TIME People

See How This Man Surprised His Wife in the Hospital for Their 57th Anniversary

"I've known her since she was in pigtails"

A Georgia couple that typically enjoys a “low key” anniversary had a high-profile celebration last week.

Jim Russell surprised his wife, Elinor, on their 57th anniversary on May 20 by showing up to her hospital room wearing a tuxedo and carrying flowers and chocolate, ABC reported last week. The story had first gone viral after their granddaughter shared photos of the special moment on Twitter, eventually amassing over 60,000 favorites:

The tuxedo Jim wore was the same one that he’d warm to go ballroom dancing with Elinor, whom he has “known since she was in pigtails.” Afterwards, they watched their two favorite shows — Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy — while dining in the hospital room.

“Being in a hospital bed, you get bored, ” said Elinor. “So when they came in, it made me smile, like the younger days when we were dancing.”

[ABC]

TIME Crime

Woman Found Pushing Dead 3-Year-Old Son in Swing

The mother was taken to a local hospital for a mental evaluation

Police report that a 24-year-old woman was found pushing her dead 3-year-old son in a swing at a Maryland park on Friday.

Officers first responded to the park at just before 7 a.m. after receiving calls about a woman who had been pushing a child in a swing for an unusually long period of time. Police said that the woman, who is not being identified, may have been at the La Plata park since the day before, according to WUSA.

When officers went to take the child out of the swing, “it was instantaneously clear the child was dead,” Charles County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Diane Richardson told the Associated Press.

The child’s body, which showed no signs of physical trauma, was sent to the Officer of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore. His mother was taken to a local hospital for a mental evaluation, where she remained Saturday morning, WUSA reports.

“It’s a very sad and tragic situation for the mother, her family, the officers,” Richardson said. “All of us want answers. We’re working very hard on that.”

This article originally appeared on People.com

TIME People

A Beautiful Mind Mathematician Killed in New Jersey Taxi Crash

John Nash and his wife, Alicia Nash, died Saturday

John Forbes Nash Jr., the subject of the 2001 Oscar-winning film A Beautiful Mind, and his wife were killed Saturday in a taxi crash on the New Jersey Turnpike, police said.

Nash, 86, and Alicia Nash, 82, were in the taxi when the driver lost control and crashed into a guard rail, NJ.com reported. No charges were expected to be filed in the crash, according to the Middlesex County prosecutor’s office.

Nash, a longtime resident of Princeton Junction, N.J., won the 1994 Nobel Prize in Economics for his work on game theory. His genius in economics and mathematics, in addition to his struggle with schizophrenia, became the subject of his 1998 biography, which years later inspired the film A Beautiful Mind.

The actor Russell Crowe, who played Nash in the movie, posted his condolences on Twitter, calling them “beautiful minds, beautiful hearts.”

Princeton University, where Nash worked as a mathematician, said in a statement the community was “stunned and saddened” by the news of the deaths of Nash and his wife.

[NJ.com]

TIME States

Firefighter Dies as Floods Hit Oklahoma, Texas

He was swept away by floodwaters during a rescue

(WIMBERLEY, Texas)—Flooding in Texas and Oklahoma has led to numerous evacuations and rescues and the death of a firefighter.

The heavy rains were pushing into eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma on Sunday morning.

Rogers County Emergency Management spokesman Thomas Hudson says a firefighter in the northeast Oklahoma town of Claremore died early Sunday after being swept away by floodwaters during a rescue. And residents in Cleveland and Comanche counties in Oklahoma had to be rescued from attics and roofs.

In Central Texas, rain caused the Blanco River in Hays County to rise to a record level Saturday, forcing authorities to evacuate residents.

Hays County Sheriff’s Lt. Jeri Skrocki says numerous rescues were conducted in the community of Wimberley, about 40 miles southwest of Austin. No serious injuries were reported.

TIME Basketball

LeBron James Asks Cleveland Protesters to Rally Behind Cavaliers

"For the city of Cleveland, let's use our excitement or whatever passion that we have for our sport"

Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James on Saturday addressed a string of peaceful protests against the acquittal of a white cop in the shooting deaths of two unarmed black people.

“For the city of Cleveland, let’s use our excitement or whatever passion that we have for our sport tomorrow for the game tomorrow night, bring [the passion] to the game [Sunday] night,” James said, according to Sports Illustrated. “And as our team, we’ll try to do our best to give it back to them.”

