TIME LGBT

Rick Santorum on Bruce Jenner: ‘If He Says He’s a Woman, Then He’s a Woman’

The former Senator has sparked past controversies over opposition to gay rights

Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, whose past opposition to gay rights has sparked backlash from LGBT rights groups, spoke Saturday in support of Bruce Jenner after the Olympian and TV personality came out publicly as transgender.

Santorum told reporters at a Republican convention in South Carolina that “if [Jenner] says he’s a woman, then he’s a woman,” CBS News reports. “My responsibility as a human being is to love and accept everybody. Not to criticize people for who they are.” The former lawmaker is said to be eyeing a 2016 presidential bid after losing the 2012 Republican nomination to Mitt Romney.

“I can criticize, and I do, for what people do, for their behavior. But as far as for who they are, you have to respect everybody, and these are obviously complex issues for businesses, for society,” Santorum said. “And I think we have to look at it in a way that is compassionate and respectful of everybody.”

The politician’s support of Jenner’s transition arrives two weeks after Santorum made headlines for stating he would not attend a same-sex marriage of a friend or family member, as it would be a “a violation of [his] faith.”

[CBS News]

TIME Aviation

Private Jets Overwhelm Vegas Airport Before Mayweather-Pacquiao Fight

Pictures showed the lot packed with private planes and jets, parked wing-to-wing

Numerous celebrities were on hand to watch Floyd Mayweather Jr. beat Manny Pacquiao in Saturday night’s “Fight of the Century” in Las Vegas, and they apparently didn’t fly coach to get there.

Las Vegas’s main commercial airport, McCarran International, was reportedly closed to private planes on Saturday after celebrities packed the airport with their parked jets, according to Sports Illustrated.

In several images posted to Twitter, the airport lot is filled with private planes and jets, parked wing-to-wing.

Fox 11 Los Angeles sports reporter Liz Habib tweeted a shot of the humorous scene, writing “Private Jets at Las Vegas airport!!! Wing to wing – airport closed now to private planes #MayPac.”

Musician and producer Emilio Estefan, who was headed to the boxing match, also tweeted an image of the full lot at McCarran. “Arrived in #LasVegas to a #SoldOut airport! Ready for the big fight tonight #MayweatherPacquiao #Boxing,” he wrote on Saturday.

The match, which drew big-name attendees including Beyoncé, Jay, Mark Wahlberg, Justin Bieber and Tom Brady, was the biggest payday in boxing history. Pacquiao and Mayweather were estimated to split $300 million before even entering the ring at Las Vegas’s Grand Garden Arena. Many celebs bet big on the match, including Wahlberg, who went head-to-head with Diddy for a cool $250,000.

Officials for McCarran International said it was expected to reach record volume, and airport officials were directing passengers to nearby, less familiar airports, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported on Friday.

Rita Carrillo, manager for Signature Flight Support, one of the companies receiving private planes at McCarran, also told the newspaper that the weekend’s estimated volume was the largest she could remember in her 30 years at the airport.

“I don’t think people realize the magnitude of this event,” Carrillo said, continuing, “and the type of clientele that is coming in to see us.”

This article originally appeared on People.com

TIME police

Baltimore Lifts Curfew Imposed 6 Days Ago After Riots

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake speaks at a news conference outside the Mondawmin Mall in Baltimore, Maryland
Eric Thayer—Reuters Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake speaks at a news conference outside the Mondawmin Mall in Baltimore on May 3, 2015.

The city erupted Monday night in the wake of Freddie Gray's death

(BALTIMORE) — 5 p.m.

Several hundred jubilant people prayed and chanted for justice at a rally near Baltimore’s City Hall organized by faith leaders. The rally comes days after the city’s top prosecutor charged six officers in the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died after being injured in police custody.

Under a blazing afternoon sun, the Rev. Lisa Weah, pastor of the New Bethlehem Baptist Church in Gray’s neighborhood, said the message of equal justice for all must not be lost.

“Our prayer is that Baltimore will be the model for the rest of the nation,” she said.

The Rev. Jamal Bryant, a fiery leader of the protests, drew deafening applause when he praised Toya Graham, the woman who yanked her son from a crowd of rioters.

Bryant also blasted President Barack Obama and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for calling the rioters and looters “thugs.

“A year from now, the same children you call thugs will be registered to vote,” Bryant thundered.

___

3 p.m.

Baltimore residents expressed pleasure Sunday that officials were lifting the curfew in place since Tuesday, a day after rioting and looting broke out over the death of Freddie Gray.

