TIME Wisconsin

Milwaukee Plane Crash Kills At Least 1

The pilot had asked to abort a landing just before the crash

At least one person is dead after a singe-engine passenger plane crashed in Milwaukee’s Lawrence J. Timmerman Airport on Wednesday, according to local news reports.

The plane burst into a fiery blaze after crashing onto the field.

The County Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed at least one person is dead, reports WITI.

The plane, registered to Trustey Management Corp. in Boston, had radioed in for a “go-around,” or a request to abort landing, just before catching fire. The aircraft was manufactured in 2009.

Details on how many passengers were onboard or the cause of fire remain unknown.

 

 

TIME Wisconsin

Man Mistakes Dog for a Lion and Shoots It

People had reported seeing a lion wandering the neighborhood

(MILWAUKEE) — A man who thought he spotted a lion that people have reported seeing wandering on Milwaukee’s north side, has shot and injured a large pit bull.

WITI-TV reports that the dog, which was shot Tuesday night, is being cared for at the Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission.

The organization’s director Karen Sparapani says people might be “amped up or afraid” by the reports of lion sightings. The pit bull suffered a fractured leg, but should be OK. It isn’t clear if the gunman will face charges.

Milwaukee police say they have investigated about two dozen calls of apparent lion sightings. No animal has been found. Police Chief Edward Flynn has said his officers were given cellphone video of an animal that appeared to be a “lion-ish creature.”

TIME Crime

Teen Horror Blogger Pleads Insanity in Parents’ Killing

Parents Killed Teen Accused
Oneida County Sheriff’s Office/AP Ashlee Martinson, 17, shown in this photo provided April 24, 2014

The 17-year-old is charged with two counts of first-degree intentional homicide

A Wisconsin teenager who is accused in the double murder of her mother and stepfather entered insanity pleas Monday.

Ashlee Martinson, 17, is charged with two counts of first-degree intentional homicide and three counts of false imprisonment in the fatal stabbing of 40-year-old Jennifer Ayers and the shooting death of 37-year-old Thomas Ayers. The horror blogger, who documented her dark obsession with death under the name Vampchick, is also accused of locking her three sisters, between the ages of 9 and 2, in a room before fleeing to Boone County, Indiana.

Martinson pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect during a brief appearance in Oneida County Circuit Court, WFXS reports. A hearing date is set for Sept. 28.

The March 8 killings at her family’s Rhinelander home allegedly occurred the same day the teen got into a heated argument with her stepfather over her relationship with her 22-year-old boyfriend. Police say Martinson shot her stepfather in the head first and then stabbed her mother to death. Police found a rifle in the kitchen and a bloody folding knife on the counter next to the bathroom sink, according to the Stevens Point Journal.

According to a search warrant filed in the case, police also looked at the teen’s blog and found one entry, titled “Unworthy,” which depicted a scene in a cabin in the woods where the main character had tied a person to a table. The character then tortures, mutilates and ultimately kills the victim, according to the warrant, the Stevens Point Journal reported.

Police say Martinson fled to Indiana after the murders and was captured the next day with her boyfriend, Ryan Sisco. Sisco, who was not involved in the killings, told police her parents advised him over Facebook to keep away from the teen because she was a minor, the paper reported.

This article first appeared on People.com

TIME States

Nebraska Has Ordered a State of Emergency Over Bird Flu

In this May 11, 2015 photo provided by John Gaps III, men in hazardous materials suits load dead poultry to be buried at Rose Acre Farms, Inc., just west of Winterset, Iowa.
John Gaps III—AP In this May 11, 2015 photo provided by John Gaps III, men in hazardous materials suits load dead poultry to be buried at Rose Acre Farms, Inc., just west of Winterset, Iowa.

Over 33 million birds in 16 states have now been affected by the pathogen

Governor Pete Ricketts ordered a state of emergency Thursday after Nebraska’s Department of Agriculture confirmed the highly contagious H5N2 avian flu virus had infected a second farm.

The declaration opens up emergency funding in the hopes it can help contain the pathogen that now threatens what is, according to local officials, a $1.1 billion poultry industry in Nebraska.

“While not a human health threat, the discovery of avian influenza is a serious situation for our poultry sector, and I want to provide responders with access to all appropriate tools to address it,” said Ricketts in a statement.

The proclamation follows similar actions taken in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Iowa. More than 33 million birds in 16 states have now been affected by the outbreak, which originated in a small backyard flock in Oregon.

The outbreak has hit Americans’ pocketbooks as, the Associated Press reports, the price of large eggs in the Midwest rose by 17% since mid-April and other price increases are being seen in turkey, boneless breast meat and mixing eggs.

TIME police

No Criminal Charges for Wisconsin Cop in Unarmed Teen’s Shooting Death

This combination made with file photos provided by the Madison, Wis. police department and Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Madison Police officer Matt Kenny, left, and Tony Robinson, a biracial man who was killed by the officer.
AP This combination made with file photos provided by the Madison, Wis. police department and Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Madison Police officer Matt Kenny, left, and Tony Robinson, a biracial man who was killed by the officer.

