TIME Infectious Disease

5 Reasons We May Never Know Ebola’s True Impact

Ebola Liberia
A Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) worker is sprayed and disinfected as he leaves a high risk zone of MSF's Ebola isolation and treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, Sept. 29, 2014. Jerome Delay—AP

In this unprecedented Ebola outbreak, measuring and predicting the virus' true impact is nearly impossible

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a report in mid-September estimating that if current trends in the Ebola outbreak continue without a ramped up effort, then Ebola cases in West Africa would double every 20 days. In that situation, Ebola cases could reach up 1.4 million by January.

It’s a worst-case scenario estimate, but that’s only one caveat behind the 1.4 million figure, which remains muddled by research limitations and assumptions. While health experts and a CDC official told TIME that it’s common in public health surveillance projects to report overestimates, the fact that this is the worst Ebola outbreak in history adds additional levels of uncertainty in forecasting an unprecedented epidemic.

Here are five reasons why we may never know Ebola’s true impact, despite health experts’ best efforts to fully understand the virus’ deadly potential:

1. Most Ebola cases aren’t reported

CDC researchers believe that for every 1 reported case of Ebola, there are 1.5 additional cases that go unreported. They estimated that without additional intervention, 550,000 Ebola cases will be reported by January, a lower bound that doesn’t account for the cases that go unreported. By correcting for underreporting, they arrived at the upper bound of 1.4 million.

“Underreporting is always an issue with communicable diseases,” says Thomas Gift, an economist at the CDC. “We believe the actual incidence of disease is higher than what shows up in case reports.”

In West Africa, a lack of on-the-ground healthcare resources has meant that many Ebola patients haven’t been treated by doctors, or, in some instances, they have been turned away by doctors, which has resulted in an incomplete headcount of afflicted people.

2. Adjusting the projected numbers accurately is extremely difficult.

“It’s always difficult with these models to try to capture what’s really going on on the ground,” says Dr. Eden Wells, an epidemiology professor at the University of Michigan. “Given the data they used, it’s the best projection they could get at the time.”

The projections were based on data from only one day in only one country—Liberia—Gift said. Researchers used a model to predict the number of beds in use in Liberia on Aug. 28, 2014—the occupied beds were a measure of reported cases. They then surveyed experts at Ebola treatment clinics in Liberia to estimate the actual number of beds in use, weighing that estimate by the proportion of those who stay at home (and are therefore “unreported” cases) who eventually arrive in hospitals: a measure of both reported and unreported cases.

Gift added that while on-the-ground conditions made it difficult to collect more frequent data, there was also an urgency in releasing information about the outbreak. “Why didn’t [researchers] do more to get a range of confidence? Partially because this was designed to provide a tool to be used by people to assess the potential impact of intervention while the outbreak is going on,” Gift says.

3. The projection, based on a slice of data from Liberia, was applied to all of West Africa.

Liberia has been the most hard-hit country in the Ebola outbreak, with more than 1,800 deaths and 3,400 confirmed cases, according to the CDC. Sierra Leone and Guinea have suffered significant death tolls as well, though far fewer than Liberia. “Notable regional differences in underreporting might mean that using one [assumption] across an entire country is inappropriate,” the report said. This could, in theory, result in an overestimate.

“The 2.5 correction factor”—meaning that for every one reported case, there are potentially 1.5 unreported cases, according to the CDC’s modeling—”seems to have been correct for that day,” Gift says. “But [that] might change over time.”

Still, the fact that an Ebola outbreak has never been this widespread—and thus never modeled so extensively—allows the study some liberty in deciding its parameters, the report said.

“The purpose is to show that this epidemic was not going to show signs of peaking on its own. In historic outbreaks, there were a few hundred cases, and the epidemic diminished. That didn’t happen this time,” Gift says.

4. Much of the data coming from West Africa is likely inaccurate or incomplete.

A recent World Health Organization report said that in Liberia, “data were being reported from 4 different and uncoordinated streams, resulting in several overlaps and duplicated numbers.” The report added that many deaths were not being properly documented.

Last week, the New York Times similarly reported a discrepancy between the number of reported deaths in Sierra Leone and the number of buried victims, a fact that further complicates researchers’ efforts to measure Ebola’s true impact.