Chanell Banks says many people wanted to go out to bars and restaurants on Saturday night to watch the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight, but couldn’t because of the curfew.

“You don’t realize how much you enjoy your freedom until somebody tells you you can’t do something,” she said.

Oronde Short also was glad the curfew would be ending. “I think it’s great because this way the citizens of Baltimore can get on with their normal lives,” he said.

Gray, a black man, died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. Six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

___

2:40 p.m.

Gov. Larry Hogan says the Maryland National Guard has begun demobilizing the 3,000 troops brought into Baltimore after rioting last week. He says that process will take about three days.

Hogan said Sunday that the state of emergency won’t be lifted until the last of the national guard has left. He says he and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake spoke and they agree it’s time to get the community back to normal. He says lifting the curfew is a good idea.

“It’s been a really rough week,” Hogan said. “But let’s get back to normal in the city and get people back to work and back to school and get people coming back into the city to visit the shops that were really devastated this week.”

Hogan says the city lost 200 businesses to rioting. He says many were minority-owned and some of those businesses did not have insurance.

Hogan spoke after attending church with his wife in west Baltimore on Sunday, a day when he was calling for unity and reconciliation.

Violence erupted after last Monday’s funeral for Freddie Gray, a black man who died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. Six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

___

1 p.m.

During a mass attended by Gov. Larry Hogan on Sunday at St. Peter Claver church in west Baltimore, Archbishop William Lori told parishioners that Freddie Gray’s death exposed long-standing issues such as failing schools, insecure family situations and mistrust between communities and civic officials.

“We must acknowledge the right of people who see no way out to make their voices heard and to lift up their frustration and anger publicly,” Lori said. “Yet to do so in a way that does not create more injustice and more destruction.”

Violence followed last Monday’s funeral for Freddie Gray, a black man who died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. Six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

___

12:30 p.m.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake sees the reopening of a west Baltimore mall looted during riots nearly a week ago as a reason for hope.

At a news conference outside Mondawmin Mall on Sunday afternoon, Rawlings-Blake said seeing the mall bounce back so quickly makes her optimistic.

“Right now I’m very confident. What we saw over the last few days, is not just the resiliency of our city, but also our communities coming together. We want to heal our city,” she said. “We know we have challenges in Baltimore. We know there’s work to be done.”

The mayor says the national guard will unwind its operations over the coming week.

Violence followed hours after last Monday’s funeral for Freddie Gray, a black man who died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. Six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

___

11 a.m.

Baltimore’s mayor has lifted a citywide curfew six days after the death of Freddie Gray sparked riots in the city.

The order for residents to stay home after 10 p.m. had been in place since Tuesday, and officials had planned to keep it in place through Sunday. Protests since Monday’s riots have been peaceful, and the announcement of charges against six officers involved in Gray’s arrest eased tensions.

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement Sunday morning that her goal was not to maintain the curfew any longer than was necessary.

Gray died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. The six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

___

10 a.m.

The lawyer for Freddie Gray’s family says there would be no need to move any trial out of Baltimore in the case of six police officers charged in the death of a black man in police custody.

Lawyer Billy Murphy said those who want to move such a proceeding from the majority-black city must prove that the officers couldn’t get a fair trial in Baltimore.

“There are people who don’t want it in Baltimore, because they see everything through a racial lens,” Murphy told “Fox News Sunday.” ”There’s no reason to move it out of Baltimore.”

Gray died after suffering a severe spinal injury while in police custody. The six officers face charges ranging from manslaughter to second-degree murder.

Charges against the six officers must be proved before a jury of 12 people, Murphy said, adding the officers will have ample opportunity to defend themselves.

“We can do this is in Baltimore just like it’s been done all over the country,” he said.

TIME Environment

Magnitude-3.9 Quake Shakes Buildings Across Los Angeles

The Los Angeles city skyline stands in front of the snow covered San Gabriel Mountains after a snowstorm hit the region
Mark Ralston—AFP/Getty Images The Los Angeles city skyline stands in front of the snow covered San Gabriel Mountains after a snowstorm hit the region on December 31, 2014.

Centered just north of Inglewood and Culver City

(LOS ANGELES) — A small earthquake has rattled the greater Los Angeles area, shaking buildings and waking residents. There were no immediate reports of injuries or damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey says an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 3.9 hit at 4:07 a.m. Sunday. It was centered a mile northwest of the View Park-Windsor Hills neighborhood, just north of the cities of Inglewood and Culver City.

