TIME Innovation

Why Some District Attorneys Are Trying to Prove Themselves Wrong

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

These are today's best ideas

1. Some district attorneys have dedicated units working to prove them wrong.

By Nicole Porette with Dean Meminger in the Crime Report

2. Find out why the U.S. unskilled labor visa program is like a new American slavery.

By Jessica Garrison, Ken Bensinger and Jeremy Singer-Vine in BuzzFeed

3. For Turkey, the fight against ISIS upends a fragile peace with the Kurds.

By Kaya Genç in Pacific Standard

4. The next billion entrepreneurs will be women.

By Carol Leaman in the Next Web

5. What is your attention really worth?

By Manoush Zomorodi in Note to Self from WNYC

The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C.

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME Military

2 Women Have Made it to the Final Phase of Ranger School

Women Rangers In Training On The Mountain Course
Dan Lamothe—The Washington Post/Getty Images Ranger students, including one of the first women ever to take the Ranger School course, wait to ascend Mount Yonah in northern Georgias on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 as part of the school's Mountain Phase.

They begin the last stage on Sunday

Two women have passed the challenging Mountain Phase of the U.S. Army’s elite Ranger School and will now advance to the third and final phase in the swamps of Florida—giving them the chance to become the first women ever to graduate from the rigorous program.

The class began with 19 women, but only three remain: the two who advanced to phase three and one woman who was “recycled”—she, along with 60 men, can try the Mountain Phase again. The two women going on to the final phase are joined by 125 men, the Washington Post reports. Phase three begins on Sunday, when the Ranger students will parachute into Pensacola, Fla. If any of the women pass, they will be able to wear the Army’s Ranger Tab, but will not serve with the 75th Ranger Regiment alongside many of their fellow graduates.

The class is part of the Army’s initiative to integrate women into combat positions; it has until 2016 to open all jobs to female soldiers, or give proof that certain positions cannot be filled by women.

[Washington Post]

TIME women

How Indian Women Are Reclaiming Their Right to Public Space in Delhi

A flash mob performs during a candlelit vigil protesting violence against women as they mark the second anniversary of the deadly gang rape occurred in New Delhi on Dec. 16, 2014.
Saurabh Das—AP A flash mob performs during a candlelit vigil protesting violence against women as they mark the second anniversary of the deadly gang rape occurred in New Delhi on Dec. 16, 2014.

Women are stretching the existing boundaries of cultural rules that attempt to demarcate a woman’s place in an unequal city

Urban redevelopment in India over recent decades has had particular implications for women. While the economic deregulation of the 1990s opened up new possibilities for work, leisure and relationships, it has also led to new stresses. Cities such as New Delhi have become sites for experimentation, autonomy and aspiration for women. Yet against these images of emancipation can be juxtaposed everyday risks and vulnerabilities.

Contradictions abound in a space that values the woman’s body as a liberalized commodity. Women are under constant scrutiny: for what they wear, how they behave, where they are going, who they are with, at what time of day or night. They are under pressure to conform to familiar boundaries of tradition and class. Challenging these boundaries carries the risk of psycho-social dissonance and assault of various kinds.

Perhaps it is no coincidence that the increasing number of women working in the IT industry – or socializing in bars and restaurants – arose in tandem with the rise of cultural nationalist politics in India. Following the rape and murder of young student Jyoti Singh in New Delhi in December 2012, some held that responsibility for violence against women should be attributed to “western lifestyles”. Public debates have also focused on other forms of the “outsider” as a source of fear and hostility on Delhi’s streets, naming rural migrants a “menace in society”.

Bearer of tradition

Clearly, violence against women in Delhi is not a new phenomenon that has arisen out of economic liberalization and urban redevelopment. Yet the intense focus on the death of Jyoti Singh and subsequent cases is indicative of a cultural shift. This young woman, from a provincial background but “aspirational”, represented what “world class” Delhi was supposed to afford women: safe access to public space and a cosmopolitan lifestyle.

Such attacks highlight the contradictions held within the body of the woman. She must embody the progressive city but also remain the bearer of tradition measured by skirt lengths. The presence of young professional women in Delhi’s public spaces may be desirable to legitimate claims of “global city” status. However, in reality, this access is conditional and based on maintaining a cultural order inflected by a moral discourse of respectability.