5. Projecting all the way to January is difficult.

“It’s a bit like weather prediction,” says Marisa Eisenberg, an epidemiology professor at the University of Michigan. “There’s a lot more uncertainty if you’re going all the way out to January versus the end of October.”

The obvious difficulty is that the report is based on the assumption of no significant additional intervention, which, with each passing week, is changing. A shorter-term projection of Ebola cases was provided by the WHO in a report published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine. The projection’s limited time span indicates a more realistic prediction of Ebola cases, even though it also assumes “no change in the control measures for this epidemic.” If Ebola cases were to double every 20 days without additional measures, as the CDC reported, then the WHO’s estimate indicates that there will be about 150,000 cases by January, a markedly more conservative figure.

Still, experts believe there is value in examining the CDC’s “worst-case scenario” of 1.4 million cases. Overestimation offers a safety net in ensuring adequate assistance is provided. If anything, it also adds an urgency to prove wrong the study’s chilling caveat: that this is what could happen if no additional resources are used to battle the deadly disease.

“[The researchers] are trying to cover their bases, and make sure they don’t under-deploy resources,” Eisenberg says. “If you’re going to be wrong in one direction or the other, it’s better safe than sorry.”

TIME Hong Kong

Hong Kong Shows Beijing Exactly What Democracy Can Look Like

Protesters block a street near government headquarters in Hong Kong
Peaceful protesters block a street near the government headquarters in Hong Kong on Sept 30, 2014 Carlos Barria—Reuters

Peaceful Occupy protests are showing the Chinese government that Hong Kong is no insolent child that needs protecting from itself

The Chinese Communist Party insists Hong Kong is not ready for democracy. Beijing announced late last month that if Hong Kong residents want to select their next leader, in 2017, they must choose from a list of candidates essentially vetted by the party. Mainland Chinese officials and academics liken Hong Kong to an insolent child, and the central government to a wise mother. Don’t act out, they warn, or chaos will follow.

Hong Kong people are proving them wrong. On the night of Sept. 29 and the morning of Sept. 30, just 24 hours after demonstrators here were hit with round after round of pepper spray and tear gas, tens of thousands of Hong Kong people took to the streets in a historic act of protest. As local police withdrew, the swelling crowd hung banners and blocked roadways on both Hong Kong Island and the Kowloon side. It could have been a night of violence; peace held.

What happened in Hong Kong that night was nothing short of amazing — the embodiment of civil society. Streams of people occupied the very heart of the city, from the financial district to government offices in Admiralty, to a key intersection across the storied harbor in Kowloon. They moved slowly and carefully through the packed concrete corridors, mindful of the people around them, eager to lend a hand.

In just a week, Hong Kong’s student-led class boycott has morphed into a social movement. The goal is the resignation of the city’s top leader, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, and a free election in 2017. Though many Hong Kong people were, or are, wary of pushing too hard, too fast, support is spreading as it becomes clear that the people on the street are committed to protecting the city and each other.

Late on the night of Sept. 29, on a packed subway car heading east from Central District to the shopping mecca of Causeway Bay, sweat-soaked demonstrators make way for ordinary people on their way home. When an elderly woman with a walking cane entered, several stood to offer their seats. She smiled at them, but refused to sit in their place: “You students need the rest,” she said.

The crowd is mostly but not entirely young, and represents many parts city’s social fabric. High school students in crisp white uniforms deliberate homework on the ground. Local business owners donate food. When a group representing the city’s ethnic minorities arrived at government offices, the crowd roared. “We Are Hong Kong, We Stand United,” their sign read.

Volunteers ferry basic necessities to the front and set up support stations. “Do you need a mask?” they ask. “We have biscuits!” People arrive with plastic shopping bags full of granola bars. There are reserves of toilet paper and bandages. Just before 3 a.m. on the morning of Sept. 30, a polite young man offers water. I decline. “We have sparkling too!” he grins.

As the night wears on, atmosphere is tinged by rumors that the police are on their way, that a crackdown is imminent. They are not sure why the police changed tactics and wonder when the authorities will once again resort to batons or tear gas. Some are wary of speaking to the press or being photographed, certain that officials are watching and plotting retribution.

The big unknown, of course, is what local authorities, and their backers in Beijing, will do. In a city that each year marks the anniversary of the 1989 crackdown in Tiananmen Square, people are all too aware of the worst-case scenario: brutal suppression by the central government. Will Beijing show they are listening and give ground? Will they send the People’s Liberation Army to crush the rally?