Tony Robinson, 19, was shot and killed on March 6

A Wisconsin police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager in March will not face criminal charges, the Dane County District Attorney announced Tuesday, marking the latest case of a police-involved killing to draw national attention.

In a lengthy and detailed explanation of his investigation into the shooting of 19-year-old Tony Robinson, District Attorney Ismael Ozanne told reporters he had determined that the use of deadly force by officer Matt Kenny, who is white, was lawful.

Following Tuesday afternoon’s announcement, Robinson’s mother, Andrea Irwin, told CNN her family “absolutely” plans to file a civil lawsuit against the police. “The things that have taken place since my son passed and the things that have been done to my family, to me, they’ve gone above and beyond to try to make sure they kick me when I’m down,” she said. “They have done a smear campaign against my child and against me since this all began.”

Kenny was responding to reports of a disturbance in Madison on March 6 that involved a man dodging through traffic and punching multiple people, Ozanne said. A friend of Robinson’s initially called 9-1-1 just before 6:30 p.m., concerned about Robinson’s erratic behavior. The friend said Robinson was “tweaking” after he took hallucinogenic mushrooms, the Wisconsin State Journal reports. Other emergency callers said a man fitting Robinson’s description had punched multiple pedestrians in the area.

When Kenny arrived on the scene minutes later, Robinson was in his friend’s apartment. According to Kenny’s account, Ozanne said, Robinson immediately punched Kenny in the face. Kenny then fatally shot Robinson seven times within three seconds, with all of the bullets striking the teen.

Robinson’s death sparked days of large protests within Madison. It was another death in a string of highly publicized killings of unarmed black men around the country that have become a cultural and political flashpoint since the shooting of Mike Brown in Ferguson, Mo., last August. This year, police officers involved in killings of black men in North Charleston, S.C., and Baltimore were dealt murder charges.

In the wake of recent riots tied to police killings of unarmed black men by white officers, Ozanne urged Madison residents to maintain peace following Tuesday’s announcement. As the first black district attorney in Wisconsin, he said he “understands the pain” of unjustified racial profiling. But he also said his decision was based on the facts that were presented to him, not emotion.

“My decision will not bring Tony Robinson Jr. back,” Ozanne said. “My decision will not end the racial disparities that exist in the justice system, in our justice system.”

Read next: These Two Stats Show the Big Problem With Policing in America

TIME Crime

Police Officer Who Fatally Shot Wisconsin Teen to Learn Fate Tuesday

In this Feb. 26, 2013 file photo, Dane County, Wisconsin, District Attorney Ismael Ozanne speaks in a Madison, Wis., court. Ozanne is weighing whether to file charges against Madison Officer Matt Kenny in Tony Robinson’s death.
Michael P. King—AP In this Feb. 26, 2013 file photo, Dane County, Wisconsin, District Attorney Ismael Ozanne speaks in a Madison, Wis., court. Ozanne is weighing whether to file charges against Madison Officer Matt Kenny in Tony Robinson’s death.

A medical examiner said Tony Robinson Jr. was shot in the head, torso and right arm

The white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed biracial man in Madison, Wis., on March 6, sparking protests against perceived police brutality and institutional racism, will learn Tuesday whether he will face charges over the death, Wisconsin county prosecutor Ismael Ozanne said Sunday.

Officer Matt Kenny, 45, was responding to reports that a man suspected of assaulting two people was weaving through traffic on foot, reports Reuters. Investigators say 19-year-old Tony Robinson Jr. was shot in his apartment after he attacked Kenny but no other details have been released.

A county medical examiner says Robinson was shot in the head, torso and right arm.

The incident motivated peaceful demonstrations in Madison organized by the Young, Gifted and Black Coalition. They have called for Kenny to be fired and charged with homicide.

A number of racially charged episodes involving the police and the black community has put the debate about perceived institutional racism at the forefront of America’s national conversation.

Last month in South Carolina, officer Michael Slager was charged with homicide for shooting Walter Scott as he was running away. On May 2, Baltimore Police Officer Caesar Goodson was charged with second-degree murder for the death of Freddie Gray. Five other officers involved in that arrest, which resulted Gray’s death from a severe neck and spine injury, are facing various other charges.

[Reuters]

TIME Crime

Driver Shot and Killed After a Car Accident Leaves a 2-Year-Old Dead

A 15-year-old was also injured during the shooting

A Milwaukee man was shot to death Sunday evening after he hit and killed a 2-year-old child who had run into the street.

In a statement, Police Captain Timothy Heier said a 15-year-old was also injured in the shooting, which occurred at 5:10 p.m., according to the Associated Press.

The driver, 41, was at the scene of the accident when the shooting occurred. The man was pronounced dead at the scene and the 15-year-old was taken to the hospital to treat injuries.

It is unclear if the teenager was a passenger in the car.