As writers such as Shilpa Phadke argue, women must manufacture purpose in order to access the city, they cannot just “loiter”. Much of this purpose is non-sexualised conduct such as engaging in family activities or shopping in the new mega-malls.

Women navigate the city “giving back” through aggressive language, evading stares, reclaiming spaces such as rooftops and parks. They seek safety in numbers, knowing when to wrap a scarf more tightly around their head or cover their knees when sitting. These appear to be everyday skills to cope with the city and to manage its discomfort.

While in these actions women may appear fragile, they are in fact asserting a place in Delhi, especially when reassured by anonymity or the protection afforded by socio-economic capacity such as owning a car. This is an understanding of Delhi opposed to the computer-generated images of independent, happy women in new condominiums that look down from advertising hoardings throughout the city.

Clearly, women are not necessarily timid or immobile in the face of Delhi’s aggression. They are taking part in producing space and seeking out pleasure. There are limits, but these limits can be stretched. Roaming may be curtailed for some who have to remain in the line of sight of home, and choices restricted at times by the pressures of respectability. Yet, women have the capacity to generate ambiguity through their presence, disrupting cultural rules that attempt to demarcate a woman’s place in an unequal city.

This article originally appeared on The ConversationThe Conversation

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME health

The Benefits of Spending Time Alone, According to Science

woman-drinking-coffee
Getty Images

When you're on your own, you're open to the world and new people in it

I’ve been in two long-term relationships (my first lasted seven years, and I’ve been with my current partner for five), and frankly the time in between, when I was single, was easier for me. So now that I’m paired up again, it’s no surprise that I love doing things on my own. I relish a quiet solo coffee stop or book-browsing session, I love going to the movies by myself, and I also regularly travel on my own as well.

So you might be thinking, who is this woman who already likes to spend time on her own, to give advice to people who are uncomfortable spending time solo? It’s because, at this point, I’m expert at it. I feel absolutely no discomfort sitting by myself at a meal, sidling up to a bar almost anywhere for a beer (even if I’m the only woman), or heading off alone into the woods for a hike. And I think it matters in modern times, when we are growing up in smaller families, marrying later and traveling for work on our own.

Many people are discovering the joys of spending time alone; in this day and age, most of us will experience it, and possibly for long stretches. If solo time is seen as simply a time to “get through” while you’re waiting for a spouse, children or friends to show up, you’re wasting years of your life.

Just recently, in fact, I had the best meal I’ve had all month by myself at Tadich’s Grill in San Francisco. I was walking by, and I spotted a menu that looked like one Don Draper would order from in an early “Mad Men” episode, so I went in and took a seat at the long wooden counter. I drank a perfectly made vodka martini and had the best steamed artichoke I’ve had since my grandma used to make them. I was the only single woman at the counter, which is usually the case. In fact, I always wonder what all the other women on their own are doing while the guys are out, enjoying themselves solo. Are they sitting at home, eating a peanut butter sandwich? What a bummer.

I’m not saying that there aren’t men who feel uncomfortable doing things solo, but it does seem to be more common among women.

Regardless of your gender, if you are uncomfortable eating alone, you are missing out. Why? Because eating alone can even be more enjoyable than a meal with others. You get to order precisely what you like, and you can actually focus on what you’re eating, not your dining companion. There’s also the spontaneity of seeing some place you’d like to try and just going in and seeing if you like it. Last night, for example, I found a new favorite restaurant. (Yes, Tadich’s was that fantastic.)

But don’t take my word for it — there are scientists who study what people think they will experience when they do something alone in public, and then what they actually experience.

“People decide to not do things all the time just because they’re alone,” Rebecca Ratner, a professor of marketing at the Robert H. Smith School of Business, told the Washington Post. Hall has spent the last few years studying how and when people choose to be alone. “But the thing is, they would probably be happier going out and doing something.”

An article in the August Journal of Consumer Research by Ratner and her colleague Rebecca Hamilton covers five studies on the subject of solo activities. Jesse Singal at New York magazine got an early preview of the article. There, the researchers write: “[C]onsumers worry that if they engage in [hedonic] activities alone, observers will infer that they could not find friends to accompany them,” as one of the reasons for not doing stuff independently. (Hedonic means non-utilitarian activities, so doing something you enjoy.)