The ruling party is no doubt weighing its options. On the Chinese mainland, where the Internet is censored and local media are tightly controlled, they could try to stop the news from spreading, to purge scenes of mass protest from the front pages. They could try to cast the crowds in Hong Kong as self-destructive teenagers, to argue that it’s time for bed.

But that won’t fly in Hong Kong, where the press is largely free, and the camera-wielding crowd is documenting their every move. However this ends, it is their posts, pictures and videos that will make history.

It is a history the city can be proud of. Where there might have been discord and violence, cooperation and camaraderie reigned. A lesson for Beijing.

TIME Australia

Australian Police Arrest 1 in Counterterrorism Raids

Australia Terrorism
A police officer, left, speaks with two people outside of a house where a man was taken into custody during a counterterrorism raid in Seabrook, suburban Melbourne on Sept. 30, 2014 Julian Smith—AP

Police say the raids came after an eight-month investigation that began with a tip from the FBI

(MELBOURNE) — One man was arrested in counterterrorism raids in the Australian city of Melbourne on Tuesday after police said he provided money to a U.S. citizen fighting alongside extremists in Syria.

Hassan El Sabsabi, 23, appeared briefly in a Melbourne court on six counts of intentionally making funds available to a terrorist organization. He did not enter a plea or apply for bail.

El Sabsabi’s arrest comes a week after Melbourne police fatally shot a terror suspect who had stabbed two officers. Federal Police Assistant Commissioner Neil Gaughan said Tuesday’s arrest was not connected to that incident.

Police say the raids came after an eight-month investigation that began with a tip from the FBI. El Sabsabi is accused of giving about $12,000 to a U.S. citizen to fund his travel to Syria, where he is currently fighting, Gaughan said. The two men are not related and know each other primarily through social media, he said.

Gaughan declined to release details about the American in Syria, except to say he’d been fighting there for “a number of months.”

El Sabsabi was not involved in planning an attack, and there was no specific threat to the public, Gaughan said. Police believe he was operating alone, and was about to provide additional funds.

State and federal police officers raided seven properties in Melbourne on Tuesday and collected a large amount of electronic data, Gaughan said.

“This is a terrorism financing case — we didn’t assess there being a significant community safety risk, or a significant risk to our officers,” Victoria Police Deputy Commissioner Graham Ashton said.

Prosecutor Andrew Doyle said the evidence against El Sabsabi includes 25,000 pages of material from social media accounts and 500 telephone calls and messages.

El Sabsabi’s lawyer Trieu Huynh told the court that his client had never been in custody before. He asked that a doctor examine El Sabsabi as soon as possible for a medical condition, which Huynh declined to detail in court.

El Sabsabi said nothing and was ordered to reappear in February. If convicted, he could face up to life in prison.

Earlier this month, Australia raised its terror warning to the second-highest level, citing the domestic threat posed by supporters of the Islamic State militant group.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott told Parliament security agencies know of 100 people within Australia who are supporting terrorist groups overseas through recruitment or funding. He said 630 million Australian dollars ($550 million) in new spending on intelligence, law enforcement and border protection agencies over the next four years would include AU$20 million for the anti-money laundering agency AUSTRAC to help prevent terrorism funding.

“Anyone who supports terrorists is complicit in the dreadful deeds they do,” Abbott said.

Last week, terror suspect Numan Haider, 18, was killed after he stabbed two police officers during a routine meeting outside a Melbourne police station. Both officers are recovering.

TIME Hong Kong

Hong Kong Protest Leaders Give Government an Oct. 1 Deadline for Reform

Hong Kong protests
A man holds a sign that reads 'Supplies.' The pro-democracy protesters occupy several city blocks surrounding Government Headquarters, effectively blocking key roads linking Central to the rest of Hong Kong Island, Sept. 28, 2014. Todd Darling—Polaris

Democracy activists want electoral demands met, and the head of Hong Kong's government to step down, by Wednesday

Update: Sept. 30, 4:27 a.m E.T.

Occupy Central leaders on Tuesday announced an Oct. 1 deadline for the Hong Kong government to respond to their demands for voting reform, as mass pro-democracy protests entered their third day.