It was the second earthquake in less than a month along the Newport-Inglewood fault. A magnitude-3.5 quake hit the same area on April 12.

The Los Angeles Fire Department said early Sunday that it briefly went into “earthquake mode.” The alert was lifted after its helicopters surveyed more than 470 square miles in the area and all 106 fire stations conducted safety checks.

TIME Crime

How the Feds Went Soft on Baltimore

Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts MARSHALL PROJECT
Alex Brandon—AP Baltimore Police Department Commissioner Anthony Batts surveys the corner of North and Pennsylvania avenues during protests in the city on April 30, 2015.

The city's involvement in a Justice Department program shows the softer side of intervention

This story was written by Simone Weichselbaum for The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization that covers the U.S. criminal justice system. Sign up for their newsletter, or follow The Marshall Project on Facebook or Twitter.

Six months before Baltimore exploded in anger at the city’s police, Justice Department officials were already busy examining the record of brutality and misconduct that had plagued the force for years.

But unlike other cities that have come under investigation by the department’s Civil Rights Division after complaints of excessive force, Baltimore, found its way into a less-onerous and adversarial Justice program that emphasizes cooperative support for local law-enforcement agencies. In fact, Baltimore requested the intervention.

That Justice program, called the Collaborative Reform Initiative for Technical Assistance, was created in 2011 by the department’s Office of Community Oriented Police Services, or COPS. Compared to the avenging lawyers of the Civil Rights Division, the program’s consultants might be considered the good cops.

Where the Civil Rights Division is known for filing lawsuits in the federal courts to compel recalcitrant police agencies to stop discriminatory practices or the excessive use of force, the COPS plan offers expertise and training to help change-minded police departments implement new policies on their own.

“There are 18,000 police departments in this country, and the idea that we can sue our way into reform, or put every police department under a consent decree, is just not viable,” the director of the COPS office, Ronald L. Davis, said in a telephone interview with The Marshall Project.

(On Friday, Baltimore’s chief prosecutor, Marilyn J. Mosby, announced she had filed criminal charges against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old African-American man who was arrested on April 12 for allegedly carrying a switchblade knife and died a week later from injuries he suffered while in custody.

The Baltimore police chief, Anthony W. Batts, had known Davis for years when he telephoned him last fall to ask for the COPS program’s help. The call came just days after the Baltimore Sun reported that the city had paid out $5.7 million in court judgments and settlements to resolve more than 100 police misconduct lawsuits since 2011.

Before taking over the Baltimore department in 2012, Batts had been the police chief in Oakland, Calif. At the time, Davis – a 19-year veteran of the Oakland force – was leading the police department in East Palo Alto, a small city 31 miles across the San Francisco Bay.

Davis said he had only a professional relationship with Batts, but knew his work as a chief in Baltimore, Oakland and Long Beach, Calif. Davis also emphasized that while the Collaborative Reform program necessarily gives priority to police agencies that are eager to change, it does not offer them an end-run around the Civil Rights Division.

In Baltimore’s case, Davis said, he consulted with officials of the division’s Special Litigation section to make sure they had not begun a preliminary investigation into a “pattern or practice” of discriminatory policing there. He added that the Civil Rights Division can also step in later, if a police force fails to make good on its promises to make changes in the collaborative program.

“The COPS office is not an investigatory body,” he said. “If we don’t see the same earnest effort that you committed to, we will cease and desist our program and turn everything we have over to Civil Rights.”

Batts and the Baltimore mayor, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, announced within days of the Sun article that they, too, had sought the Justice Department’s intervention, and they issued a 41-page reform plan that they described as a set of parameters for change. The steps in that plan included increasing accountability for rogue officers, tracking misconduct more closely, and possibly providing body cameras to record officers’ actions.

But some local officials remained unconvinced. The City Council president, Bernard C. “Jack” Young, had written to then-Attorney General Eric Holder on Oct. 1 requesting “a full review of the Baltimore City Police Department’s policies, procedures and practices.” Lester Davis, a spokesman for Young, said the councilman had specifically sought the involvement of the Civil Rights Division and would submit a new request to Holder’s successor, Loretta Lynch.

Officials of the Civil Rights Division said in recent interviews with The Marshall Project that while they have stepped up their enforcement efforts in recent years, they continue to struggle with the limitations of a Special Litigation staff of only about 50 attorneys, some of whom work on issues other than police accountability.

“Would the Civil Rights Division and the country benefit from having more people to focus in on these issues? Absolutely,” the acting assistant attorney general who heads the division, Vanita Gupta, said in an interview. “I would be an idiot to say that I don’t want more people.”