But when they actually tested that theory out on college students by asking some in groups and some solo to check out a nearby art exhibit, their results found the same enjoyment for both. The researchers wrote that their findings “provide empirical support for a key premise of our investigation: consumers who forego hedonic activities alone are missing out on opportunities for rewarding experiences.”

As anyone who has traveled alone knows, it’s the best way to meet new people. Extrapolate that into your home environment, and it works too. You are in a bubble when you go out with a friend or a partner, but that bubble is broken when you’re on your own, and you’re open to the world and new people in it. You’d be surprised how fun that can be.

It’s simple: If you’re worried about what other people will think of your dining (or movie-going, or concert-attending) alone, you’re having less fun and meeting fewer new people, which is the opposite of what you’d expect, right? So get out there — try a solo meal or other outing. If you must, bring a book or magazine the first few times so you have something to do, but try just sitting on your own through part of a meal not reading. Look around. Taste your food. Enjoy watching other people or thinking about a thorny problem (or remembering a pleasant time in your past). Research says you’ll enjoy yourself.

This article originally appeared on MNN.com

More from MNN.com:

TIME Ideas hosts the world's leading voices, providing commentary and expertise on the most compelling events in news, society, and culture. We welcome outside contributions. To submit a piece, email ideas@time.com.

TIME politics

This Is How Politically Inferior Women Were After the American Revolution

Abigail Adams
MPI—Getty Images circa 1775: Abigail Smith Adams (1744 - 1818), from a painting by C Schessele

When an American woman married a foreign man, she lost her American citizenship altogether

History News Network

This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN.

Hillary Rodham Clinton might become president just a few years short of the hundredth anniversary of the nineteenth amendment, which gave American women the right to vote. But it will have been more than twice that long since this nation in its founding years missed the opportunity to include women in its governance. Images of early twentieth-century suffragists marching for the vote in their long skirts and beflowered hats can give the impression that women’s political power gradually grew from the distant past through today, but American history has not been a constant march toward broader political rights. Although we might finally have a first female president in 2017, by 1776 three women had actually ruled over the British colonies of North America: Queen Elizabeth I, for whom the Virginia colony of Roanoke was named; Queen Anne, who ruled England from 1702 to 1714; and her sister Mary II, who ruled alongside her husband. Yet the founders of the United States created an independent republic that decreased women’s political participation and delayed their inclusion in the governing of this nation.

Of course European and colonial American women did not have equal political rights with men. The fact that the new country had founding fathers reflects women’s political subordination. Regarding legal rights, Britain’s system of coverture meant that married women had no legal identity of their own. As dependents of their husbands, they could not own property or businesses, serve on juries, write contracts, sue, or be sued. (The British and American custom of a wife taking her husband’s last name represented women’s loss of legal identity within marriage.)

Yet colonial women’s inequality to men was part of a complicated hierarchy. Women were dependent on their fathers or husbands, but everyone but the monarch was dependent on someone. Most men did not have voting rights. Common people’s political rights often lay in street protests, and women were part of the crowd. Widows were not subject to coverture and could own property and run businesses.

The founders of the American republic dramatically changed American political life, but they decided not to advance women’s political or legal rights. Women played a vital role in the protests and the war against the British empire. Women were in the crowds protesting the Stamp Act. Because women were in charge of most household consumption, the Revolution depended on their enthusiastic support of boycotts against British goods. Philadelphian Esther de Berdt Reed raised thousands of dollars to support the Continental Army. Countless women contributed and solicited money, sewed shirts for soldiers (each embroidered with the name of the woman who made it), prepared food, and made bullets. Both the Continental Army and the British Army enlisted women as cooks and laundresses. Other women unofficially accompanied the army to stay with their family members, protect themselves from invading armies, and take advantage of the economic opportunities a large army provided. Countless women managed farms and business when their husbands went to war. Not all critical contributions to the founding of a nation take place in a convention hall or on a battlefield.

Some women urged that the United States include women as it expanded political rights. Judith Sargent Murrayargued in the Massachusetts Magazinethat women, too, had the right to self-govern that the Enlightenment declared for men. It made no sense to assume that nature had “yielded to one half of the human species so unquestionable a mental superiority.” The new country should ensure that “independence should be placed within their grasp” as well. In her valedictory address to the Philadelphia Academy in 1793, graduate Priscilla Mason argued that men “denied us the means of knowledge, and then reproached us for the want of it. . . . They doomed the sex to servile or frivolous employments, on purpose to degrade [our] minds, that they themselves might hold unrivalled, the power and preeminence they had usurped.” She hoped that her generation of women would gain access to the professions, including government.

