam Frizell
February 11, 2015

The United Kingdom is paving the road for driverless cars by reviewing road regulations and launching autonomous driving trials across the country.

By the spring, the government will publish guidelines that will allow the testing of driverless cars to begin in the country, BBC reports. A full review of current legislation will be completed by the summer of 2017. The effort will involve rewriting highway regulations to take into account the effect of automated vehicles on traffic.

The U.K. is also providing £19 million—or about $29 million—to launch driverless car projects in four locations, including a vehicle called the Lutz Pathfinder pod, which will be tested on the pavements of Milton Keynes this year.

“Driverless vehicle technology has the potential to be a real game-change on the U.K.’s roads, altering the face of motoring in the most fundamental of ways and delivering major benefits for road safety, social inclusion, emissions and congestion,” said transport minister Claire Perry.

[BBC]

Contact us at editors@time.com.

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

Read More From TIME

EDIT POST