TIME england

The Queen of England Is Facing a Staff Revolt at Windsor Castle

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Staff may withdraw services because of low pay

For the first time in history, the Queen of England’s household staff may take industrial action.

The Guardian reports that they are frustrated by paltry wages, and will cast ballots Tuesday to determine if they will continue with certain services they currently perform without pay around her weekend home at Windsor Castle — such as taking visitors on tours, interpreting and offering first aid.

The U.K.’s Public and Commercial Services union says more than 100 disgruntled staff members may rescind these free services, citing chronic underpayment.

The starting salary for household staff at Windsor Castle is reportedly as little as $20,000.

“It is a failure of leadership on the part of the Queen that despite receiving close to £300 million [$443,658,000] a year in public subsidy she continues to pay staff so badly,” antimonarchist campaigner Graham Smith told the Guardian.

However, the Royal Collection Trust, which administers the Queen’s homes, says the uncompensated tasks are not compulsory and only performed voluntarily. It further argues that employees are paid above the market rate and receive a generous pension.

[Guardian]

TIME Crime

British Man Duped Prison Officials Into Freeing Him With Fake Government Email

He instructed officials to release him—and they did

A British man is awaiting sentencing after he apparently created a fake government email address while in prison and used it to trick officials into releasing him.

A prosecutor said Neil Moore, 28, was awaiting trial on fraud charges last year when he used a cell phone that he snuck in to the Wandsworth prison to create a web domain (hmcts-gsi-gov.org.uk) that looked like that of Britain’s Royal Courts of Justice (hmcts.gsi.gov.uk), NBC News reports. He then created an email address with that domain and pretended to be a court clerk, messaging prison officials to say he had been granted bail and should be freed.

Not only did officials comply and let him out on March 10 last year, documents show, but he also turned himself back in a few days later, his lawyer says. According to the Ilford Recorder, authorities were already aware of his escape.

Moore will be sentenced on April 20 after pleading guilty to one count of escape from lawful custody and eight counts of fraud. He was already facing fraud charges when he made his escape after impersonating employees at major banks in order to convince financial companies to fraudulently transfer him roughly $2.66 million U.S.

[NBC News]

TIME Crime

Amanda Knox’s Ex Says ‘Part of Me Is Destroyed’ After Legal Battle

Raffaele Sollecito
Andrew Medichin—AP Raffaele Sollecito talks to the media during a press conference in Rome, March 30, 2015.

Raffaele Sollecito says he does "not yet feel a complete sense of freedom" after his conviction was reversed

Raffaele Sollecito, the ex-boyfriend of Amanda Knox whose name was recently cleared by an Italian court in the 2007 death of Knox’s roommate, says he will “never be the same.”

“At times, I realize that I do not yet feel a complete sense of freedom,” the 31-year-old told PEOPLE. “I was trapped in this for so long that now I won’t be able to switch back to how my life was before. Part of me will never be the same. Part of me is destroyed.”

In a surprise ruling on Friday, the Italian Supreme Court reversed the sentencing of Sollecito and Knox, who were previously found guilty in the death of Meredith Kercher, a British student. The decision ended a nearly eight-year legal battle that included four years in prison, a successful appeal that was later overturned by the Supreme Court, a retrial and a second guilty verdict by another appellate court.

Another man whom forensic evidence linked to the crime scene, Rudy Guede, was convicted separately and is still in jail.

Read more at PEOPLE.

TIME India

See the Aftermath of the Deadly Landslide in Kashmir

At least 6 people were killed in a landslide after unseasonal rains lashed India, authorities said Monday. It occurred in a village some 25 miles from Kashmir's capital city of Srinagar.

Read next: At Least 6 Die in Kashmir Landslide

TIME Daily Show

South Africans Rejoice and Regret Trevor Noah’s Ascension to The Daily Show

For South African comedians, there is no shortage of rich material. A President charged with using state funds to upgrade his personal home with a top-of-the-line chicken coop to an electricity company better at delivering excuses than power — the company recently blamed wet coal for power outages. So it is with some degree of regret, and with a great deal of pride, that South Africans welcomed the news that Soweto-born Trevor Noah is to take over The Daily Show when host Jon Stewart steps down later this year.

Twitter lit up with notes of congratulations and support, as South Africans bequeathed yet another star to the international pantheon of household names. “Could Trevor Noah be SA’s third A-lister after Madiba and Charlize?” wrote Capetonian Sibongile Mafu, using an affectionate term for Nelson Mandela and referring to Academy Award–winning actress Charlize Theron. “I think so!”