The Collaborate Reform Initiative represents what is effectively a second track on which the Justice Department can push for change with local law-enforcement agencies. But — particularly in cases like that of Baltimore, in which a force might be looking for some relief from public criticism — it requires careful vetting, current and former department officials said.

“The COPS program doesn’t have any enforcement authority,” noted William Yeomans, a former Civil Rights Division official. “So the department has to conclude that here is a police department that can take voluntary measures to improve itself. You have to have confidence in the leadership of the police department.”

Another former Justice Department official, Robert Driscoll, who served in the George W. Bush administration, said he was suspicious of how the Obama administration had decided on the less-invasive option for Baltimore, a city governed by Democrats.

“That is a nice way out of a difficult problem, when people say, `What are you going to do in response to the Baltimore Sun article?’” he said. “The difficulty of the way this is being handled is figuring out who gets the COPS approach and who gets a full-blown (Civil Rights Division) investigation.”

Baltimore is one of eight cities that have been or are being “assessed” – not investigated – by the Collaborative Reform Initiative. In Las Vegas and Philadelphia, teams of federally funded consultants have recommended dozens of reforms in such areas as use of force guidelines, internal investigations, firearms training and the recording of witnesses to shootings by the police.

“It is really an alternative,” a Justice spokesman, Kevin Lewis, said. “Before it gets to a place that it is so escalated that you need a pattern and practice (lawsuit), what the Department of Justice is doing is providing an option.”

But the department’s softer side is not always welcomed, either.

After a series of police shootings in Las Vegas, the ACLU of Nevada requested an investigation by the Civil Rights Division. When the Justice Department decided it would use the COPS program instead, ACLU lawyers wrote to the Justice Department expressing dismay. “We were very apprehensive,” said Tod Story, ACLU of Nevada’s executive director. “We thought what was happening here was worthy of a full-scale civil rights investigation.”

Ronald Davis, the COPS director, said he had no illusions about the extent of the challenges that police reformers faced in Baltimore.

“The powder keg that exploded in Baltimore has been simmering for generations,” he said. “And the idea that us starting an assessment in October somehow would have stopped that – I think I would disagree with.”

TIME People

Silicon Valley CEO David Goldberg Mourned by Friends and Colleagues

Mark Zuckerberg, Arianna Huffington and others have posted on social media about the beloved CEO

People are taking to social media to express their shock and condolences over the sudden death of David Goldberg, SurveyMonkey CEO and husband of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg posted on the social networking site, saying Goldberg “was an amazing person and I’m glad I got to know him.”

Arianna Huffington said she was “blessed to get to know him through his beloved wife Sheryl and to see firsthand what an amazing father, son, innovator, and caring friend he was.”

Others tweeted their remembrances as well:

And many more are putting their thoughts and photos on Goldberg’s Facebook page, which is what his brother Robert requested when he confirmed news of Goldberg’s death.

TIME weather

Small Earthquake Shakes Michigan

Earthquakes are rare in the state

A small earthquake hit Michigan on Saturday.

The U.S. Geological Service reported the quake on its website at a magnitude of 4.2, centered in Galesburg in the southwestern part of the state.

“While on the low end of the scale, it is still quite rare for Michigan,” Rob Dale, from the Ingham County Sheriff’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, told the Detroit Free Press.

No injuries were immediately reported, but the effects of the small quake were felt miles away, including as far as Chicago.

TIME People

Silicon Valley CEO David Goldberg, Husband of Sheryl Sandberg, Dies Suddenly

He is survived by his wife, Sheryl Sandberg, and their two children

David Goldberg, Silicon Valley CEO and husband of Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, died suddenly Friday night.

The 47-year-old CEO of SurveyMonkey died of undetermined causes, according to reports. Goldberg’s brother, Robert Goldberg, shared the news on Facebook.

“It’s with incredible shock and sadness that I’m letting our friends and family know that my amazing brother, Dave Goldberg, beloved husband of Sheryl Sandberg, father of two wonderful children, and son of Paula Goldberg, passed away suddenly last night,” Robert Goldberg wrote Saturday afternoon.

The post details how the family would like fans and friends of Goldberg to honor him: “In lieu of donations, we want to celebrate his life in a manner that respects the family’s privacy as they cope with this tragic, life changing event: Sheryl, their children, and our family would be grateful if people would post their memories and pictures of Dave to his Facebook profile.”

TIME Sports

See the Best Hats From the Kentucky Derby

People turned out in style to watch the Kentucky Derby in Louisville, Ky.