Instead, Congress left coverture in place and let the states decide voting regulations. All of the states eventually explicitly defined voting citizens as male and white. New Jersey’s state constitution initially granted the vote to “all inhabitants” who were adult property-owners, so some white and black propertied widows (as well as some black men) voted in the state’s early years. Female property-owners’ participation was uncontroversial enough that New Jersey’s 1790 election law explicitly referred to the voter as “he or she.” But as elections became more hotly contested in the early nineteenth century, the political parties accused each other of taking advantage of women or even dressing men as women in order to commit voter fraud. In 1807, New Jersey joined the other states with a new state constitution that restricted the vote to free, white, adult male property owners. Some districts in some states allowed women to vote in school board elections, figuring they had particular expertise and concern over children’s education. But generally, as the states dropped the requirement for property ownership to vote or hold office, they increasingly defined political participation as the purview of only white men. Coverture remained the law. When an American woman married a foreign man, she lost her American citizenship altogether.

When regions that had not been British colonies became states in the union, women there lost ground. The colonies of other empires, including France and Spain, had not had coverture, so women had legal rights and usually greater economic opportunities. In most American Indian nations, women owned the farmland, but many of them also fell under coverture as the United States expanded west.

Hillary Clinton’s career is an important milestone in the history of formal female participation in government, but women have been crucial to the founding and the development of the nation since its beginning, despite their lack of recognition.

Kathleen DuVal teaches Early American history and American Indian history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her latest book is Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution (2015).

TIME Etsy

A Huge Percentage Of Etsy Sellers Are Women

Inside Etsy Inc.'s DUMBO Headquarters Following Company's IPO
Bloomberg—Bloomberg via Getty Images Employees arrive at Etsy Inc. headquarters in Brooklyn.

But just one-third of U.S. businesses are run by women.

Take a look through the names of Etsy store owners online and you’ll notice something cool: They’re nearly all run by women. In fact, 86% of Etsy businesses have female owners, according to a report released by the company.

Meanwhile, just one-third of businesses in the U.S. are run by women, according to the Los Angeles Times. Brooklyn-based Etsy reported that 56% of sellers have a college degree and have an average household income of $56,180.

The median age of the sellers is 39 and over a third are less than 35-years-old.

“When you think of an entrepreneur, who do you picture?” asks Althea Erickson, Etsy’s global policy director, in a blog post announcing the report. “I don’t immediately picture my neighbor, who sews baby quilts at her kitchen table on evenings and weekends, and drops off packages at the post office during her lunch break. Yet that last image is very much the picture of an Etsy entrepreneur.”

“They’re the kind of people that got a lot of compliments on their items and people said, ‘You should sell it,'” said Sucharita Mulpuru, a Forrester Research analyst, to the newspaper. “Etsy provided them a platform for doing so.”

Per Etsy:

76% of Etsy sellers consider their shops to be businesses, and 30% focus on their creative businesses as their sole occupation. This business mindset is also reflected in Etsy sellers’ aspirations—90% wish to grow their sales in the future.

The Etsy report surveyed 4,000 sellers from November 2014 to January 2015. The company says that there are 1.4 million active Etsy sellers around the world.

TIME Food & Drink

Yoga-Pants Maker Lululemon Is Introducing a Beer

Curiosity Lager launches on August 15 in Vancouver

Would you like a lager with your downward dog?

Lululemon—that company of see-through yoga pant infamy that arguably singlehandedly launched the “atheleisure” trend in comfortable, everyday sportswear—is introducing a specialty beer, the Curiosity Lager.

The beer comes in a 500 ml slender can, has 4.6% alcohol, printed with a geometric array of Pacific Northwest motifs: a totem pole, a suspension bridge, evergreen trees, mountains, and water. A limited edition release of 88,000 cans is planned.

Lululemon teamed up with Stanley Park Brewing to launch the lager, flavored with chinook and lemon drop hops for “crisp, cold beer.”

The beer’s August 15 release is timed with the SeaWheeze Half Marathon and Sunset Festival, a popular race in Lululemon’s hometown of Vancouver, British Columbia.