TIME College Basketball

A Wisconsin-Duke Final Is Just Fine

Quinn Cook #2, Jahlil Okafor #15 and Justise Winslow #12 of the Duke Blue Devils acknowledge fans while walking off the court following their 81-61 win against the Michigan State Spartans during the NCAA Men's Final Four Semifinal at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 4, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Lance King—Getty Images Quinn Cook #2, Jahlil Okafor #15 and Justise Winslow #12 of the Duke Blue Devils acknowledge fans while walking off the court following their 81-61 win against the Michigan State Spartans during the NCAA Men's Final Four Semifinal at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 4, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Without undefeated Kentucky, this year's title game won't be historic. But it's still loaded with intrigue

At the start of the 2014-15 college basketball season, 351 Division I teams had a chance to win the national championship. Going into this weekend, four teams remained: undefeated Kentucky and Wisconsin on one side of the bracket, Duke and Michigan State on the other. Let’s face it: Duke-Kentucky would have been a dandy final. Both programs have a national imprint. Dynastic Duke is the New York Yankees, or Dallas Cowboys, of college hoops. Kentucky is not only a blue blood program, but more recently it’s a factory of future NBA talent led by a divisive coach, master salesman John Calipari. The NCAA had already nullified two Final Four appearances of his prior teams, UMass and Memphis.

Imagine Calipari’s Cats just needing to get by the venerable Coach K, Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, to complete the first perfect season in major men’s college basketball since 1976. The good vs. evil narrative, trite as it is, would write itself. The cunning Calipari, the man whose system of shuttling players to the NBA after a year of college is a supposed affront to higher education, on one side, against Coach K, molder of student-athletes at prestigious Duke. That match-up guaranteed a monster TV rating.

Well, it’s not happening. Duke held up its end, as the Blue Devils trounced Michigan State, 81-61. However, Wisconsin gutted out a thrilling 71-64 victory over Kentucky to squash the Wildcats’ dreams of perfection. Plus, the Calipari/Krzyzewski clash is hogwash. If anything, Krzyzewski has copycatted Calipari’s strategy of recruiting NBA-ready players who are only in college because NBA rules require that they spend a year in school before they’re drafted. Kyrie Irving, Austin Rivers and Jabari Parker left Duke after just one year in 2011, 2012 and 2014, respectively; this year, Duke freshmen Jahlil Okafor and Justise Winslow are locks to be high first-round picks. Freshman guard Tyrus Jones could also go pro. So who’s one-and-done U here?

MORE: Here’s Your Final Four Drinking Game

According to the ol’ eye test, the Blue Devils were just too good for Michigan State on Saturday night. They should swarm Wisconsin too. In the first half against Kentucky, the Badgers needed a few crazy shots to go in to stay ahead. In the end, the skills of Wisconsin stars Frank Kaminsky and Sam Dekker—combined with some sloppy execution by Kentucky, which relied too much on guards Andrew and Aaron Harrison to create scoring chances, rather than give the ball to the big men—made the difference.

On Sunday, Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan said he got numerous texts from people reminding him that when the Team USA hockey team beat the Soviet Union to complete the Miracle on Ice at the 1980 Olympics, the U.S. still had to defeat Finland in the gold medal game. It’s cute to compare Wisconsin’s win over Kentucky to the Miracle on Ice, or even to Duke’s upset of the undefeated UNLV team in the 1991 national semis, but both comparisons are off. That Soviet team was unbeatable, and on paper a bunch of American amateurs had no conceivable shot to win. That UNLV team was not only undefeated, but it crushed everyone all year and had the same nucleus as the team that won the national title in 1990. Kentucky had a few close calls this season, including one just last week against Notre Dame in the regional final. The Wildcats had a perfect season going, but they weren’t a perfect team. It’s not entirely stunning that they lost.

And Duke, I suspect, poses a bigger challenge than the Fins—relatively speaking. If the Badgers are to beat Duke on Monday night, they’ll have to pull off the same feat they did against the Wildcats: make tough shots against a bunch of future pros. That’s difficult to do for two straight games.

One observer’s prognosis: one-and-done U will win the title. Just not the one most people expected.

TIME animals

Official ‘State Dog’ Designations Divide Utah and Maine

Getty Images

Dog breed favoritism divides two state legislatures

Lawmakers in Utah and Maine are waging the battle of the dog breeds, trying to get a favored variety recognized as their states’ official man’s best friend.

Supporters in Utah have had uneasy success making the golden retriever the “state domestic animal.” According to the the Salt Lake Tribune, the move came at the suggestion of a fourth-grade class. Those in favor cited the breed’s popularity across the state, as well as the golden retriever’s gentle temperament as a therapy animal.

But there were many on Monday who dissented out of loyalty to the german shepherd or the cocker spaniel, and the measure barely passed. It goes to a final vote later in the week.

Meanwhile, a bill to declare the labrador retriever Maine’s state dog suffered a resounding defeat in committee. State representatives, according to the Associated Press, wanted to avoid playing favorites, while one committee member called the whole affair a “waste of time.” (Notably, Maine already has an official state cat: the Maine coon cat.)

If Utah’s representatives vote to make the golden retriever as the official state pet, they’ll join five others that have singled out a dog or a cat. The Alaskan Malamute is, predictably, that state’s dog. Wisconsin has the American water spaniel, Louisiana has the Catahoula leopard dog and Maryland has bestowed the honor on the Chesapeake Bay retriever. Maryland is also the only state other than Maine with an official cat—the calico.

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