TIME Maryland

‘Victory Rally’ Fills Baltimore’s Streets

People gather at city hall in Baltimore
Eric Thayer—Reuters People gather at city hall in Baltimore, on May 2, 2015.

The rally comes after six officers were charged in Freddie Gray's death

(BALTIMORE)—Chants of “no justice, no peace, no racist police” echoed through the streets of Baltimore Saturday during a march that organizers billed as a “victory rally” a day after a prosecutor charged six officers involved in the arrest of a man who died in police custody.

State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby on Friday charged the six with felonies ranging from assault to murder in the death of Freddie Gray. He died from spinal injuries a week after his April 12 arrest. It provoked riots on the streets of West Baltimore and quickly became a rallying cry against police brutality and social inequality in the city and elsewhere.

The planned march was to be a mass protest of Gray’s d treatment by police, but after Mosby’s announcement, the tone had changed to more celebratory.

Shortly after noon at Gilmor Homes, a group of demonstrators, both black and white, young and older, congregated.

“Are you ready to march for justice?” Kwame Rose, 20, of Baltimore, said. The crowded chanted, “Yes.”

“Are you all ready to march for peace?” Rose asked. “Yeah,” the group answered.

Black Lawyers for Justice was expecting at least 10,000 people to show up downtown. Smaller groups of what looked to be several hundred gathered all around Baltimore and made their way through the streets to join the thousands at the main rally at City Hall.

They carried homemade signs, calling for peace, as well as printed ones asking for justice. Others wore T-shirts that read, “Black Lives Matter.”

Rashid Wiggins of Upton was selling $10 shirts with the slogan, with “I matter” in red.

He said it surprised him that charges were filed quickly and that he hopes it sends a message to other officers to ensure that when someone in police custody asks for medical help, they get it.

“I just want them to be a little more careful,” he said.

Near a CVS store that was looted and burned earlier in the week, groups of policemen stood on corners and a police helicopter flew overhead. Some officers twirled wooden batons idly. Someone had used chalk to draw a peace sign and write “Freddie Gray” on the brick face of the store. Hearts and dollar signs had been drawn on the store’s boarded up windows.

Chrystal Miller, 47, and Linda Moore, 63, were joining the rally. Moore brought a sign that said “The Dream Still Lives,” a reference to the Rev. Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” civil rights speech.

Miller, who was pushing her 1-year-old son in a stroller, said she hoped the march would be peaceful. And Moore said she believed it would be because of the charges.

Still, Miller said the story isn’t over.

“It’s going to be a long road,” she said, adding that the officers still need to go to court and she wasn’t sure they’d wind up with jail time as she hoped. “Nothing is going to happen overnight.”

Mosby said that after reviewing the results of a police investigation turned over to her just one day before, she had concluded Gray’s arrest was illegal and unjustified. She said his neck was broken because he was handcuffed, shackled and placed head-first into a police van, where his pleas for medical attention were repeatedly ignored as he bounced around inside a small metal compartment in the vehicle.

The officers missed five opportunities to help the injured and falsely imprisoned detainee before he arrived at the police station no longer breathing, Mosby said.

The police had no reason to stop or chase after Gray, she said. They falsely accused him of having an illegal switchblade when it was a legal pocketknife, and failed to strap him down with a seat belt, a direct violation of department policy, she said.

The six officers were scheduled to appear publicly in court for the first time at the end of the month. A lawyer hired by the police union insisted the officers did nothing wrong. Michael Davey said Mosby has committed “an egregious rush to judgment.”

Others saw Gray’s arrest and death as a reflection of Baltimore’s broad social and economic problems and the announcement of charges prompted celebrations in the streets Friday.

Walter Dorsett and Kasey Lee, both 18 of North East, Maryland, joined the crowd outside City Hall Saturday. Dorsett carried a sign that read, “Having a badge should not exclude you from the law.”

Dorsett said the charges seemed accurate, though, “it doesn’t mean they’re going to be found guilty, but it’s a start.”

Gray’s stepfather, Robert Shipley, said the family charges were “an important first step” and reiterated a plea to keep all public demonstrations peaceful.

“If you are not coming in peace, please don’t come at all,” he said.

The family lawyer, Billy Murphy, said Baltimore now has an opportunity to set an example for cities across the nation grappling with police brutality.

“The people of Philadelphia, New York, Cincinnati, and in numerous cities and towns are expressing their outrage that there are too many Freddie Grays,” Murphy said. “If Freddie Gray is not to die in vain, we must seize this opportunity to reform police departments throughout this country.”

 

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