James declined to comment on the specifics of the case, which earlier on Saturday ended in the acquittal officer Michael Brelo of criminal charges for the deaths of Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams in 2012.

“Violence is not the answer, and it’s all about trying to find a solution for good or for bad,” James said. “For me, in any case, anything that goes on in our world or in our America, the only people that we should be worried about [are] the families that’s lost loved ones. You can’t get them back. You can never get them back. We should worry about the families and how they’re doing and things of that nature.”

[Sports Illustrated]

TIME Crime

Cleveland Streets Calm a Day After Protest of Police Officer’s Acquittal

More than a dozen protesters were arrested Saturday night for failing to disperse

(CLEVELAND)—The streets largely remained calm Sunday morning after police in riot gear made numerous arrests overnight of protesters angered by a patrolman’s acquittal in the deaths of two unarmed black suspects in a barrage of police gunfire.

Michael Brelo, 31, faces administrative charges while remaining suspended without pay after he was found not guilty Saturday on two counts of voluntary manslaughter, but he no longer faces the prospect of prison. The anxious city now awaits a decision on criminal charges against a white officer in the fatal shooting of a black 12-year-old boy with a pellet gun.

Brelo and 12 other officers fired 137 shots at a car with Timothy Russell and Malissa Williams inside it on Nov. 29, 2012. The shooting occurred at the end of a 22-mile chase involving more than 100 Cleveland police officers and 60 cruisers after Russell’s Chevy Malibu backfired while speeding past police headquarters. During the chase, an officer reported that he thought he’d seen Williams with a gun. At the end, police mistook police gunfire for shots from Russell’s car.

Brelo fired 49 of those shots that night, but it was the final 15 fired into the windshield while he stood on the hood of Russell’s car that led to his indictment and a four-week trial. He faced up to 22 years in prison if convicted on both counts.

The shooting helped prompt an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice that concluded Cleveland police had engaged in a pattern and practice of excessive use of force and violations of people’s civil rights.

Angry but mostly orderly protests followed Saturday’s verdict. More than a dozen protesters were arrested Saturday night for failing to disperse from an alley in the city’s Warehouse District on downtown’s west side, deputy police chief Wayne Drummond said. Several other people were arrested elsewhere downtown.

The first protest formed outside the Justice Center Saturday morning while Judge John P. O’Donnell read from his 35-page verdict.

A larger protest of around 200 people gathered at noon near where Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty lives. Both protests later merged at a recreation center where 12-year-old Tamir Rice was killed by a rookie patrol officer last November. While that demonstration became boisterous, with Eugene Rice angrily calling for justice for his grandson, it remained peaceful.

An investigation into the Tamir Rice shooting is nearly complete and will be given to the prosecutor’s office to decide whether to pursue criminal charges.

Alicia Kirkman, 47, of Cleveland, said she joined the march in honor of her son, killed in a police shooting eight years ago.

“I’m just so mad we never get justice from any of the police killings,” said Kirkman, who said she settled with the city after her son’s death but no charges were filed.

The judge said in his ruling that he wouldn’t “sacrifice” Brelo to the wave of anti-police sentiment that has swept across the nation in the wake of other police in-custody deaths. While protests in cities like Baltimore, New York City and Ferguson, Missouri, have erupted into violence, the demonstrations in Cleveland didn’t escalate.

The judge’s decision to acquit Brelo focused on which shots killed Russell, 43, and Williams, 30, two homeless drug addicts with a long history of mental illness. Four of the 23 gunshot wounds to Russell and seven of Williams’ 24 wounds were believed to have been fatal. O’Donnell said that while testimony showed Brelo fired some of the fatal shots, other officers fired kill shots as well.

A grand jury charged five police supervisors with misdemeanor dereliction of duty for failing to control the chase. All five have pleaded not guilty and no trial date has been set.

Prosecutors had argued that when Brelo stood on the hood of the Malibu that he meant to kill Russell and Williams instead of containing a threat to his and other officers’ lives. O’Donnell ruled that even the last 15 shots were justified based on Brelo’s belief that someone inside the car had fired at police at the beginning, middle and end of the chase.

“Officer Brelo risked his life on that night,” Brelo’s lead attorney, Patrick D’Angelo, said after the verdict.

McGinty said he respected O’Donnell’s decision, and added that the case would prevent police violence.

