TIME justice

Inquiries Begin Into Nude Celebrity Photo Leaks

86th Annual Academy Awards - Arrivals
Actress Jennifer Lawrence attends the 86th Oscars held at Hollywood & Highland Center on March 2, 2014 in Hollywood. Jeff Vespa—WireImage/Getty Images

(LOS ANGELES) — The FBI said Monday it was addressing allegations that online accounts of several celebrities, including Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence, had been hacked, leading to the posting of their nude photographs online.

The agency did not say what actions it was taking to investigate who was responsible for posting naked photos of Lawrence and other stars. Apple said Monday it was looking into whether its online photo-sharing service had been hacked to obtain the intimate images.

Lawrence, a three-time Oscar nominee who won for her role in “Silver Linings Playbook,” contacted authorities after the images began appearing Sunday.

Naked images purporting to be of other female stars were also posted, although the authenticity of many couldn’t be confirmed. The source of the leak was unclear.

“This is a flagrant violation of privacy,” Lawrence’s publicist Liz Mahoney wrote in a statement. “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence.”

The FBI said it was “aware of the allegations concerning computer intrusions and the unlawful release of material involving high profile individuals, and is addressing the matter.”

“Any further comment would be inappropriate at this time,” spokeswoman Laura Eimiller wrote in a statement.

Apple Inc. spokeswoman Natalie Kerris said the company was investigating whether any iCloud accounts had been tampered with, but she did not give any further details.

“We take user privacy very seriously and are actively investigating this report,” she said.

Actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead also confirmed that nude photos of her were posted online.

“To those of you looking at photos I took with my husband years ago in the privacy of our home, hope you feel great about yourselves,” Winstead posted on Twitter. Winstead, who starred in “Final Destination 3″ and “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter,” wrote that she thought the images had been destroyed.

“Knowing those photos were deleted long ago, I can only imagine the creepy effort that went into this,” Winstead wrote.

The FBI has investigated previous leaks of nude celebrity images, including leaks involving Scarlett Johansson, Mila Kunis, Christina Aguilera and footage of television sports reporter Erin Andrews in a Tennessee hotel room. Those cases resulted in convictions.

How widespread the hacking of celebrities photos was is not immediately clear. Some of the images were quickly denounced as fakes.

Some cybersecurity experts speculated that hackers may have obtained a cache of private celebrity images by exploiting weaknesses in an online image-storing platform.

“It is important for celebrities and the general public to remember that images and data no longer just reside on the device that captured it,” security researcher Ken Westin wrote in a blog post Monday. “Once images and other data are uploaded to the cloud, it becomes much more difficult to control who has access to it, even if we think it is private.”

Private information and images of celebrities are frequent targets for hackers. Last year, a site posted credit reports, Social Security numbers and other financial info on celebrities, including Jay Z and his wife Beyonce, Mel Gibson, Ashton Kutcher and many others.

Johansson, Kunis and Aguilera were hacked by a Florida man, Christopher Chaney, who used publicly available information to hack into the email accounts of more than 50 people in the entertainment industry.

“I have been truly humiliated and embarrassed,” Johansson said in a tearful videotaped statement played in court at Chaney’s sentencing in December 2012.

“That feeling of security can never be given back and there is no compensation that can restore the feeling one has from such a large invasion of privacy,” Aguilera wrote in a statement before Chaney’s sentencing.

TIME Military

The U.S. Should Not Wage War Against ISIS Like Afghanistan and Iraq

Iraqi security forces and Shi'ite militias advance towards town of Amerli from their position in the Ajana
Some of the Iraqi security forces who helped free the town of Amerli over the weekend with help from U.S. airstrikes. REUTERS

But those two campaigns offer clues on how it should be done

The U.S. waged two effective short-term wars following 9/11. Unfortunately, the nation then grafted them onto far more ambitious enterprises that not only drove their costs, in American blood and treasure, through the roof, but also sowed the seeds for failure.

That’s the key takeaway to keep in mind as President Obama weighs what to do about the rampage now being conducted by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria in both of those nations.

Over the Labor Day weekend, U.S. air power, combined with Iraqi help on the ground, broke a two-month ISIS siege of the village of Amerli in northern Iraq. The militants had been tightening a noose around the farming town, cutting off water, food and power, and residents had begun dying. Finally, beginning late Saturday, a handful of U.S. airstrikes let Iraqi forces and militias break the siege.

