TIME China

How Facebook Makes Money in a Country Where It’s Banned

It wants Chinese companies to advertise internationally

Not even Mark Zuckerberg speaking Mandarin Chinese could get China to loosen its seven-year ban on Facebook. But that doesn’t mean the social media giant isn’t monetizing the market.

Facebook is tapping local partners in China to help convince Chinese companies to advertise on Facebook, even if the site isn’t accessible within the country, the Wall Street Journal reports. The main draw for Chinese companies, according to Facebook, is the opportunity to reach the 1.39 billion active monthly Facebook users outside China.

Facebook has already seen success with Chinese companies that have advertised on its site. These include Youzu Interactive Co., a Shanghai-based online game designer, which said that the 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) it spent on Facebook ads resulted in a two-fold increase in registered daily players on its hit online game League of Angels.

Facebook is one of several Silicon Valley giants attempting to monetize the Chinese market despite being banned in the mainland. Twitter, for example, opened a Hong Kong office this month to tap China for its advertising revenue, the company said. Meanwhile, Google — also banned in mainland China — has continued its push into the country with the launch of a Chinese developers’ version of YouTube last month.

Facebook’s efforts in China arrive amidst another project to monetize countries where it has limited access. The social media company has been launching mobile ads tailored to low-bandwidth connections in emerging markets, including India and Kenya, while the company’s Internet.org attempts to bring connectivity — and carve out more business opportunities — to underserved regions in the world.

Read Next: 7 Famous People Who Surprised Us By Speaking Chinese

[WSJ]

TIME Aviation

Germanwings Co-Pilot Was Treated for Suicidal Tendencies

Investigators have found no indication of a motive in the crash that killed 150 people

(MARSEILLE, France)—German prosecutors say the co-pilot of the Germanwings passenger plane that crashed in the French Alps had received treatment for suicidal tendencies.

Duesseldorf prosecutors say that Andreas Lubitz received psychotherapy “with a note about suicidal tendencies” for several years before becoming a pilot.

Prosecutors’ spokesman Ralf Herrenbrueck said Monday that investigators have found no indication of a motive so far as to why Lubitz crashed the plane, nor any sign of a physical illness.

All 150 people on board died in the crash.

TIME

JetBlue Systems Back Online After Major Outage

Passengers exit a JetBlue Airways Corp. plane at Long Beach Airport (LGB) in Long Beach, California, U.S., on Monday, July 22, 2013.
Bloomberg&Bloomberg — Getty Images Passengers exit a JetBlue Airways Corp. plane at Long Beach Airport (LGB) in Long Beach, California, U.S., on Monday, July 22, 2013.

JetBlue said the outage was not due to a cyber attack

JetBlue Airways Corp’s systems are back online after a computer system outage caused check-in delays at several U.S. airports on Monday.

The outage was not due to a cyber attack, JetBlue spokesman Doug McGraw said in an email to Reuters.

“The issue was resolved at approximately 6:15 a.m. Eastern Time,” McGraw said “We are working to resume normal operations now.”

McGraw did not provide details on what exactly what caused the outage.

According to NBC News, the airline was forced to issue handwritten boarding passes to passengers at many airports.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com and includes information from Reuters

TIME Aviation

Remains of Germanwings Co-Pilot Reportedly Identified in Wreckage

The remains of Andreas Lubitz could yield important clues

Authorities believe they have identified the remains of the Germanwings co-pilot who apparently crashed the plane into the French Alps and killed all 150 people aboard last week, according to a new report.

The German newspaper Bild am Sonntag, citing unnamed French investigators, reported that remains of co-pilot Andreas Lubitz were identified on Saturday using DNA matching. The 27-year-old Lubitz’s remains could yield important clues about the reasons for the crash, including whether he was using drugs or on depression medications, forensic scientists told Der Spiegel.

Lubitz was alone the cockpit of the Airbus A320 when the plane struck a mountainside in the French Alps, authorities have said. A French prosecutor said Lubitz intentionally flew the plane into the ground, even as the captain, who was outside the cockpit, banged on the door demanding to be let back in and passengers screamed in terror.

In the days since the crash it has emerged that Lubitz had undisclosed mental health issues and also sought treatment for vision problems that may have affected his ability to fly a plane.