Though seemingly an odd couple at first, beer and yoga have coupled to become a major lifestyle force in the past few years, with boozy sessions becoming increasingly popular, particularly among the prime yuppie female demographic.

But Curiosity Lager is only the latest strategic deviation for the company, which is attempting to make its way into the men’s market.

Doug Devlin, marketing director for Stanley Park Brewing, told the CBC, “I think Lululemon, by extension, is interested in talking to a more male beer-drinking crowd.”

TIME Media

Saudi TV Just Got a Lot More Feminist

Sponsored Women Saudi Show
Courtesy Rotana Network Sponsored Women

An edgy drama about four young women who move to America is a surprise hit over Ramadan

At first glance, the four stars of a new Saudi television drama, “Mubta’ethat” or “Sponsored Women,” look a little mis-matched. There’s Salma, a chic tomboy with short hair and red lipstick, Raghad, a glam-girl with confident strides and princess curls, Sara, a feisty hijabi with colorful clothing, and Alia, a cautious girl who wears a black niqab (covering of the hair and entire face, with only slits for the eyes). But they have one thing in common: They’ve each got a U.S. visa page in their green passport. It is their golden ticket to leave their homes in Saudi Arabia to pursue an education in Philadelphia.

The show highlights how these Saudi women fluidly adapt to a Western world while maintaining their Eastern ideals. They enroll in English classes, move into their own apartments and learn how to drive a car. They all steer their own lives for the first time.

The script plays with the obvious contrasts inherent in the plot–the girls are almost as different from each other as their culture is from the one they’ll encounter in the United States. It manages to also dig into stereotypes about America or women in veils.

During the 30 episodes, the women are forced to identify with each other and confront their own biases. Their friendship can be compared to that of a certain all-female cult HBO show from the 90s. The now classic formula of bringing together very different girls with strong personalities and courageous adventures still works. This time, with a Saudi accent.

The program debuted on June 17, the first day of Ramadan, and was broadcast in Saudi Arabia every night through the Holy month which ended in mid-July.

The show enjoyed a steady viewership over the course of the month. Each night, the episode would be uploaded on YouTube after it airs, and the comment section would quickly populate. “These girls don’t represent any Saudi girl I know and I’m a sponsored student,” reads a comment. “This is an amazing series, can’t wait for the next episode,” reads another. The positive reviews seem to outweigh the negative ones. Since it is broadcast during the Holy Month, this revolutionary show is representing millennials in a way that Saudi TV hasn’t otherwise seen.

The show has an impressive pedigree: Directed by Oscar-nominated Saudi superstar, Haifaa Al Mansour and written by her sister, Noura Al Mansour, it was produced by Rotana Khalejia, a company that is partially owned by Saudi Prince Al Waleed Bin Talal.

The characters are from key parts of Saudi and represent different lifestyles and social temperaments. Surely, young girls in Saudi can identify with qualities found in every one of these women.

Salma is from the liberal West Coast, Raghad is from the luxurious capital, Sara is from the moderate East Coast and Alia is originally from conservative Al Qassim.

Each family reacts differently to the departure of their daughter to the faraway continent. And while each girl has at least one family member closely watching over them in Philadelphia, letting go is still nerve wrecking for the families.

In one comical scene, Alia’s mother is seen stealthily stuffing stacks of (imported) ramen noodles and sacks of rice into her daughter’s luggage before departing from Saudi. “They have that food in America!” her frustrated husband protests. “No! It’s laced with drugs there!” the exasperated mother replies. They are nervous about sending their only child, a daughter, to the unknown.

“It smells like freedom! Of course, it tastes like nicotine,” Salma, says on the phone, as she cautiously drags a puff from a cigarette upon arrival to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Despite being a few continents away, she maintains the Saudi fear of being seen smoking in public.

Actress Noor Al Badr who plays Salma, is a doctor in real life. She got “the randomest call” from Al Mansour who asked her to join the cast. Five days later, Al Badr was on the plane to Bahrain, where they shot most of the show.

“Of course, most people thought I was crazy. I was a doctor! According to most people in our society, acting is not something to be proud of. I think I’m the first Saudi girl to smoke on TV. I wanted to break the taboo,” Al Badr said.