While President Obama said the strikes would be “limited in their scope and duration,” their success offers a template, in miniature, for a broader U.S.-led campaign against the Islamist militant group.

It would mark a departure from recent U.S.-led wars. “No one is advocating unilateral invasion, occupation or nation-building,” Republican senators John McCain of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina wrote in a weekend op-ed column in the New York Times, urging stepped-up U.S. military action against ISIS. “This should be more like Afghanistan in 2001, where limited numbers of advisers helped local forces, with airstrikes and military aid, to rout an extremist army.”

In Afghanistan, the U.S. waged a month-long campaign that drove the Taliban from Kabul. It relied on U.S. airpower and special operators on the ground, working with local anti-Taliban forces. Then, the U.S. launched a 13-year effort, still underway, to build an Afghan government immune to the Taliban.

Many Taliban fled to Pakistan, where they continue to plot to retake power in Afghanistan once U.S. combat units pull out at the end of 2014. There’s an echo of that Taliban sanctuary in Pakistan in ISIS’s presence in Syria. Any beefed-up campaign against ISIS militants is going to have to attack their targets in both nations.

In Iraq, the U.S. military pushed Saddam Hussein from Baghdad less than three weeks after invading the country. But the U.S. soon became mired in an eight-year nation-building effort that failed to build a nation. In both Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S., despite its best intentions, helped install leaders who have done little to lead their countries to a better place.

And that exposes the futility of the so-called “Pottery Barn rule.” Retired Army general and then-Secretary of State Colin Powell summed it up by saying the U.S. had responsibility for the nations it invaded: “If you break it, you own it.”

But war isn’t always about creating something better. Sometimes it’s simply about ridding the world of terrorists whose zealotry compels them to kill innocents.

For a warrior-diplomat renowned for his earlier guidelines on going to war—the so-called Powell doctrine required a clear and obtainable objective before the first bombs fell—the Pottery Barn rule proved daunting.

Actually, Pottery Barn doesn’t have such a rule. If a customer stumbles into a vase and sends it crashing to the floor, the company writes it off as a cost of doing business. It’s past time for the U.S. government to scrap its misinterpretation of the so-called rule.

War isn’t a positive experience for anyone, and all involved are ill-served by pretending otherwise.

If the U.S. deems ISIS to be a threat to U.S. national security, the U.S. military, backed by Presidential order and a Congressional declaration, should wage unrelenting attacks against it. Instead of embracing Powell’s view, the nation would be better served thinking of war as 17th Century English philosopher Thomas Hobbes viewed human life without government: “nasty, brutish and short.”

TIME White House

Biden Celebrates Labor Day With Call For ‘Fair Wage’

A job's about a lot more than a paycheck. It's about your dignity, it's about your place in the community, it's about who you are."

Vice President Joe Biden celebrated Labor Day with a call for a “fair wage” at a union rally for workers in Detroit on Monday.

“Folks, the middle class is in real trouble now,” Biden said to an enthusiastic crowd. “A job’s about a lot more than a paycheck. It’s about your dignity, it’s about your place in the community, it’s about who you are.”

Biden’s 20-minute speech employed a populist and personal tone as he took on everything from the estate tax to American corporations that have moved operations overseas.

Biden, who is known for his blue collar roots, referenced his family roots and his ties to labor.

“‘Joey, you’re labor from belt buckle to shoe sole,'” Biden said his uncle told him.

 

TIME Crime

Ferguson Cops Start Using Body Cameras in Wake of Unrest

Police chief says officers "are really enjoying them"

+ READ ARTICLE

Law enforcement officers in Ferguson, Mo. attached body cameras to their uniforms while policing a peaceful demonstration on Saturday, three weeks after the fatal shooting of an unarmed teenager by a police officer triggered violent clashes between police and protestors in the St. Louis suburb.

Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson told the St. Louis Post—Dispatch that his department received a donation of 50 wearable cameras from two surveillance companies last week. The company representatives led the department in a training session on Saturday. “They are really enjoying them,” Jackson said of the body cameras, which captured video and audio recordings at a protest march on Saturday.

Advocates of a “Mike Brown Law,” named after the teenager who was shot by Ferguson officer Darren Wilson, have petitioned for a law that would require police to wear body cameras at all times during their patrols to increase transparency.

Concerns about cost and a dearth of research into their effectiveness have hampered widespread adoption of the surveillance technique.