[Bild am Sonntag]

TIME Aviation

Investigators Focus on Germanwings Co-pilot’s Mental State

A question of what could have "destabilized" Andreas Lubitz in Germanwings plane crash

(MARSEILLE, France)—European investigators are focusing on the psychological state of a 27-year-old German co-pilot who prosecutors say deliberately flew a plane carrying 150 people into a mountain, a French police official said Monday.

Returning from a meeting with his counterparts in Germany, judicial police investigator Jean-Pierre Michel told The Associated Press that authorities want to find out “what could have destabilized Andreas Lubitz or driven him to such an act.”

Lubitz was the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525 last week that crashed into a French Alps mountain near Le Vernet en route from Barcelona, Spain, to Duesseldorf, Germany, killing everyone on board.

“To have carried out such an act, it’s clearly psychological,” Michel said.

Authorities are trying to understand what made Lubitz lock his captain out of the cockpit and ignore his pleas to open the door before manually ordering the plane to descend on what should have been a routine flight. To that end, they are speaking with people who knew and worked with Lubitz — such as co-workers, his employer, his doctors.

At the remote mountain crash site itself, French authorities were building a road to facilitate access to the site.

In the southeastern city of Marseille, Germanwings chief operating officer Oliver Wagner was meeting with victims’ relatives. A total of 325 family members have come to France, he told reporters.

French officials have refused to confirm or deny news reports suggesting that Lubitz had been on medication for the treatment of depression or other mental issues. They also refused to comment on a report in Germany’s Bild am Sontag on an alleged transcript of the cockpit voice recorder that had the captain shouting: “For God’s sake, open the door!”

Brice Robin, a state prosecutor in in the southeastern French city of Marseille, has said none of the bodies recovered so far have been identified, denying German media reports that Lubitz’s body had been found.

Tests on the body of the co-pilot may provide clues about any medical treatment he was receiving. German prosecutors said Friday that Lubitz was hiding an illness and sick notes from a doctor for the day of the crash from his employer.

Wagner recalled a meeting in Haltern, Germany, last week with the parents of 16 high school students who had died in the crash, saying it was “certainly the saddest day of my life.”

“They asked ‘Why our children?'” he said. “We don’t understand what has happened and why it has happened.”

TIME conflict

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Claims U.S. Drone Strike Kills 2 Advisers in Iraq

Iraqi security forces rest next to a damaged house in the southern entrance of the city of Tikrit on March 29, 2015.
Ahmad Al-Rubaye—AFP/Getty Images Iraqi security forces rest next to a damaged house in the southern entrance of the city of Tikrit on March 29, 2015.

The U.S. denies the claim

(BAGHDAD) — Iran’s Revolutionary Guard says a U.S. drone strike has killed two of its advisers in Iraq, though the U.S. says it has only struck militants in its campaign.

The claim comes as negotiators on Monday attempted to reach a deal on Iran’s contested nuclear program.

The Guard said on its sepahnews.ir website the strike happened March 23, just after the U.S.-led coalition began airstrikes to support Iraqi forces trying to retake the Islamic State-held city of Tikrit. It identified the dead as Ali Yazdani and Hadi Jafari, saying they were buried Sunday. It called them advisers.

Reached by The Associated Press, the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad said: “The international coalition is aimed at Daesh only,” using an alternate Arabic acronym for the Islamic State group.

TIME Aviation

Australia Mandates at Least 2 People Stay in Cockpits After Germanwings Crash

Regulation would apply to all commercial flights with a least two flight attendants or more than 50 passengers

(CANBERRA, Australia)—Australia on Monday responded to the Germanwings air disaster by mandating that at least two crew members be present at all times in cockpits of larger domestic and international airliners.

Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss said airlines including Qantas and Virgin Australia would implement the changed security protocols from Monday afternoon. It would apply to all commercial flights with a least two flight attendants or more than 50 passengers. A flight attendant would enter the flight deck if one of the two pilots left it for any reason.

Previously, most Australian airlines have allowed their pilots to be alone on the flight deck.

French prosecutors blame co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, 27, for the crash of Flight 9525 that claimed 150 lives in southern France last week. The cockpit voice recorder has revealed that the pilot had been shut out of the cockpit when the Airbus A320 crashed.