Oct. 1 is China’s National Day, and stipulating it as an ultimatum will be seen as a grave affront by Hong Kong’s sovereign rulers in Beijing.

A statement from Occupy Central called on Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to grant Hong Kong people the right to nominate and directly vote for candidates for the city’s highest office. The group also called for his resignation by Wednesday, the Associated Press reports.

However, Leung said Tuesday that there was no way Beijing would acquiesce. “The central government will not rescind its decision,” he said, adding that neither would he resign is position.

Chan Kin-man, a co-founder of Occupy Central, told TIME late on Monday that the large-scale occupation of Hong Kong’s streets may not go on for much longer, and mentioned Oct. 1 as the day the barricades could come down and the protests would switch gear. However, his stance is at odds with the determination of tens of thousands of mostly young protesters to stay on the streets.

TIME Iceland

Iceland Is Running a Gender-Equality Conference Without Any Women

Iceland's Foreign Minister Sveinsson addresses the 68th session of the U.N. General Assembly in New York
Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, minister for foreign affairs of Iceland, addresses the 68th session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York Sept. 30, 2013. Adrees Latif—Reuters

The "Barbershop" conference aims to encourage men to talk about gender equality among themselves

Iceland is organizing a gender-equality conference that won’t have any female attendees.

In a speech to the U.N. General Assembly on Monday, Icelandic Minister for Foreign Affairs and External Trade Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson said the “Barbershop” conference aims to bring together a group of men discussing gender equality among themselves, focusing particularly on violence against women.

“For our part, we want to bring men and boys to the table on gender equality in a positive way,” he said, describing the first-of-its-kind conference as an “exceptional contribution to the Beijing+20 and #HeforShe campaigns.”

The event will take place in January and will be co-hosted by the South American nation of Suriname, according to Sveinsson.

TIME Argentina

Judge Holds Argentina in Contempt of Court

The South American country's showdown with the U.S. court continues

A U.S. judge found Argentina to be in civil contempt of court as it continues to defy his rulings that the country repay some $1.6 billion to holdout creditors–largely American hedge funds–before it pays other bondholders, Bloomberg reports.

Most recently, the country has moved to shift control of its structured debt payments to Buenos Aires from New York, despite the judge’s rulings.

U.S. District Judge Thomas Griesa in Manhattan said that move is “illegal and cannot be carried out.”

Griesa did not rule on a penalty, but the holdout creditors have asked him to fine Argentina $50,000 a day until it complies.

Argentina’s Foreign Ministry said on Monday that the contempt ruling undermines “the dignity of foreign states,” according to Bloomberg. “The decision by Judge Griesa has no practical effects beyond providing new elements in the defamation campaign being waged against Argentina by vulture funds.”

[Bloomberg]

TIME Hong Kong

Watch the Massive Hong Kong Protests From the Sky

The drone video posted to Facebook and YouTube beautifully conveys the size and determination of Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests

Thousands of demonstrators are occupying key districts across Hong Kong in a massive democracy protest that has drawn international attention. Following a night of clashes with police, the number of protesters appeared to grow substantially on Monday.

The video above, posted Monday on the Facebook account of Nero Chan, helps convey the scope of the ongoing protests.

TIME politics

Protests in Hong Kong: A Brief History

Hong Kong protest 1967
A pro-China protester arrested by police officers during a demonstration in Hong Kong on May 18, 1967. Gamma-Keystone / Getty Images

The city has seen plenty of demonstrations over the past half century

Correction appended: Sept. 29, 2014, 9:50 a.m. E.T.

For a region of only about 400 square miles, Hong Kong has seen more than its share of protest in the last century. The uprising that sprang into action this week — as “Occupy Central” protesters demand the ability to elect their next local government head, the Chief Executive, without the intervention of Beijing — is part of a long history of political conflict in the area.

1967: Communists in the British colony of Hong Kong rise in support of the Cultural Revolution sweeping China

When England took control of Hong Kong in 1842 after the first Opium War, British Foreign Secretary Lord Palmerston is said to have remarked that it was “a barren island with hardly a house upon it” — but by the middle of the 20th century Hong Kong was becoming a prosperous business center. The cultural difference between the Communist mainland and the neighboring region was thrown into stark contrast in 1967.