[St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

TIME Music

NYC’s Electric Zoo Festival Got Shut Down by Bad Weather

Electric Zoo 2013 - Day 2
A general view of atmosphere during the Electric Zoo Festival at Randall's Island, in New York City, on Aug. 31, 2013 Daniel Zuchnik—Getty Images

“We apologize to fans, but your safety is our main concern,” say organizers

New York City’s Electric Zoo Festival was shut down midway Aug. 31, with organizers citing treacherous weather conditions as the cause for cancellation.

Rolling Stone reported that there were still six hours left for the festival to end when attendees were asked to evacuate the grounds at Randall’s Island, where the popular music festival takes place. Chase & Status, Alesso, Bingo Players and Kaskade were some of the acts scheduled to perform on the final evening.

The final day of Electric Zoo was canceled last year as well, but for very different reasons: city officials forced the festival to a halt after two attendees succumbed to drug overdoses and four others were hospitalized. There were also 31 arrests made.

A flash-flood warning was issued just before the event was halted, following which the festival tweeted: “Electric Zoo NY has been shut down for the remainder of the festival due to extreme weather conditions. We apologize to fans, but your safety is our main concern.”

The organizers also made it clear that there would be no re-entry even if weather conditions improved, but have not yet revealed whether festivalgoers would be reimbursed for the canceled day, Rolling Stone said.

EDM artist Kaskade, whose show was among those canceled, took to Twitter to express his displeasure. “Soooooo…… Who has the keys to @barclayscenter???” he joked.

[Rolling Stone]

TIME cities

Three Atlantic City Casinos Will Go Dark This Month

Slew Of Casino Closures Threatens To Take Toll On Atlantic City
A man gambles at the Showboat casino, which is scheduled to close, in Atlantic City, N.J., on July 29, 2014 Spencer Platt—Getty Images

September is expected to be hard month for Atlantic City, as three of its casinos deal out their last hands

Three casinos will close this month in Atlantic City, N.J., signaling that this metropolis of neon lights and blinking slot machines can no longer bet on gaming revenues.

More than 5,000 workers will be out of a job when the casinos Showboat and Revel close this weekend, the Associated Press reports. Even more will lose their livelihoods when the Trump Plaza cuts its lights on Sept. 16.

The expected closure of the three casinos, one of which is just two years old, is the latest slap to this city, coming just eight months after the Atlantic Club ran out of luck. By the end of September, more than 25% of the city’s casino workforce, or 8,000 people, will be out of work, the New York Times reports.

When New Jersey legalized gaming in 1976, casinos were marketed as a sure bet for economically battered Atlantic City, the AP reports. But the regional gaming market has since become flush with competitors, with casinos in New York, Delaware and Pennsylvania claiming chunks of the once prodigious profits flowing into Atlantic City. Even Massachusetts, a once gaming-averse state, is eyeing a share of the rewards, as it flirts with inviting three casinos to the state.

TIME weather

Stormy Weather Chases Summer Away Over Labor Day Weekend

So long, summer

The Labor Day weekend, the unofficial end of summer, has been wet, windy and distinctly unsummery in many parts of the U.S., with strong thunderstorms expected through the middle of the country and into the Northeast.

While conditions for possible tornadoes settled down significantly Sunday, a strong jet stream that dipped south over the weekend dropped heavy rain that created floods in the Lower Mississippi Valley. Several feet of standing water left stalled and stranded cars Saturday on the streets of Lake Charles, Louisiana.

Read more from our partners at NBC News

TIME Germany

Last Known Survivor of Hindenburg Flight Crew Dies at 92

Kubis Franz
Werner Franz, with fellow survivor Heinrich Kubis, a steward, in Lakehurst, N.J., on May 7, 1937 AP

Werner Franz jumped out of the flaming airship as it crashed to the ground

A German man thought to be the last surviving flight crew member of the Hindenburg airship that crashed 77 years ago has died at the age of 92.

Werner Franz suffered a heart attack on Aug. 13 in his hometown of Frankfurt, Germany, the Associated Press reports.

Franz was working as a cabin boy at the age of 14 when the Zeppelin caught fire and crashed into Lakehurst, N.J., on May 6, 1937, killing a total of 36. The incident has become one of the most iconic aircraft accidents in history, partly due to broadcast coverage of the disaster and Herbert Morrison famously crying out, “Oh, the humanity!” during his eyewitness report.

