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Mars photographed by the ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft on Sept. 30, 2014.
Mars photographed by the ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) spacecraft on Sept. 30, 2014. ISRO—AFP/Getty Images

See the Stunning New Portrait of Mars from India's MOM Spacecraft

Oct 01, 2014

India's Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), which began orbiting the Red Planet on Sept. 23, has already sent back a stunning new portrait of Mars. The image taken Sept. 28 shows the beginnings of a dust storm on the surface of the planet and was taken by the Mars Color Camera aboard the spacecraft. The Mars Orbiter will be collecting images and other data from the planet's surface and atmosphere using five sensors, four of which have already been switched on.

This data will be shared with NASA, according to an agreement signed on Sept. 30 between the two agencies to collaborate on Mars exploration. NASA's MAVEN spacecraft entered Mars's orbit just two days ahead of MOM, and will be able to receive data from Opportunity and Curiosity rovers on the planet's surface.

PHOTOS: The Most Beautiful Panoramas and Mosaics From Opportunity’s Decade on Mars

Rover tracks disappear toward the horizon like the wake of a ship across the desolate sea of sand between the craters Endurance and Victoria on the Meridiani Plains.
Rover tracks disappear toward the horizon like the wake of a ship across the desolate sea of sand between the craters Endurance and Victoria on the Meridiani Plains.NASA— JPL-Caltech / Cornell University
Rover tracks disappear toward the horizon like the wake of a ship across the desolate sea of sand between the craters Endurance and Victoria on the Meridiani Plains.
A false-color image of Endurance Crater.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this false-color image after using the rock abrasion tool to brush the surfaces of rock targets informally named "Stars" (left) and "Crawfords" (right).
The piece of metal with the American flag on it is made of aluminum recovered from the site of the World Trade Center towers in New York City. It serves as a cable guard for Spirit’s rock abrasion tool as well as a memorial to the victims of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Opportunity has an identical piece.Image Number: PIA05221Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell University
Rover tracks disappear toward the horizon like the wake of a ship across the desolate sea of sand between the craters En
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NASA— JPL-Caltech / Cornell University
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