Truss said there were already mental illnesses that stopped sufferers from being pilots in Australia, and that pilots’ health was regularly assessed.

“There is a need to balance the fact that people with proper treatment can recover from mental illness and be able to undertake normal careers with the critical priority of ensuring that aircraft are always safe,” he told reporters.

“So this is a challenging issue for airlines and indeed for that matter for other employers, to be fair to their employees who have mental health issues but at the time ensuring that those mental health issues do not put at risk the lives of other Australians,” he added.

Pilot suicide is one of the theories behind the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, which flew far off course during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8 last year and is believed to have crashed off the Australian coast with 239 passengers and crew on board.

Truss said pilot suicide was suspected behind more than a dozen plane crashes over the past 40 years.

TIME

Hometown Stands By Germanwings Co-Pilot Despite Tragedy, Pastor Says

"The co-pilot, the family belong to our community"

(MONTABAUR, Germany) — The pastor of the Lutheran church in Andreas Lubitz’s hometown said Sunday that the community stands by him and his family, despite the fact that prosecutors blame the 27-year-old co-pilot for causing the plane crash that killed 150 people in southern France.

The town of Montabaur has been rattled by the revelation that Lubitz, who first learned to fly at a nearby glider club, may have intentionally caused Tuesday’s crash of Germanwings Flight 9525.

“For us, it makes it particularly difficult that the only victim from Montabaur is suspected to have caused this tragedy, this crash — although this has not been finally confirmed, but a lot is indicating that — and we have to face this,” pastor Michael Dietrich said.

He spoke to The Associated Press after holding a church service Sunday to commemorate the crash victims and support their families.

“The co-pilot, the family belong to our community, and we stand by this, and we embrace them and will not hide this, and want to support the family in particular,” Dietrich said.

He added that there is no direct contact with the family at the moment, but that he believes they are receiving good assistance.

French prosecutors haven’t questioned the family yet “out of decency and respect for their pain,” Marseille prosecutor Brice Robin said.

Authorities are trying to understand what made Lubitz lock his fellow pilot out of the cockpit and ignore his pleas to open the door before slamming the plane into a mountain on what should have been a routine flight from Barcelona to Duesseldorf.

French officials refused to confirm or deny a partial transcript that German newspaper Bild am Sontag said it had obtained of the cockpit recording. The paper reported Sunday that the pilot left for the toilet shortly before 10:30 a.m. and was heard trying unsuccessfully to get into the cockpit again a few minutes later, then shouting “for God’s sake open the door.”

After several more minutes in which the pilot could be heard trying to break open the door, the plane crashed into the mountainside, according to Bild am Sonntag, which didn’t say how it obtained the report.

Brice, the Marseille prosecutor said that none of the bodies recovered so far have been identified, denying German media reports that Lubitz’s body had been found.

Tests on the body of the co-pilot may provide clues on any medical treatment he was receiving. Germany prosecutors said Friday that Lubitz was hiding an illness and sick notes for the day of the crash from his employer.

Dietrich, the pastor, said he knew Lubitz as a teenager, when he attended religious education 13 years ago, and his mother, who worked as a part-time organist in the community.

“When I worked with her or talked to her, it was very good and very harmonious. We had good conversations,” Dietrich said. “I know her and her family. This does not make sense. It is incomprehensible for me, for us, for everyone who knew her and the family.”

“From what I’ve heard, there were no obvious signs that there is anything in the background that could lead to this,” he added.

In Rome, Pope Francis on Sunday prayed for the victims of the plane crash, citing in particular the 16 German students returning from an exchange trip to Spain.

Francis offered the prayer after Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter’s Square at the start of Holy Week.

In Le Vernet, a town near the crash site, families and friends of those killed were still coming to terms with what had happened.

“Members of the family shed tears as they went to see the site,” said Ippei Yamanaka, co-worker of Japanese passenger Junichi Sato who died in the crash. “It was particularly moving to see Mr. Sato’s father asking the leader of the Kempeitai (a Japanese military rescue team), with many tears in his eyes, for them to continue the search operation and for it to finish earlier even by just one day.”

“His wife says she still she cannot believe what has happened, saying that it almost feels like her husband is away on his business trip and that it still feels like he is going to return soon,” Yamanaka said.