Franz jumped out of the aircraft as it was falling to the ground and escaped “without a scratch on him,” historian and friend John Provan said.

“Werner was most fortunate because he was in the officers’ mess cleaning up,” Provan told the AP. “Above him was a large tank of water that burst open and drenched him, which protected him a bit from the flames and the heat.”

Three other survivors of the crash are believed to be still alive, according to Navy Lakehurst Historical Society president Carl Jablonski: Werner Doehner and Horst Schirmer, both passengers, and Robert Buchanan, a member of the ground crew that had been waiting to secure the airship.

[AP]

TIME Crime

Bikini Coffee Shop Owner Hit With Prostitution Charges

Baristas at "Java Juggs" were allegedly serving up more than just cappuccinos

For the past few years, some coffee shops in Washington state have been taking the idea of customer service a little too far.

A former owner of a Seattle-area “bikini coffee shop” was charged with money laundering and promoting prostitution Thursday, after her baristas allegedly served up sex acts to customers as well as hot drinks, CBS News reports.

Documents claim the “bikini baristas” charged $14 to flash their genitals or breasts at customers, and more for sexual acts.

Prosecutors in Shnohomish County allege that Carmela Panico collected more than $2 million in three years through her illegal business offerings. Panico, a former erotic dancer, managed to skip out on paying her full taxes by operating largely in cash — officials found more than $250,000 during a home raid in 2013.

She may have also had some help from the inside: authorities allege that Darrell O’Neill, a sheriff’s sergeant, gave Panico and her employees the heads-up about police investigations in return for sexual favors.

The coffee stand, Java Juggs, was one of seven locations police busted for charges related to prostitution and lewd contact. According to court documents, Panico would dock employees’ pay if the women weren’t wearing high heels or adequate makeup.

An attorney for Panico said the 52-year-old, feeling a little burned by the coffee business, has left the industry for good.

[CBS News]

TIME Crime

Ferguson Rally Marks 3 Weeks After Brown’s Death

Rally Held in Ferguson Over Police Killing Of Michael Brown
Michael Brown Sr. joins demonstrators at a rally for Michael Brown, Aug. 30, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri. Aaron P. Bernstein—Getty Images

FERGUSON, Mo. — Hundreds converged on Ferguson on Saturday to march for Michael Brown, the unarmed black 18-year-old who was shot and killed by a white police officer three weeks ago to the day. His death stoked national discourse about police tactics and race, which the rally’s organizers pledged to continue.

Led by Brown’s parents and other relatives, Saturday’s throng peacefully made their way down Canfield Drive in the St. Louis suburb to a makeshift memorial that marked the spot where Brown was shot Aug. 9 by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson.

“We know that his life is not going to be in vain,” the Rev. Spencer Booker of St. Louis’ St. Paul A.M.E. Church said into a megaphone, standing in the middle of the street amid candles, placards, stuffed animals and now-wilted flowers. “We know you’re going to even the score, God. We know you’re going to make the wrong right.”

Brown’s parents — mother Lesley McSpadden and father Michael Brown Sr. — encircled the memorial with other family members during prayers, including one by a Muslim clergy member.

Wilson, a six-year police veteran, has not been charged. A St. Louis County grand jury is considering evidence in the case, and federal investigators are sorting out whether Brown’s civil rights were violated.

There was a muted police presence Saturday during the march, which began on a West Florissant Avenue stretch that became the nexus of nightly protests — some contentious and violent — and looting in the days after Brown’s death. Many of the businesses’ windows remain boarded up, though most have reopened. Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, whom Missouri’s governor put in charge of security in Ferguson, was there, at times posing with rally attendees for selfies.

Saturday’s gathering included tailgaters and people hawking T-shirts memorializing Brown or featuring slogan, “Hands up, Don’t Shoot” — a phrase that reflects what witnesses have said Brown did in surrender before being shot. Police have said the shooting happened after a struggle between Brown and Wilson in Wilson’s patrol vehicle, though authorities have said little else, citing the investigations.

“We’re just three weeks into this, and this is only the beginning of this movement,” said Jerryl Christmas, a St. Louis attorney who helped lead Saturday’s march and others in the past. He’s intent on keeping Brown and the resulting turmoil and questions “in the forefront of America.”

“We want the president to come here. He remarked that he didn’t have a strategy for ISIS and Syria, but we need a strategy for urban America,” Christmas said. “The tragedy is this could have happened anywhere.”

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