No Saudi feminist show would be complete without the subject of the hijab. The irony is not lost on the characters. Two of the characters don’t cover their hair and two do. In one scene, Salma says of Alia, “She can see everyone but nobody can see her.” Alia, played by actress Zara Albaloshi, repeats how her covering is the ultimate feminist statement. Perhaps most surprising of all, Alia falls in love with a non-Muslim American, Jason, who lives in her building. He becomes interested in Islam and converts. By the end of the series, Alia, the girl who only reveals her eyes to the world, gives her heart to Jason.

The show’s U.S. location is also telling: Philadelphia is central to the American Dream. It is where the Founding Fathers signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.

The women are in the U.S. on an academic scholarship, called the Saudi Scholarship. They are “sponsored,” hence the title of the show. Saudi Arabia has been funding Saudi students in the U.S. since 1960, but the late King Abdullah’s Scholarship Program, which launched a decade ago, was the largest push in encouraging female citizens to study abroad. In just five decades, Saudi girls went from not knowing how to read or write to a 97 percent literacy rate, according to UNICEF.

Although the image of Saudi women has changed over the generations, the outdated impressions haven’t yet caught up with reality. The show makes a point of addressing these issues.

“With 150,000 men and women studying abroad, why is Saudi considered to be a ‘developing country?’ In reality, it is quite developed,” Sara, played by actress Maram Abdulaziz, asks her classmates in one scene.

Actress Noura Assar’s character, Raghad, has her camera at the ready to document the trials and triumphs of her Saudi female friends. An aspiring actress and director, Raghad’s quiet rebellion comes in the form of selecting that area of study. There is no such industry in Saudi Arabia today.

Assar thinks the show is starting a different conversation. “I am proud to say that the image of Saudi women has come a long way from what it used to be; strong Saudi women always existed, however, the image was very much attached to a certain stereotype. The scholarships, I’d say, participated in this change due to the ‘face to face’ method of dealing with others, where people in other countries saw for themselves what these ladies can achieve and become,” she said.

Her co-star agrees.

“Just because we can’t drive doesn’t mean we can’t fly and reach for the stars. Hope the show will continue next Ramadan!” Al Badr said.

TIME mental health

Study Finds That Women Slip Into Dementia Faster Than Men

Senior woman covering face with her hands
Getty Images

The study has no medical implications quite yet

Women who develop slight memory deficits and mental decline slide faster toward dementia than men, according to a new study presented Tuesday at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Washington.

Researchers were quick to note that the study’s findings aren’t reflective of a difference in brain chemistry between genders and have no medical implications just yet. “All we can say at this point is that there appears to be a faster trajectory for women than men” in the direction of dementia, said P. Murali Doraiswamy, a professor of psychiatry at Duke University’s Institute for Brain Sciences and lead author of the study.

The study used cognitive test scores from 398 participants of both genders who were primarily in their 70s. After controlling for outside variables like education and genetics, the researchers found that women’s test scores fell by an average of two points per year, compared to just one point for men. This wasn’t the only negative effect for women: their standard of life—how they performed at home, work, and with family—also fell faster than men.

A vast majority—nearly two-thirds of the five million Americans afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease—are women, which scientists note can be traced to the fact that women live longer, but the reasons for their decline have remained indeterminate.

[New York Times]

 

TIME celebrities

Emma Thompson Says Acting World Has Become More Sexist

Emma Thompson
Jordan Strauss—Invision/AP Emma Thompson arrives at the 20th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at the Shrine Auditorium on Jan. 18, 2014, in Los Angeles.

“When I was younger, I really did think we were on our way to a better world," she says

Actress Emma Thompson says she’s “not impressed” by the way the acting industry treats women. In fact, she says, sexism in the acting industry has grown more prevalent as she’s gotten older.

“When I was younger, I really did think we were on our way to a better world and when I look at it now, it is in a worse state than I have known it, particularly for women and I find that very disturbing and sad,” she said in an interview with Radio Times magazine.

The actress, who plays a 77-year-old prostitute in the film The Legend of Barney Thomson, said there’s more pressure for women to look a certain way and take on certain roles than when she started out.

“I don’t think there’s any appreciable improvement and I think that for women, the question of how they are supposed to look is worse than it was even when I was young. So, no, I am not impressed at all.”

Read more at Radio Times.

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