___

Frank Jordans in Berlin, Philippe Sotto in Paris and Frances D’Emilio in Rome, contributed to this report.

TIME diplomacy

Iran Nuclear Talks at Crunch Time

A March 31 target date is fast approaching

(LAUSANNE, Switzerland)—Negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program entered a critical phase on Monday with differences still remaining less than two days before a deadline for the outline of an agreement.

With the March 31 target fast approaching, the top diplomats from the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council, Germany and Iran were meeting to try to bridge remaining gaps and hammer out the framework deal that would be the basis for a final accord to be reached by the end of June.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Javad Zarif, have been meeting in the Swiss town of Lausanne since Thursday in an intense effort to reach a political understanding on terms that would curb Iran’s nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief.

Officials say the sides have made some progress, with Iran considering demands for further cuts to its uranium enrichment program but pushing back on how long it must limit technology it could use to make atomic arms. In addition to sticking points on research and development, differences remain on the timing and scope of sanctions removal, the officials said.

And, in a sign that a deal is unlikely on Monday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov will leave the talks, just a day after arriving, to return to Moscow for previously planned meetings, according to his spokeswoman Maria Zarakhova. Lavrov will return to Lausanne on Tuesday if there is a realistic chance for a deal, she said.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest said on Sunday it was up to the Iranians to make the choice to accept what has been presented to them.

By accepting the restrictions, the Iranians would “live up to their rhetoric that they are not trying to acquire a nuclear weapon,” he said in Washington on ABC’s “This Week.”

The officials in Lausanne said the sides were advancing on limits to aspects of Iran’s program to enrich uranium, which can be used to make the core of a nuclear warhead.

Tehran has said it is willing to address concerns about its stockpiles of enriched uranium, although it has denied that will involve shipping it out of the country, as some western officials have said. One official said on Monday that Iran might deal with the issue by diluting its stocks to a level that would not be weapons grade.

A senior State Department official said that shipping the stockpile is one of the “viable options that have been under discussion for months … but resolution is still being discussed.”

Uranium enrichment has been the chief concern in over more than a decade of international attempts to cap Iran’s nuclear programs. But a Western official said the main obstacles to a deal were no longer enrichment-related but instead the type and length of restrictions on Tehran’s research and development of advanced centrifuges and the pace of sanctions-lifting.

Both demanded anonymity — the State Department official in line with U.S. briefing rules and the Western official because he was not authorized to discuss the emerging deal.

Over the past weeks, Iran has moved from demanding that it be allowed to keep nearly 10,000 centrifuges enriching uranium, to agreeing to 6,000. The officials said Tehran now may be ready to accept even fewer.

Tehran says it wants to enrich only for energy, science, industry and medicine. But many countries fear Iran could use the technology to make weapons-grade uranium.

TIME India

10 Killed, Dozens Missing as Torrential Rains Trigger Landslides, Flooding in Kashmir

An ailing woman is carried on a wooden plank to a safer place from her partially submerged house after incessant rains in Srinagar
Danish Ismail—REUTERS An ailing woman is carried on a wooden plank to a safer place from her partially submerged house after incessant rains in Srinagar March 30, 2015.

Unseasonal rains have lashed northern India over the past few weeks, destroying crops and raising concerns over safety

A landslide in Kashmir killed at least 10 people on Monday as unseasonal rains swept northern India, compelling hundreds to flee their homes over fears of flooding.

The landslide took place in a village about 25 miles from Indian-administered Kashmir’s capital city Srinagar, where a section of a hill buried a house where three families were sleeping, Reuters reported.

“The entire house is covered in earth,” said Mushtaq Ahmad, a neighbor. “The chance of finding everyone alive is unlikely.”

Around 60 more villagers are trapped in three houses, officials told The Indian Express, and the Indian army has been called in to assist with the rescue efforts.

Meteorologists warned that the torrential rain that has damaged harvests in the region over the past month would persist, although the intensity is expected to reduce. Rural suicides in the region have also reportedly risen during the same period, as winter crops have been destroyed by the rains.

The devastation comes as Kashmiri families are still recovering from the region’s worst-ever flood last September, which claimed over 400 lives and rendered millions homeless.

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