Though the initial protests of that summer seemed to have arisen organically among Hong Kong workers, China supported the movement from afar and issued an ultimatum demanding that arrested protesters be freed; the ultimatum, however, did not involve any question of British control of the area. As TIME explained, the situation between the two nations was one of “mutual dependence”:

Britain wants to hold onto Hong Kong to protect its vast investments and to retain a Far Eastern headquarters for British banking and trade interests. It also does not know how it could gracefully withdraw from Hong Kong under the present circumstances without totally losing face in the Orient. In recent years, Red China has been building up its influence in the Crown Colony, and Britain has been too afraid of offending its overpowering neighbor to do anything about it. As a result, about one-fifth of the colony’s Chinese, who make up 99% of the 4,000,000 population, are openly pro-Peking, and the rest play it safe. Red China commands the support of three of Hong Kong’s major daily newspapers, the most important labor unions, and a large number of schoolteachers, which is one reason a high proportion of young Chinese in Hong Kong are Maoists.

That July, when shots from across the Chinese border killed five Hong Kong police officers, the U.K. responded by sending in troops, the first armed confrontation between British and Chinese soldiers in Hong Kong since Communist rule had begun in China nearly two decades before. Though the stand-off between the two powers could have gotten even more intense, by early August things had calmed down.

And that bitter history did not keep China and Hong Kong from getting closer in the decade that followed. Rather, they grew to rely on one another, economically at least: TIME reported in 1979 that China sent an annual $2 billion in exports to Hong Kong, while the same amount went back to the mainland in remittances from residents and earnings of Chinese companies located there. Hong Kong businesses relied on Chinese labor, while the Chinese government used Hong Kong as an outlet for its economic dealings with the rest of the world.

1989: Tiananmen Square helps Hong Kong’s independent political identity take shape

Economic interdependence was a major factor in shaping the 1984 decision about what Hong Kong would look after the U.K. handed over control in 1997. According to the agreement, the preexisting “system of law” and capitalist economy would be preserved even as the region became part of China. The decade-long period of transition, however, was marked by more strife.

In 1989, as pro-democracy protests gripped the mainland, a full one-sixth of Hong Kong’s population (by TIME’s count) came out to march in support of that cause. Meanwhile, many in Hong Kong weren’t much happier with the U.K. than they were with China: even as it began to seem that Beijing’s grasp on Hong Kong might be tighter than expected, Westminster also made it harder for residents of the colony to settle in the U.K., a move that left many Hong Kong residents feeling stranded between two cultures. After the Tiananmen Square massacre that summer, the modern Hongkonger identity began to crystallize. According to TIME’s reporter in Hong Kong at the time, Hong Kong residents were both firmly pro-democracy and firmly Chinese:

The glittering glass-and-steel Bank of China, Southeast Asia’s tallest building and a prominent addition to Hong Kong’s spectacular skyline, was to embody the faith that both Hong Kong and China placed in a common future, a visible symbol of the ”one country, two systems” promised when the British crown colony reverts to China in 1997. Last week two enormous black-and-white banners drooped across the tower’s facade bearing a grim message in Chinese characters: BLOOD MUST BE PAID WITH BLOOD.

Overnight the savage massacre in Tiananmen Square shattered Hong Kong’s wary faith in that future. Thousands donned funeral garb to mourn the dead of Beijing. The stock market plunged 22% in one day in a paroxysm of lost confidence. Chinese flocked to mainland banks to withdraw their money, as much in anger as in fear. And the largely apolitical people of this freewheeling monument to commercialism discovered a newfound political activism.

The grief and fury felt in Hong Kong are the latest expression of a startling change in the colony’s view of itself. Throughout its almost 150-year history as a bold, pushy trading enclave, the business of Hong Kong has been business. The colony was a place where foreigners and Chinese alike came to make money and get away from the political turmoil on the mainland. But since the student movement blossomed in Beijing last April, Hong Kong has been galvanized. It has found an identity at last, and it is Chinese.

2003: Pro-democracy protests return

In the early ’90s, Hong Kong Governor Chris Patten — the last British governor of the region — proposed a plan to further democratize Hong Kong’s government, over Beijing’s objections. So when the transfer took place in 1997, the question of how much democracy would last, and for how long, lurked beneath the smoothness of the hand-over.