Other South African comedians celebrated with humorous riffs of their own, pondering the wealth that comes with taking the job of one of the best-paid television hosts in American history: “South African Google hangs as thousands search “John Stewart’s Salary” #dailyshow #TrevorNoah” tweeted radio host Darren Simpson, before going on to note that his ascension to Jon Stewart-dom “makes you realize your dreams.”

Simpson, who has known Noah since 2006 from their time together on South Africa’s comedy circuit, tells TIME that there is “no doubt that Trevor can deliver. He is a phenomenal talent. He is going to offer something completely different, and completely great.” His humor, notes Simpson, will make for a seamless transition. “The fact that he is from South Africa is superfluous to what an incredible talent he is.”

Not that South Africans will let it be forgotten that Noah is one of their own. “Congratulations, @Trevornoah, on the temporary reunification of South Africa,” tweeted author Richard de Nooy in a take on Noah’s bi-racial origins as much as his ability to transcend the legacy of apartheid and take on still-touchy race issues.

Noah, the son of a black Xhosa mother and a white Swiss-German father whose relationship was illegal during the time of apartheid, often likes to joke that he shouldn’t be allowed to exist. That mixed heritage sparked humorous debate on Twitter, as correspondents mockingly claimed Noah for one race or the other. “Breaking: amaXhosa and Swiss-Germans in fierce race to claim Trevor Noah,” tweeted Cape Town–based journalist Lester Kiewit.

Much has been made of the fact that The Daily Show has chosen for Stewart’s successor a relative unknown on the American comedy circuit. Noah has only made three appearances on the show since he came on as a correspondent in December, and the fact that he has supplanted other favorites may rankle avid Daily Show fans stateside. But for Americans who are only now starting to wake up to the serious race issues that divide the U.S., Trevor Noah could not be a better gift from South Africa. His brand of satirical sugar may yet make the medicine go down. For South Africans, however, the parting is bittersweet. “Trevor is going global, and that’s great,” says Simpson. “But we are going to have to get used to seeing a lot less of Trevor Noah, and that’s a loss.” But when it comes to commenting on the President’s chicken coop, there is sure to be plenty of folks to take his place.

Read next: Trevor Noah Is the Sort of Risk More Networks Should Take

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TIME Japan

Springtime for Tokyo as Cherry Blossoms Show Their Colors

Japan's Meteorological Agency announced on March 29 that the city's cherry blossoms had reached full bloom, five days earlier than in an average year

TIME Spain

This Country Is About to Offer Citizenship to 2.2 Million Jews

ISRAEL-SPAIN-DIPLOMACY
Gali Tibbon—AFP/Getty Images Spanish Foreign Minister Jose Manuel Garcia-Margallo (L) lays a wreath at the Hall of Remembrance on Jan. 14, 2015, during his visit to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem that commemorates the six million Jews killed by the Nazis during World War II.

Spain wants to make amends for expelling Jews from the country in 1492

Exactly 523 years ago on Tuesday, the Edict of Expulsion, which forced Spain’s Jewish community to convert to Catholicism or leave the country, was issued by monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella. It may have taken more than half a millennia, but Madrid is finally about to make amends for kicking out the Jews by offering citizenship to the estimated 2.2 million descendants of those expelled.

The Sephardic Ancestry Bill is expected to be approved in May by Spain’s upper house of parliament, the Senate. The bill is not expected to become law until the end of the year, but already, the Spanish embassy in Tel Aviv has been inundated by requests from those who are eager to get Spanish citizenship and the access to European Union countries it entails.

The Spanish government estimates that up to 90,000 people may apply, but it does not really know how many people may be able to prove that they have a blood relative who was forced to flee in 1492.

Spain had a Jewish population of 300,000 at the time of expulsion. It is not clear how many left but the migrants settled across the globe. As well as modern-day Israelis, Jews living in South America, North Africa and Turkey are expected to apply. Descendants of Spanish Jews include the 19th Century British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli and a host of artists, writers and scientists.

As people across the European continent grow more concerned about immigration, the move has not been universally popular in Spain and with about one in four Spaniards registered as unemployed, there is a fear that a new influx of immigrants may put more pressure on the job market.

Many Israeli Jews have already have second passports, mostly from European Union countries or the U.S. — an estimated 500,000 Israelis have German passports — allowing them to enter and work abroad more easily.

Spain’s justice minister, Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón, said that that bill was about addressing a historic aberration and that the expulsion was one of Spain’s, “most important historical errors. Now they [Jewish people] have an open door to become once again what they should have never stopped being — citizens of Spain.”

