December 1, 2014 7:00 AM EST

Dec. 1 has been World AIDS Day since 1988 — but though the awareness and activism around the diseases has changed drastically during the years between then and now.

To see just how much our understanding and attitudes have evolved, take a look back at TIME’s coverage of AIDS through these seven essential stories:

Hunting for the Hidden Killers by Walter Isaacson, Jul. 4, 1983

This 1983 cover story wasn’t the first time AIDS appeared in the pages of TIME — in 1982, an article had explained the new “plague” to readers — but the tale of the “disease detectives” at the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health highlights just how little was known about the disease:

AIDS: A Growing Threat by Claudia Wallis, Aug. 12, 1985

As AIDS spread, so did awareness and knowledge — as well as paranoia:

Invincible AIDS by Christine Gorman, Aug. 3, 1992

As the ’90s began, the hope that modern science could quickly conquer AIDS began to fade:

As if by Magic by Steve Wulf, Feb. 12, 1996

For more than a decade, AIDS had been a death sentence — but suddenly survival had a celebrity face. The NBA’s Magic Johnson was back in action:

Hope With an Asterisk by Richard Lacayo, Dec. 30, 1996

In 1996, TIME named Dr. David Ho, an AIDS researcher, the Man of the Year — and, in a series of accompanying stories, explained why. That year, a cocktail of three drugs had changed what it meant to be an HIV patient:

Death Stalks a Continent by Johanna McGeary, Feb. 12, 2001

In the U.S., the possibility was on the horizon: AIDS could be perhaps become a manageable chronic illness, or at least a rare disease rather than a plague. But that hopeful attitude was not a worldwide phenomenon, as a lengthy and moving cover story about African patients made clear:

The End of AIDS by Alice Park, Dec. 1, 2014

The current issue of TIME presents pretty much the opposite picture from the one seen a mere three decades earlier. Whereas the syndrome’s first mentions were full of confusion and fear, today’s AIDS story — the tale of a program in San Francisco that aims to get everyone who’s positive onto medication — is about control and opportunity:

Read more: The Photo That Changed the Face of AIDS

Write to Lily Rothman at lily.rothman@time.com.

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