Less than a decade later, that concern proved well-founded: in 2003, Hong Kong residents took part in what was the biggest pro-democracy protest in the whole country since 1989, sparked by a new antisubversion national security law, which ended up not passing. As TIME noted, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive had been counted on to “keep Hong Kong in its place,” but it was becoming clear that such a task was easier said than done.

2014: “Occupy Central” begins

Read more about the ongoing protests in Hong Kong here, on TIME.com: Hong Kong’s Protesters are Fighting for Their Economic Future

Read TIME’s 1989 cover story about the Tiananmen Square massacre, free of charge, here in TIME’s archives: Despair and Death In a Beijing Square

Correction: The original version of this story misstated the year in which England took control of Hong Kong. It is 1842, not 1942.

TIME China

China Keeps Citizens in the Dark Over Hong Kong Protests

The government blocked Instagram Sunday

China is well known for its censoring social media and certain websites when there’s news it wants to block out — and now that Hong Kong is ablaze with protests, the shutters have come down again.

Some Chinese newspapers have made no mention of the protests, and the countries authorities blocked photo-sharing app Instagram on Sunday, according to CNN.

China even blacked out a live CNN newscast about the protests as host Anderson Cooper narrated. “In the past, they’ve censored us, and it’s gone to black. They might do it again. They might censor us again tonight,” he said, seconds before authorities cut the stream off. “And, we’ve just gone to black in China,” he finished.

 

 

TIME Israel

Netanyahu Tells World Leaders ‘Hamas is ISIS and ISIS is Hamas’

Prime Minister also refutes Palestinian leader's accusations of "genocide" in Gaza Strip

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pushed back Monday against Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas’ claims that Israel was waging a “genocide” against Palestinians, and called on world leaders to treat Palestinian militant group Hamas as indistinct from the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS).

Speaking at the United Nations General Assembly, Netanyahu refuted claims by Abbas and others that his military had committed war crimes during the 50-day war in the Gaza Strip this summer, citing the lengths to which the Israeli Defense Force went to warn civilians to evacuate targeted areas.

“Israel dropped fliers, made phone calls, sent text messages, broadcast warnings in Arabic, all to allow civilians to evacuate targeted areas,” Netanyahu said, arguing that Israel took all available precautions to protect civilian lives, while Hamas deliberately fired rockets from areas where children live and play. “Israel was using its missiles to protect its children, Hamas was using children to protect its missiles,” he added.

He said that the fact that Hamas’s deliberate placement of rockets in civilian communities were the “real war crimes.”

The Israeli Prime Minister also spoke about the growing “cancer” of militant Islam, comparing the situation in Israel with that in Iraq and Syria. “ISIS and Hamas are branches of the same poisonous tree,” he said. “When it comes to their ultimate goals, Hamas is ISIS and ISIS is Hamas. And what they share in common, all militant Islamists share in common.”

The conflict, which ended in August, left 2,100 Palestinians dead and 73 Israelis dead, according to the BBC. The UN said that most of the Palestinian dead were civilians. “This last war against Gaza was a series of absolute war crimes carried out before the eyes and ears of the entire world, moment by moment,” Abbas said last week.

Netanyahu said criticism in Europe of Israel’s treatment of Palestinian civilians often amounts to thinly-veiled anti-Semitism. “We hear mobs today in Europe call for the gassing of Jews, we hear some national leaders compare Israel to the Nazis,” he said. “This is not a function of Israel’s policy, this is a function of diseased minds. That disease has a name, it’s called anti-Semitism, and it’s spreading in polite society.”

The president also warned that Iran was undergoing a “manipulative charm offensive” in order to lift sanctions and continue with plans to build a nuclear weapon. “It’s one thing to confront militant Islamists on pickup trucks… its another thing to confront militant Islamists armed with weapons of mass destruction,” he said. “Would you let ISIS enrich uranium? Then you shouldn’t let the Islamic state of Iran do them either.”

A UN Council tasked with negotiating with Iran on its nuclear program has not made much progress in recent weeks, according to the LA Times. They hope to reach an agreement to limit Iran’s nuclear program to non-military uses in exchange for lifting oil sanctions.

Netanyahu urged the world’s leaders not to trust what he called the “world’s most dangerous regime.” “To say Iran doesn’t practice terrorism is like saying Derek Jeter never played shortstop for the New York Yankees,” he said.

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