The Spanish government recently set out the conditions for those applying, which it hopes may limit the numbers. First applicants must prove they are Sephardic Jews — whose ancestors originated in Spain — by way of a certificate from a rabbi, and, more taxingly, prove some link to Spain, including what the opposition Socialists have described as an “integration” test. The government says the requirement includes a knowledge of Spanish or, vaguely, some sort of other connection to Spain.

The move by the Spanish government is not likely to prove universally popular in Israel either, which was established to provide a state for Jews. Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, was criticised in aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris in January when he encouraged French and other European Jews to emigrate to Israel.

“Israel sees the bill as a piece of internal legislation in Spain; as Spain dealing with its dark past in terms of the tragedy of what happened when it kicked out the Jewish people, just because they were Jews,” says Hamutal Rogel Fuchs, a spokesman for the Israeli embassy in Madrid.

“But today, the Jewish people have a home — Israel. So we congratulate Spain for acting, but it is not a question of whether we are comfortable or uncomfortable. Israel sees the bill as a symbolic gesture that reinforces out relationship.”

Avi Mayer of the Jewish Agency in Jerusalem, which encourages Jews to move to Israel, says that he doubts many Sephardic Jews will swap Israel for Spain. “According to Israel’s Central Bureau of Statistics, emigration rates are at an all-time low and have been steadily declining for the past twenty years.

“At the same time, Aliyah [immigration to Israel] is at a 10-year high, and immigration from Western countries has overtaken immigration from the rest of the world for the first time in Israel’s history.”

Rather than flee, large numbers of Jews converted to Catholicism rather than migrate. Last year, Natan Sharansky, the chairman of the Jewish Agency said that Israel must find away to find the descendants of Jews who converted and offer them citizenship of Israel.

Given that Israeli Gross Domestic Product is ahead of that in Spain, it is not likely to that hundreds of thousands of Jews will suddenly appear at Barajas airport in Madrid once the legislation is passed. And, as number of Muslim groups and academics have pointed out, both the Jews and Muslims were victims of Isabella and Ferdinand’s Spanish Inquisition, and so why are only the descendants of the Jewish victims now being offered reparation?

TIME China

How Facebook Makes Money in a Country Where It’s Banned

It wants Chinese companies to advertise internationally

Not even Mark Zuckerberg speaking Mandarin Chinese could get China to loosen its seven-year ban on Facebook. But that doesn’t mean the social media giant isn’t monetizing the market.

Facebook is tapping local partners in China to help convince Chinese companies to advertise on Facebook, even if the site isn’t accessible within the country, the Wall Street Journal reports. The main draw for Chinese companies, according to Facebook, is the opportunity to reach the 1.39 billion active monthly Facebook users outside China.

Facebook has already seen success with Chinese companies that have advertised on its site. These include Youzu Interactive Co., a Shanghai-based online game designer, which said that the 10 million yuan ($1.6 million) it spent on Facebook ads resulted in a two-fold increase in registered daily players on its hit online game League of Angels.

Facebook is one of several Silicon Valley giants attempting to monetize the Chinese market despite being banned in the mainland. Twitter, for example, opened a Hong Kong office this month to tap China for its advertising revenue, the company said. Meanwhile, Google — also banned in mainland China — has continued its push into the country with the launch of a Chinese developers’ version of YouTube last month.

Facebook’s efforts in China arrive amidst another project to monetize countries where it has limited access. The social media company has been launching mobile ads tailored to low-bandwidth connections in emerging markets, including India and Kenya, while the company’s Internet.org attempts to bring connectivity — and carve out more business opportunities — to underserved regions in the world.

Read Next: 7 Famous People Who Surprised Us By Speaking Chinese

[WSJ]

TIME Aviation

Germanwings Co-Pilot Was Once Treated for Suicidal Tendencies

Investigators have found no indication of a motive in the crash that killed 150 people

(MARSEILLE, France) — How could someone once diagnosed with suicidal tendencies get a job as a commercial pilot, entrusted with the lives of hundreds of people? That’s the question being asked after officials confirmed Monday that Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz received lengthy psychotherapy before receiving his pilot’s license.

All 150 people on board were killed by what prosecutors believe was a deliberate decision by Lubitz to slam the Airbus A320 he was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf into a mountain in the French Alps last Tuesday.

Lufthansa, Germanwings’ parent company, declined to say whether it knew of Lubitz’s mental health problems. But it said the young pilot had passed all required medical checks since starting work for its subsidiary two years ago.