In addition to the Tamir Rice case, the county prosecutor’s office is looking into the death of a black woman who died in police custody while lying face first on the ground in handcuffs. The family of Tanisha Anderson, 37, has sued the city of Cleveland and the two police officers who subdued her. They say she panicked Nov. 12 when officers put her in the back of a patrol car after they’d responded to a call about Anderson having a mental health crisis.

Russell’s sister, Michelle, said Brelo would ultimately face justice, despite the judge’s decision. The city ofCleveland has paid the families of Russell and Williams a total of $3 million to settle a federal civil rights lawsuit.

“He’s not going to dodge this just because he was acquitted,” Michelle Russell said. “God will have the final say.”

TIME Military

Why Do We Celebrate Memorial Day?

This is the real meaning of the holiday

It’s easy to forget what Memorial Day actually means while you’re sitting by the pool and looking ahead at summer vacation—but the day signifies much more than just a three-day weekend.

Memorial Day is a solemn day of remembrance for everyone who has died serving in the American armed forces. The holiday, originally known as Decoration Day, started after the Civil War to honor the Union and Confederate dead.

It’s unclear exactly where the holiday originated—Charleston, S.C., Waterloo, N.Y., Columbus, Ga. and other towns all claim to be the birthplace of the holiday. The event in Charleston that may have precipitated the holiday offers poignant evidence of a country struggling to rebuild itself after a bloody war: 257 Union soldiers died in prison in Charleston during the Civil War and were buried in unmarked graves, and the town’s black residents organized a May Day ceremony in which they landscaped a burial ground to properly honor the soldiers.

In the years following the Civil War, Memorial Day celebrations were scattered and, perhaps unsurprisingly, took root differently in the North and South. It wasn’t until after World War II that the holiday gained a strong following and national identity, and it wasn’t officially named Memorial Day until 1967.

The final event that cemented the modern culture of Memorial Day in America was in 1968 when Congress passed the Uniform Holiday Act, designating Memorial Day as the last Monday in May rather than May 30, as it had previously been observed. This ensured a three-day weekend and gave the day its current status as the unofficial beginning of summer, mixing serious reflection with more lighthearted fun.

TIME weather

Heavy Rain Threatens to Wash Out Memorial Day Weekend

Severe thunderstorms were predicted across much of the country

Millions of Americans were under the threat of flash floods this Memorial Day weekend as heavy rain was forecast for waterlogged parts of Texas, Arkansas and the southern Plains.

Thunderstorms in the Midwest, Plains, Texas threatened to bring hail, wind and even isolated tornadoes on Saturday and Sunday, the Weather Channel said.

Average rainfall of up to 3 inches is possible over the next week in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri and parts of Louisiana and Arkansas, with high spots of 5 inches more possible.

“Additional flash flooding is likely with already saturated grounds and creeks, streams and rivers at bank…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Crime

How Police Tracked Down the Man Accused of Murdering a D.C. Family

daron-dylon-wint-composite
Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police Department

See a timeline of events

A weeklong manhunt for the killer of a wealthy Washington, D.C., family and their housekeeper has ended with the arrest of a welder who once worked for the family’s patriarch. The arrest doesn’t answer all the unanswered questions, but here’s a timeline of what’s known so far.

May 13

Savvas Savopoulos, the 46-year-old CEO of American Iron Works, is cleaning a martial-arts study he owns in Northern Virginia. Nelitza Gutierrez, a housekeeper for Savopoulos and his family, is there helping.

Savopoulos gets a 5:30 p.m. call from his wife, Amy, 47, telling him to come home to watch their 10-year-old…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

TIME Courts

Cleveland Cop Acquitted in Shooting Deaths of 2 Unarmed Suspects

In this April 9, 2015, file photo, Cleveland police Officer Michael Brelo listens to testimony during his trial in Cleveland.
Tony Dejak—AP In this April 9, 2015, file photo, Cleveland police Officer Michael Brelo listens to testimony during his trial in Cleveland.

Michael Brelo could have faced up to 22 years in prison

(CLEVELAND)—A white Cleveland patrolman who fired down through the windshield of a suspect’s car at the end of a 137-shot barrage that left the two unarmed black occupants dead was acquitted Saturday of criminal charges by a judge who said he could not determine the officer alone fired the fatal shots.

Michael Brelo, 31, put his head in hands as the judge issued a verdict followed by angry, but peaceful, protests: Outside the courthouse police blocked furious protesters from going inside while across the city others held a mock funeral with some carrying signs asking, “Will I be next?”