Prosecutors in Duesseldorf, where Lubitz had an apartment, said the psychotherapy occurred over an extended period before he received his pilot’s license, and that medical records referred to “suicidal tendencies.” They provided no dates.

Lubitz started pilot training in 2008, though it’s unclear when he finished the at least three-year-long course and received his license. Lufthansa said he was certified to fly their aircraft in 2013.

The country’s aviation authority wouldn’t comment on Lubitz’s health, despite acknowledging last week that his record with the agency noted he needed “specific regular medical examination” beyond the annual checkup required of all pilots.

“The German Federal Aviation Office isn’t directly responsible for assessing the air-medical fitness of pilots,” said Cornelia Cramer, a spokeswoman for the agency, which is in charge of granting pilots’ licenses.

Cramer said the medical checks are conducted by specially trained doctors, but declined to say whether their findings are passed on to the agency.

The head of the German Aviation Medical Practitioners Association, the organization representing doctors who determine if pilots are medically fit to fly, said the standard medical evaluation would not have been able to determine if a pilot suffered from a serious mental illness.

All pilots must undergo regular medical checks that include a cursory psychological evaluation, according to Dr. Hans-Werner Teichmueller, the agency’s head. But such tests rely on patients being honest with their doctors, and even a seriously mentally unstable person would have been able to put a “mask” on for the investigation, he said.

“You can’t see anything beyond the face,” Teichmueller said. “We have developed a very refined system in Europe and most of us are in agreement that this system is optimal. If we were to add more psychological tests or modify the way we test, then we can still not change a situation like this.”

Lubitz continued to visit doctors until recently, receiving notes that excused him from work — including for the day of the crash — but none referred to suicidal tendencies or aggression toward others, said prosecutors’ spokesman Ralf Herrenbrueck.

He didn’t say what medical help Lubitz was seeking at the time of the crash, but noted that there was no evidence of any physical illness.

While Lubitz was physically fit — he was an avid runner who took part in half-marathons — his future employers had at least some indication there was a problem.

Last week, Carsten Spohr, the CEO of Lufthansa, acknowledged there had been a “several-month” gap in Lubitz’s training six years ago, but refused to elaborate. Following the disruption, he said, Lubitz “not only passed all medical tests but also his flight training, all flying tests and checks.”

Prosecutors said they have so far found no indications in Lubitz’s family, his personal surroundings or in his work environment of any motive that might have prompted his actions. They found no evidence that he told anyone, be it family, friends or doctors, what he was going to do.

The case has prompted a debate in Germany about the country’s strict patient privacy rules. Doctors risk prison if they disclose information about their patients to anyone unless there is evidence they intend to commit a serious crime or harm themselves.

The head of the German Medical Association, Dr. Frank-Ulrich Montgomery, warned against hasty changes to the rules, saying that each case should be judged individually.

He noted that doctors can already notify authorities if, for example, a professional driver is an alcoholic.

At the crash site in the French Alps, meanwhile, authorities were poring over DNA evidence that has been painstakingly collected from the debris of Flight 9525, scattered across the steep mountainside. Authorities have identified 78 sets of DNA so far, according to the Marseille prosecutor’s office, as they strive to identify all the victims for the grieving relatives who have poured into France by the hundreds.

Workers with backhoes and tractors were laying down a road just over a mile (2 kilometers) long Monday to reach the remote crash site to help speed the investigation. Until now, recovery crews have had to helicopter in and be tethered to local mountaineers to avoid slipping down the rocky, unstable slope.

France has deployed some 500 officers and emergency workers to secure the crash site, search for human remains, examine evidence and help the traumatized relatives.

TIME

JetBlue Systems Back Online After Major Outage

Passengers exit a JetBlue Airways Corp. plane at Long Beach Airport (LGB) in Long Beach, California, U.S., on Monday, July 22, 2013.
Bloomberg&Bloomberg — Getty Images Passengers exit a JetBlue Airways Corp. plane at Long Beach Airport (LGB) in Long Beach, California, U.S., on Monday, July 22, 2013.

JetBlue said the outage was not due to a cyber attack

JetBlue Airways Corp’s systems are back online after a computer system outage caused check-in delays at several U.S. airports on Monday.

The outage was not due to a cyber attack, JetBlue spokesman Doug McGraw said in an email to Reuters.

“The issue was resolved at approximately 6:15 a.m. Eastern Time,” McGraw said “We are working to resume normal operations now.”

McGraw did not provide details on what exactly what caused the outage.

According to NBC News, the airline was forced to issue handwritten boarding passes to passengers at many airports.

This article originally appeared on Fortune.com and includes information from Reuters

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