The acquittal came at a time of nationwide tension among police and black citizens punctuated by protests over deaths of black suspects at the hands of white officers — and following a determination by the U.S. Department of Justice that Cleveland police had a history of using excessive force and violating civil rights.

Before issuing his verdict, Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Judge John P. O’Donnell reflected on the unrest. “In many American places people are angry with, mistrusting and fearful of the police,” he said. “Citizens think the men and women sworn to protect and serve have violated that oath or never meant it in the first place.”

But O’Donnell said he would not offer up Brelo to an angry public if the evidence did not merit a conviction.

“I will not sacrifice him,” O’Donnell said.

Brelo — who fired a total of 49 shots, including 15 down through the windshield while standing on the hood of the suspects’ vehicle — faced as many as 22 years in prison had the judge convicted him on two counts of voluntary manslaughter in the deaths that happened after Timothy Russell’s beat-up Chevy Malibu backfired outside police headquarters.

Russell’s sister, Michelle Russell, said she believed Brelo would ultimately face justice.

“He’s not going to dodge this just because he was acquitted,” she said. “God will have the final say.”

The U.S. Justice Department, U.S. Attorney’s Office and the FBI will review the testimony and evidence and examine all available legal options, said Vanita Gupta, head of the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division.

About 200 people walked in a mock funeral procession that had already been planned to mark six months since another deadly shooting that sparked anger in Cleveland’s black community: the killing of Tamir Rice, a black 12-year-old carrying a pellet gun who was shot by a white rookie officer.

Protesters carried a black, plywood coffin and softly sang “I’m going up yonder, we’re marching, we’re marching.”

Some carried signs saying “I Can’t Breathe” and “Freddie Gray Lynched,” references to a pair of deadly police encounters: the chokehold death of Eric Garner in New York City and the death of a Baltimore man who suffered a spinal injury while in custody.

After the verdict, sheriff’s deputies stood in front of the courthouse carrying clear shields as protesters chanted “Hands up! Don’t shoot!” — a rallying cry linked to the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. One demonstrator bowed his head, hands folded, in front of the phalanx of deputies, praying in silence. Demonstrators later marched through the streets toward the recreation center where Rice was killed.

The unusual timing of the verdict — a Saturday morning on a holiday weekend — was intentional, court officials said. The county’s top judge said it would prevent traffic issues downtown and lessen the impact on the community.

When he took the bench, O’Donnell spent nearly an hour explaining his decision, even using mannequins marked with the gunshot wounds the two motorists suffered on Nov. 29, 2012.

Brelo could have been convicted of lesser charges, but O’Donnell determined his actions were justified following the chase, which included reports of shots fired from Russell’s car, because officers perceived a threat.

Brelo’s lead attorney, Patrick D’Angelo, said Brelo had been unfairly prosecuted in a case that he called a “blood fight.”

“Officer Brelo risked his life on that night,” D’Angelo said.

Cuyahoga County prosecutor Tim McGinty said he respects the judge’s decision and urged others to do so, as well. He said the case illustrated hard truths.

“This tragic experience has already forced a culture change within the division of police and a needed reexamination of the use of deadly force,” he said.

Thirteen officers fired at the car with Russell and Malissa Williams inside after a 22-mile high-speed chase that involved 62 marked and unmarked cars and reached 100 mph. Brelo was the only officer charged because prosecutors said he waited until the pair was no longer a threat to fire his final 15 rounds.

Russell, 43, and Williams, 30, were each shot more than 20 times. Prosecutors argued they were alive until Brelo’s final salvo but medical examiners for both sides testified they could not determine the order in which the deadly shots were fired.

Brelo has been on unpaid leave since he was indicted last May. Police Chief Calvin Williams said it will continue during disciplinary reviews for him and the other 12 officers.

Authorities never learned why Russell didn’t stop. He had a criminal record including convictions for receiving stolen property and robbery and had been involved in a previous police pursuit. Williams had convictions for drug-related charges and attempted abduction. Both were described as mentally ill, homeless and addicted to drugs. A crack pipe was found in the car.

The shooting helped prompt an investigation by the Department of Justice, which concluded the department had engaged in a pattern and practice of using excessive force and violating civil rights. The city and DOJ are currently negotiating over reforms.

In addition to the charges against Brelo, a grand jury charged five police supervisors with misdemeanor dereliction of duty for failing to control the chase. All five have pleaded not guilty and no trial date has been set.

“Our pursuit of justice for Timothy Russell and Melissa Williams is not over,” McGinty said.

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